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Old 01-31-2012, 02:42 PM
 
874 posts, read 924,258 times
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^That makes sense; out-sourcing is dependent on the industry if it is viable or not. As you mention, you are an independent consultant who can get away with minimal face-to-face communication and you don't need small-group interaction. That's definitely an area where economics of scale don't have a definite advantage over cultural relevancy. Customer service, IT support, back-office operations, and routine legal are some areas where the overseas advantage remains or could even grow, especially for routine legal services. I'm of the mind that the law profession is going to be savaged in the next 10 years or so as the bread and butter of routine legal work is either automated or out-sourced leaving the more complex areas of law to a smaller pool of specialized lawyers.

If I might ask, what do you do for a living?
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Old 02-06-2012, 09:24 AM
 
16 posts, read 33,604 times
Reputation: 24
Default Why Pueblo

Quote:
Originally Posted by wong21fr View Post
^That makes sense; out-sourcing is dependent on the industry if it is viable or not. As you mention, you are an independent consultant who can get away with minimal face-to-face communication and you don't need small-group interaction. That's definitely an area where economics of scale don't have a definite advantage over cultural relevancy. Customer service, IT support, back-office operations, and routine legal are some areas where the overseas advantage remains or could even grow, especially for routine legal services. I'm of the mind that the law profession is going to be savaged in the next 10 years or so as the bread and butter of routine legal work is either automated or out-sourced leaving the more complex areas of law to a smaller pool of specialized lawyers.

If I might ask, what do you do for a living?
I just started a blog and my first post was about why I'm moving to Pueblo. There are links from the blog to my profile on LinkedIn where you can learn more about what I do for a living. In my next life I'll be a teacher or a plumber or something that doesn't require a long explanation.

Why Pueblo? justinholman
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Old 02-06-2012, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,102 posts, read 20,360,320 times
Reputation: 4131
Quote:
Originally Posted by PuebloInvestor View Post
I just started a blog and my first post was about why I'm moving to Pueblo. There are links from the blog to my profile on LinkedIn where you can learn more about what I do for a living. In my next life I'll be a teacher or a plumber or something that doesn't require a long explanation.

Why Pueblo? justinholman
Great bog!

I liked it all but I really like this paragraph because this is what I have been talking about and my uncle, who was a CEO of major corporation before he retired, told me the same thing you said about 2 years ago.


I predict that Pueblo will be “discovered” in the next 10-20 years, especially as boomers retire with insufficient funding, parents refuse to pay $50k per year to send their kids to college and more and more people telecommute from home offices and realize they can live just about anywhere. I could certainly be dead wrong on this, and I’ve been wrong about many things, but I’ve decided to make a bet on Pueblo’s future and, believe me, I feel much better about investing in Pueblo than I do about investing in the stock market.

One of the key reasons is CSU Pueblo and as it grows Pueblo will have something it lacked in the past, even when it was the states second largest city, a educated workforce.

The renascence started in Pueblo in the mid 90's with the Riverwalk/ Convention center and the new jobs PEDCo brought here and really picked up steam with the name change of USC to CSU Pueblo 7 years ago. Now with the state grant for the convention center/ Riverwalk and what is going on north of town with the proposed Pueblo Springs Ranch including the tech park Pueblo will see even more economic growth so by 2020 I think this will be a much different and better city. Sure it will still be smaller then Colorado Springs and Denver but I think what will be going on here will make this a more prosperous city then most people in this state think it can be.

Last edited by Josseppie; 02-06-2012 at 12:45 PM..
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Old 02-10-2012, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,102 posts, read 20,360,320 times
Reputation: 4131
Talking City to roll out mat for NCAA's best

CSU Pueblo and the city of Pueblo is getting ready for more national exposure as the university is going to host the NCAA Division II Wrestling Championships. This is not the only national event CSU Pueblo will host in the next few years as well but one of a few. That is good for the university and city and is one more reason why I am so excited about the impact CSU Pueblo has on Pueblo.

This is from the Chieftain:


Wrestling fever is spreading ahead of the NCAA Division II Wrestling Championships in four weeks. Host school Colorado State University-Pueblo on Thursday outlined the prep work now under way to get ready for the March 9-10 tournament at the school's Massari Arena. School leaders, speaking at a Greater Pueblo Chamber of Commerce luncheon at the Pueblo Convention Center, also encouraged businesses and the community to get behind the event. The school starting Feb. 20 will make available flyers, posters and table-top advertisements for local businesses to display.

The link: http://www.chieftain.com/business/lo...9bb2963f4.html

Last edited by Josseppie; 02-10-2012 at 11:22 AM..
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Old 02-14-2012, 04:50 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,102 posts, read 20,360,320 times
Reputation: 4131
Talking Pueblo is a university town!

The New York Times did a article on the post earmark era and how it affects small cities and they included Pueblo. It was a interesting article but what really caught my eye was how the New York Times referred to Pueblo. In the past it would have been a "steel town" or recently a "former steel city" but this is how they explained Pueblo this time:

Pueblo, a university town of roughly 106,000 people about 110 miles south of Denver.

