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Old 11-28-2012, 08:20 AM
 
Location: Tokyo, Japan
6,633 posts, read 8,322,265 times
Reputation: 7587

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Okay, so here's a thought. Frankly, I cant take people seriously when they use terms like "lightyears" to describe an average American city as urban in comparison to another. I mean, yeahhhh sure- for the United States but seriously that's a knee slapper.

Anyways, I understand the rules- we're not supposed to compare American cities with those outside of North America and we wont so I'll leave real world cities & their densities anonymous so it wont detract this comparison.

City A: Densest city in the world, population 1.6 million- 14 square miles & 111,000 people per square mile

City B: Population 12.5 million- 166 square miles & density of 75,000 people per square mile

City C: Population 5.1 million- 71 square miles & density of 72,000 people per square mile

City D: Population 2.2 million- 40 square miles & density is 54,000 people per square mile

City E: Population 550,000- 12 square miles & density of 48,000 people per square mile

City F: Population 1.6 million- 40 square miles & density of 40,000 people per square mile

City G: Population 5.5 million- 272 square miles & density of 19,000 people per square mile

Criteria:

- Large metropolitans with a population exceeding at least 5 million (I would like to be clear- yes small towns are excluded from this comparison)

- Has a weighted density (for urban area) above 10,000 people per square mile & a population exceeding 5 million

Excluding New York. That one clearly qualifies but what large city do you think best represents urban America closest to global standards that meets all my criteria? I'm talking about the runner up to New York, that's the debate- start!

Ohhh and yeahh it bears mentioning that we're not only looking for density even though it may seem that's all I implied I'm just trying to get this stared (rather poor job on my part). Please include functionality of an urban environment & anything else you could come up with, so long as the place meets the criteria.

Last edited by Trafalgar Law; 11-28-2012 at 08:31 AM..

 
Old 11-28-2012, 10:38 AM
 
Location: Zurich, Switzerland/ Piedmont, CA
32,346 posts, read 55,148,798 times
Reputation: 15420
Global standard?

The only standard the world uses to determine what is and what is not 'urban' is population. Obsession with population density is an annoyingly US/Canadian phenomenon.
 
Old 11-28-2012, 11:27 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,947,535 times
Reputation: 14805
Quote:
Originally Posted by valentro View Post
Criteria:

- Large metropolitans with a population exceeding at least 5 million (I would like to be clear- yes small towns are excluded from this comparison)

- Has a weighted density (for urban area) above 10,000 people per square mile & a population exceeding 5 million
By these two criteria, besides New York City only Los Angeles, Chicago and maybe San Francisco qualilfy.
 
Old 11-28-2012, 11:34 AM
 
Location: The City
22,331 posts, read 32,152,919 times
Reputation: 7738
Density calculations for U.S. urbanized areas, weighted by census tract - Austin Contrarian
 
Old 11-28-2012, 11:52 AM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
45,987 posts, read 41,947,535 times
Reputation: 14805
Quote:
Originally Posted by 18Montclair View Post
Global standard?

The only standard the world uses to determine what is and what is not 'urban' is population. Obsession with population density is an annoyingly US/Canadian phenomenon.
mostly because only many US, Canada (and Australian) cities are much lower density than anywhere else in the world which creates a different environment than dense city environments. Urban implies living in close proximity to others.
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