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Old 08-18-2016, 08:15 PM
 
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We just adopted a dog a week ago, 2 year old large male mix. He was neutered and it was said he was totally vetted. I plan to take him in next week for a check up anyways. But I have noticed, he has HUGE stinky poops and a lot of stinky gas. I thought it was from bad shelter food. But he has been on super premium grain free food and treats (what we feed our other dog) for over a week and its the same (who is 10 lbs less and poops small not-too-smelly poops and seems to never have gas). He seems healthy, despite needing to gain a few pounds.

Any thoughts about what it could be? Worms or an infection? Or do some dogs have giant stinky poops? Should I try pumpkin?
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Old 08-18-2016, 08:59 PM
 
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We had a similar situation with one of our rescue dogs. For the first week we had her, she pooped a lot! She went NINE times one day. The vet did not seem too concerned, and everything turned out fine.
I put it down to crappy shelter food, changing to a new diet (at the time it was Blue Buffalo Grain Free Beef with the wolf on the front of the package), and just adjusting overall.

I know that suddenly switching my dogs to a new food can cause a lot of digestive upset for them, so it could be as simple as that.

Still, your vet may have some valuable input here.
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Old 08-18-2016, 09:58 PM
 
Location: Santa Barbara CA
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You could try giving him some digestive enzymes with probiotics as it will help balance his gut.His prior diet may have caused an imbalance of the bacteria in his gut.I use a product made by NaturVet that is a powder you sprinkle in their food. I get it at the feed store but many pet shops carry it too.Really helps maintain a healthy gut.
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Old 08-19-2016, 12:27 PM
 
Location: VT; previously MD & NJ
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If his digestion doesn't settle down soon, you could try one of the limited ingredients foods. If that helps, then there is something in the regular food you are feeding him that doesn't agree with him. Another probiotic is FortaFlora (from the vet).
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Old 08-19-2016, 01:02 PM
 
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Look up digestive issues, especially the different types of pancreatic insufficiency. Especially if the poop is large and runny, like a cow pie? There are many things it could be.

Being vetted for worms doesn't always catch every type (because of their life cycle), so take a poo sample when you go to the vet again. Even if they don't see worms they might worm with a full spectrum wormer, after they have ruled everything else out. Try to check all his poops for worms.

I wouldn't change anything now until you see the vet, don't add or take away. Try to write everything down (including changes in food, gas, poop). If you do, you might make it worse, and still not know what is causing it. Though I don't think a T of pumpkin per meal would hurt, you said he was large so I am guessing 60+ lbs? If he is smaller than that I would try one teaspoon per meal first.

Definitely save the limited ingredient diet until you know you need it, or you will have exposed your dog to something that you may later have to rule out as diet.
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Old 08-19-2016, 02:36 PM
 
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Many shelter animals have been feed various types of foods (some get donations they mix in, others get various bulk types). If you suddenly change their diet, expect problems. It may have nothing to do with the perceived quality of the shelter or your food. There have been hundreds of post from people going from one quality food to another quality food with the exact same issues. Making a radical sudden change to the animals diet (especially if the diet change at the shelter was also a radical change from the diet they received as a pet), is going to cause digestive confusion and it will show up in their poop and gas. Just pure common sense! So, monitor the digestion and outcome as well as looking to ensure their appetite is normal. Unless the animal is in distress, pain, or undergoing some other obvious change, usually time will straighten out their guts. Just think it through; thousands of pets are adopted and the number one complaint is their digestion goes Chernobyl for awhile with a normal followup of things are all good after a few weeks.
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Old 08-19-2016, 02:48 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rabrrita View Post
Many shelter animals have been feed various types of foods (some get donations they mix in, others get various bulk types). If you suddenly change their diet, expect problems. It may have nothing to do with the perceived quality of the shelter or your food. There have been hundreds of post from people going from one quality food to another quality food with the exact same issues. Making a radical sudden change to the animals diet (especially if the diet change at the shelter was also a radical change from the diet they received as a pet), is going to cause digestive confusion and it will show up in their poop and gas. Just pure common sense! So, monitor the digestion and outcome as well as looking to ensure their appetite is normal. Unless the animal is in distress, pain, or undergoing some other obvious change, usually time will straighten out their guts. Just think it through; thousands of pets are adopted and the number one complaint is their digestion goes Chernobyl for awhile with a normal followup of things are all good after a few weeks.
Yes, agree.
Barring any medical issues, unless the dog is malnourished, I would fast for 24 hours, then mix boiled chicken breast (no skin) into real (not minute rice) white rice with a teaspoon or so of pure pumpkin mixed in to make a slurry; the bit of extra water/broth in the slurry will help to rehydrate.
Then gradually after 2-3 days and the bowels have stabilized, start mixing in the kibble/canned food you are using and phase out the rice/chicken mix.

