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Old 10-01-2013, 03:07 PM
 
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I still call teachers at "my schools" by their last name, as in "Miz" (not Mrs. or Miss) Jones and "Mr. Smith". Most of them are younger...
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Old 10-01-2013, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Georgia native in McKinney, TX
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Originally Posted by Lakewooder View Post
I still call teachers at "my schools" by their last name, as in "Miz" (not Mrs. or Miss) Jones and "Mr. Smith". Most of them are younger...
And I would do the same. The only time I would use "Miss" or "Mrs." and the lady's last name would be in a situation where I know for positive that she wants that term used. Otherwise, Ms. is appropriate. Luckily for us with southern accents, the pronounciations of those three all end up sounding pretty much alike anyway, lol. In a situation where children are expected to call adults by an honorific and their last name (like their teachers), the parents should follow suit.

The situation I described previously is the proper situation for children to use when addressing their parents friends and associates that the parents refer to by first name. Children should never be so familiar as to call adults by their first name alone. Same with relatives as BigD mentions, Aunt and/or Uncle should be used.... many times even if the relation is not the parents' siblings.

This follows a proper southerner into adulthood. I still, in my fifties will refer to my mother's friends or ladies in my home church by Miss Janie, Miss Rochelle, Miss Jeanette, etc, etc. Archaic? Maybe to some. Proper and polite and honoring to your elders? Always without a doubt.
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Old 10-01-2013, 07:30 PM
 
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Unless you are speaking to someone in authority over you, I don't see the point of sir or ma'am. I expect children to use that with adults, or adults with their work superiors, or adults with the customers they are serving, but not adults with other adult co-workers or neighbors or people they pass on the street. Just say Hello. When you know their name, say, "Hello, first name."
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