This might not seem like much but if this is how people in New York Times view Pueblo I would be willing to bet other outside organizations and companies look at us the same way. Im my opiniomn this is a direct result of the impact Colorado State University - Pueblo has had and why I cant stress enough it has been the best thing to happen to Pueblo, now a university town, in my lifetime.

The link: http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/03/us...al-grants.html
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Old 02-17-2012, 11:21 PM
 
1 posts, read 9,607 times
Reputation: 13
Are you kidding? UCCS is a higher profile school than CSU-P will ever be. CSU-P is a glorified community college. There's no comparison, academically. Just once check some facts. Let's look at acceptance rates, just one good measure:

CSUP - 94.78% (US News "less selective," unranked Tier 2 university)
UCCS - 64.58% (US News "selective," ranked regional university)

Colorado College also doesn't have a football team in the Springs, so do you think CSU-Pueblo is a "bigger/better" school than CC....or better academically? Puhlease. UCCS has the same admission standards as CU-Boulder. Colorado Springs has FIVE military bases....Ft. Carson, Peterson AFB, Cheyenne Mtn (NORAD), Schriever AFB, and the Air Force Academy....none of these bases are closing and the economy doesn't depend the military as much as once did. The reasons the Springs grew is because it diversified and brought in high tech companies, healthcare, military contractors like Lockheed Martin, ITT, Honeywell, and others. They didn't just depend on manufacturing, industrial companies and the steel mills.

Last edited by djrom66; 02-17-2012 at 11:32 PM..
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Old 02-18-2012, 12:56 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
18,929 posts, read 8,888,619 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Josseppie View Post

Great bog!
Yes, I think you finally have the right perspective on Pueblo -- it's a great bog!

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Old 02-19-2012, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,102 posts, read 20,360,320 times
Reputation: 4131
Quote:
Originally Posted by djrom66 View Post
Are you kidding? UCCS is a higher profile school than CSU-P will ever be. CSU-P is a glorified community college. There's no comparison, academically. Just once check some facts. Let's look at acceptance rates, just one good measure:

CSUP - 94.78% (US News "less selective," unranked Tier 2 university)
UCCS - 64.58% (US News "selective," ranked regional university)

Colorado College also doesn't have a football team in the Springs, so do you think CSU-Pueblo is a "bigger/better" school than CC....or better academically? Puhlease. UCCS has the same admission standards as CU-Boulder. Colorado Springs has FIVE military bases....Ft. Carson, Peterson AFB, Cheyenne Mtn (NORAD), Schriever AFB, and the Air Force Academy....none of these bases are closing and the economy doesn't depend the military as much as once did. The reasons the Springs grew is because it diversified and brought in high tech companies, healthcare, military contractors like Lockheed Martin, ITT, Honeywell, and others. They didn't just depend on manufacturing, industrial companies and the steel mills.
I could post about how I like CSU Pueblo better the UCCS and Colorado College but to be honest that is really irrelevant as that is a personal choice and will very from person to person. The point I have been trying to make is the name change from the University of Southern Colorado to Colorado State University - Pueblo has been a game changer not only for the university but the city as a whole. The fact that it is the only "large" and growing tier 2 university outside of the Denver CSA with a football program only gives the school much more awareness. Will it ever be a CU Boulder or CSU Fort Collins? Most likely no but it does not have to be to have a huge economic impact on Pueblo. What it can be is a large tier 2 university with 15,000 to 20,000 students and since it is part of the Colorado State System it will have a decent research budget and most likely one of the best football teams in division 2 and that is making Pueblo more of a "university town" and will have a positive impact on the kind of companies that move here. Which is one reason regional planners have said Pueblo will grow at least 11 times more in the next 30 years then it did in the past 50.
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Old 02-19-2012, 02:25 PM
Status: "Rocktober...well that was fast. :-(" (set 23 days ago)
 