Or here is another variation:
Vet Advice: Treating Your Dog's Diarrhea | The Bark
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Old 08-19-2016, 04:03 PM
 
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Luckily it isn't diarrhea. Its just massive poops. I've fostered and adopted a lot, just haven't run into this. If they have trouble with the switch, its usually diarrhea. He is very regular...first poop 6:30am...yes, am. UGH! Second 6pm. LOL what a dog. Today he puked on me. Such fun.

He is awfully cute and sweet though.
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Old 08-19-2016, 04:08 PM
 
12,392 posts, read 7,452,214 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HighFlyingBird View Post
We just adopted a dog a week ago, 2 year old large male mix. He was neutered and it was said he was totally vetted. I plan to take him in next week for a check up anyways. But I have noticed, he has HUGE stinky poops and a lot of stinky gas. I thought it was from bad shelter food. But he has been on super premium grain free food and treats (what we feed our other dog) for over a week and its the same (who is 10 lbs less and poops small not-too-smelly poops and seems to never have gas). He seems healthy, despite needing to gain a few pounds.

Any thoughts about what it could be? Worms or an infection? Or do some dogs have giant stinky poops? Should I try pumpkin?
Did you gradually switch him over to the new food or just switch cold turkey? A good shelter should provide you with the food that he was eating there so that you are able to switch him over to whatever you are planning to feed. Even the best dog food can cause problems for some dogs if changed too quickly. Since it has only been a week, and the dog might have already gone through a sudden food change when he came into the shelter, it might just be because of that. Knowing that he is sensitive to food changes, if you ever switch his food again, try to do so gradually over a period of 1-2 weeks.
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Old 08-19-2016, 05:01 PM
 
Location: North Western NJ
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well firstly...changed in food take a minimum of 2 weeks and up to 8 weeks to realy figure themselves out....so a week on the new food might not be a very helpful judgement period...
secondly super premium grain free foods can sometimes be too rich for dogs not used to such diets (especially if the protein is richer, like pork, beef, duck ect...
if after 2 weks on the new food hes still super stinky try something like chicken or lamb and rice...I know grain free is "better" but some dogs just cant handle it...

assuming his fecal is good, poops look normal and hes not otherwise having issues, its likely an imbalance in the gut.

suggestion #1:
PATIENTS, 2-8 weeks on a new food fo the body to completely detox and readjust.

2: Add a good probiotic, be it a good UNSWEETEND plain unflavored yogurt, or an actual probiotic pill or powder like probios, itll help his system adjust.

3: and this ones the one that's going to sound odd...assuming all else is "normal"
PARSLEY...
this trick was given to me by a bulldog frined and its carried me through the years through many a stinker...
depending on the sie of the dog, 1tsp-1tbs a day of dried parsley with his food...(since you feed dry sprinkle a little water over his kibble to help it stick)
parsley wont cut back the gas...but its a natural doggy safe deodorizer that takes the power out of the poop lol.
sis didn't belive me...then she got a Frenchie...now he gets a sprinkling of parsley at every meal...it realy does work.
you can also home make cookies and add some parsley to the batter for both gas and breath freshening
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