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Old 04-03-2015, 06:14 PM
 
Location: Simi Valley, California - which was once part of the USA
350 posts, read 383,275 times
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Which is most culturally "southern"?
Which is most republican?
Which is least "cosmopolitan" and most "middle american"?
Which is best bang for your buck?
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Old 04-03-2015, 07:54 PM
 
Location: Atlanta metro (Cobb County)
1,188 posts, read 542,646 times
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These three metropolitan areas are very similar in many respects. None of them are particularly conservative or culturally southern by regional standards, but Raleigh-Durham is probably the most liberal and Northeastern influenced. I would say there is more variation among different counties/cities within each metro area in ATL, CLT, and RDU than between the three metros as a whole. The outlying counties such as Bartow, Paulding, Cherokee, Barrow, Walton, etc. would qualify best within metro ATL for example.

Birmingham and Knoxville are examples of metro areas in the Southeast that would likely better meet your criteria.
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Old 04-03-2015, 08:28 PM
 
Location: Simi Valley, California - which was once part of the USA
350 posts, read 383,275 times
Reputation: 390
Okay so Raleigh is out then.


I'm not a southerner, I'm from socal. I like the southern culture though. Protestant and black/white as opposed to "internalltional" however these 3 places have JOBS which is most important.


Which is the most "American" of the places I mentioned? I am not looking for foreign accents or ethnic food etc. I just want to know where a conservative Christian like me who isn't into worldly, intellectual pursuits and likes to be around like minded people, very steak and apple pie foot ball watching american
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Old 04-03-2015, 08:59 PM
 
Location: FLORIDA
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Which is most culturally "southern"? Charlotte
Which is most republican? Charlotte
Which is least "cosmopolitan" and most "middle american"? Triangle area
Which is best bang for your buck? Charlotte.
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Old 04-04-2015, 07:50 AM
 
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I think Charlotte checks most of your boxes, but it's not by much; all of these areas are more characteristically similar than they are different.
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Old 04-04-2015, 01:20 PM
 
Location: Atlanta metro (Cobb County)
1,188 posts, read 542,646 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffSanDimas View Post
Okay so Raleigh is out then.


I'm not a southerner, I'm from socal. I like the southern culture though. Protestant and black/white as opposed to "internalltional" however these 3 places have JOBS which is most important.


Which is the most "American" of the places I mentioned? I am not looking for foreign accents or ethnic food etc. I just want to know where a conservative Christian like me who isn't into worldly, intellectual pursuits and likes to be around like minded people, very steak and apple pie foot ball watching american
Depending on the job market in your field, check out Greenville-Spartanburg, SC - way more conservative but easy driving distance to Atlanta and Charlotte.

Atlanta, Charlotte and Raleigh-Durham are only going to get more diverse and cosmopolitan in the future, but for a more traditionally southern cultural scene, look into the communities on the far outskirts of each of these areas. While GA and NC are currently under complete Republican control at the state level and voted for Romney in 2012, NC was Obama's narrowest loss in the nation and GA was close behind. NC is the second closest Southern state to the Northeast (after VA) and is getting a large influx of less conservative in-migrants from that direction.

I would agree with the other posters that Charlotte is marginally more conservative than the other two metro areas, and more so on the SC side (York County/Rock Hill).
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Old 04-04-2015, 04:59 PM
 
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Avoid Raleigh/Durham, unless you'd wish to live in some of the towns just outside the metro like Smithfield, Louisburg, Oxford, etc. These towns are more rural, with less transplants. Can't say that'll be the same case in the future, but I'm hoping they'll stay rural, though. Like others have pointed out, Raleigh/Durham definitely isn't Deep South. I know it's closer to the Northeast (about four hours south of DC), but it's transplant saturated in general, along with being pretty liberal (for the South) in some pockets like Durham and Chapel Hill/Carrboro. Anyway, I'd look away from the Research Triangle.

All three metros are very similar, in fact they're probably three of the most similar metros in the nation. Perfect examples of "New South" metros. If you want to pick between these three, I'd probably suggest Charlotte. However, some of the outer suburbs of Atlanta could possibly work, maybe areas along the lines of Woodstock, Alpharetta, Cumming, Buford, Gainesville, Acworth, etc. I've always been under the impression that Northern Georgia is very conservative. However, Charlotte is a Bible Belt buckle, hometown of Billy Graham with some pretty conservative suburbs and areas just outside the metro.

Honestly, I'd look into the Greenville/Spartaburg area of South Carolina. However, if you wish to narrow it down between these three, I'd probably say Charlotte.
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Old 04-04-2015, 06:15 PM
 
Location: FLORIDA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JayJayCB View Post
Avoid Raleigh/Durham, unless you'd wish to live in some of the towns just outside the metro like Smithfield, Louisburg, Oxford, etc. These towns are more rural, with less transplants. Can't say that'll be the same case in the future, but I'm hoping they'll stay rural, though. Like others have pointed out, Raleigh/Durham definitely isn't Deep South. I know it's closer to the Northeast (about four hours south of DC), but it's transplant saturated in general, along with being pretty liberal (for the South) in some pockets like Durham and Chapel Hill/Carrboro. Anyway, I'd look away from the Research Triangle.

All three metros are very similar, in fact they're probably three of the most similar metros in the nation. Perfect examples of "New South" metros. If you want to pick between these three, I'd probably suggest Charlotte. However, some of the outer suburbs of Atlanta could possibly work, maybe areas along the lines of Woodstock, Alpharetta, Cumming, Buford, Gainesville, Acworth, etc. I've always been under the impression that Northern Georgia is very conservative. However, Charlotte is a Bible Belt buckle, hometown of Billy Graham with some pretty conservative suburbs and areas just outside the metro.

Honestly, I'd look into the Greenville/Spartaburg area of South Carolina. However, if you wish to narrow it down between these three, I'd probably say Charlotte.

I agree completely. All 3 are pretty awesome places in the SE.

I'd also say to absolutely look into Greenville SC. Many transplants (mainly from FL) and some from the NE but still retains its southern charm and friendliness. It's my favorite city in the Southeast, along with Asheville. Runner-ups are places like Oviedo, FL and Alpharetta GA (for small/medium-sized cities).
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Old 04-04-2015, 06:31 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
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I agree with the post that recommended looking at the South Carolina side of the Charlotte metro.

I'll disagree with the post that said that Charlotte is least expensive. I think that Atlanta is the least expensive, especially in the more conservative suburbs.
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Old 04-04-2015, 07:07 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
I agree with the post that recommended looking at the South Carolina side of the Charlotte metro.

I'll disagree with the post that said that Charlotte is least expensive. I think that Atlanta is the least expensive, especially in the more conservative suburbs.
I think Charlotte's more conservative 'burbs are less expensive than Atlanta's, particularly Gaston County. None of Atlanta's immediate suburbs are that conservative, or that cheap.
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