Location: Fredericksburg, VA
10,303 posts, read 10,459,937 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Josseppie View Post
The point I have been trying to make is the name change from the University of Southern Colorado to Colorado State University - Pueblo has been a game changer not only for the university but the city as a whole.
This is a true statement. As I understand it, the school was literally on the brink of shutting down (or maybe it was on the brink of losing accreditation?) before the Colorado State University namesake saved it. Perhaps the situation was not as dire as I've heard, but it if was, then CSU-Pueblo's turnaround is a testament to the powerful reputation of Colorado State University. (And this is coming from a University of Colorado Grad!) The name association alone seems to have revived the school. And a minor university in the big picture of academics in the U.S. can still be a major part of the community of Pueblo improving itself.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Josseppie View Post
The fact that it is the only "large" and growing tier 2 university outside of the Denver CSA with a football program only gives the school much more awareness. Will it ever be a CU Boulder or CSU Fort Collins? Most likely no but it does not have to be to have a huge economic impact on Pueblo. What it can be is a large tier 2 university with 15,000 to 20,000 students...
The sky is the limit. UCCS is the University of Colorado's designated "growth" campus and is on tier with some state schools' flagship campuses. Meanwhile CSU-P can be the same for the Colorado State University system, and that appears to be the case. I think it will take a LONG time before it reaches 15,000-20,000 students, as it is currently about 5,000-6,000 or so. Growing too fast will likely compromise the quality of the instruction that students receive. My guess is that it'll level off around 8,500-10,000 students eventually. Will it ever be the best university in Colorado? Probably not. But it is the right university for Pueblo, and that is what's key.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Josseppie View Post
Which is one reason regional planners have said Pueblo will grow at least 11 times more in the next 30 years then it did in the past 50.
I'm not sure how this can be predicted. Pueblo in 1960 had about 91,000 people. As of the 2010 census, the city had grown to about 106,000, for growth of approximately 15,000 over a 50 year span. If regional planners are right, the area will add 165,000 for a total of roughly 325,000. This over doubles the regional population in just 30 years. I doubt that growth that fast will occur, though I would expect the area to still grow during that span. I'm guessing that in 30 years the Pueblo region will have about 225,000 people.
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Old 02-19-2012, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Pueblo - Colorado's Second City
12,102 posts, read 20,360,320 times
Reputation: 4131
Quote:
Originally Posted by iknowftbll View Post
This is a true statement. As I understand it, the school was literally on the brink of shutting down (or maybe it was on the brink of losing accreditation?) before the Colorado State University namesake saved it. Perhaps the situation was not as dire as I've heard, but it if was, then CSU-Pueblo's turnaround is a testament to the powerful reputation of Colorado State University. (And this is coming from a University of Colorado Grad!) The name association alone seems to have revived the school. And a minor university in the big picture of academics in the U.S. can still be a major part of the community of Pueblo improving itself.
I think you are more right then people would like to admit about the university when it was USC. Plus another factor that gets overlooked is community support. When it was USC it really did not have much support and to be honest I think many Puebloans felt it would be better to close it down then have it here with its lousy reputation. Now that it is CSU Pueblo and part of the Colorado State system the city and region embrace it. One example is the football program. Back in the 70's and early 80's before they shut down the program the university played their home games at the high school stadium and not many people went to the games. Since they brought back football they used all private donations to build a football stadium that is one of the best in division 2 and the people show up. In just 4 years they have become a Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference (RMAC) power house and when they made it to the playoffs nearly sold out the stadium. Now a good sports program is great but the key lies in academics. Colorado is a interesting state as we have two major systems in higher education that get most of the research money, the Colorado University system and the Colorado State system. That is not to say the other universities are not good and do research but it just seems that in Colorado we put a lot of emphasis on the 2 systems. Now that this university is part of the Colorado State system you can see the direction of the university changing as they add degrees and get more into the research side of things. Overall I think CSU Pueblo will be a top tier 2 university and it will change Pueblo is ways no one can predict.



Quote:
Originally Posted by iknowftbll View Post
The sky is the limit. UCCS is the University of Colorado's designated "growth" campus and is on tier with some state schools' flagship campuses. Meanwhile CSU-P can be the same for the Colorado State University system, and that appears to be the case. I think it will take a LONG time before it reaches 15,000-20,000 students, as it is currently about 5,000-6,000 or so. Growing too fast will likely compromise the quality of the instruction that students receive. My guess is that it'll level off around 8,500-10,000 students eventually. Will it ever be the best university in Colorado? Probably not. But it is the right university for Pueblo, and that is what's key.
I think you are right about UCCS and CSU Pueblo being the "growth" schools for their systems. Growing to fast is not good but I really don't see CSU Pueblo leveling off till 15,000 to 20,000 students and from talking to university officials I think it will be sooner then a lot of people realize.



Quote:
Originally Posted by iknowftbll View Post
I'm not sure how this can be predicted. Pueblo in 1960 had about 91,000 people. As of the 2010 census, the city had grown to about 106,000, for growth of approximately 15,000 over a 50 year span. If regional planners are right, the area will add 165,000 for a total of roughly 325,000. This over doubles the regional population in just 30 years. I doubt that growth that fast will occur, though I would expect the area to still grow during that span. I'm guessing that in 30 years the Pueblo region will have about 225,000 people.
I will be the first to admit that long range growth planning is a crap shoot at best. Before Colorado Springs got the military no one expected them to grow and in the 60's when the steel industry was going strong everyone expected Pueblo to keep up with the growth of the Springs. That being said with everything that is going on in Pueblo and the fact we are the regional hub for a 20 county region growing 165,000 people in 30 years is not unreasonable especially considering how much the Springs MSA and Denver CSA are expected to grow. I mean the proposed Pueblo Springs Ranch development alone is expected to add 200,000 people to Pueblo in 50 years. At 325,000 people Pueblo would be a nice sized city but still considerable less then the population of Denver and Colorado Springs.
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