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Old 01-16-2012, 03:38 PM
 
3,247 posts, read 3,042,309 times
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Default Leda? In public? Really?

There I was, walking along, minding my own business, when I suddenly came across a Botero sculpture of Leda and the Swan. I kept thinking that if this were in a midwest park, instead of in a Manhattan passway, it would have caused quite a furor.

artnet Galleries: Leda and the Swan by Fernando Botero from Galerie Gmurzynska
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Old 01-17-2012, 04:35 AM
 
Location: Michigan--good on the rocks
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Possibly. I think most wouldn't recognize the source, and that's a shame. In defense of the midwest, though, I remember a thread about a Venus de Milo snow sculpture in New Jersey which was made to be taken down.

Its a sad statement about our education.
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Old 01-27-2012, 03:43 PM
 
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I completely agree that most people would't recognize the source, but, still, I think a lot of places would object to a large sculpture of a supine nude woman.
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Old 01-28-2012, 01:03 AM
 
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Oh, yea, those hicks in the "midwest" sure would be up in arms about that piece. Chrissake, they'd have the good ole' pastor out there to whoop up a heap of Bible thumping over it.

----------------

New Yorkers are sooooo sophisticated, we need them to show the rest of fly over country what is real art and how to pay it the proper respect.

Every time I have been in Manhattan, 99% of the people I see look like they wouldn't recognize anything more complicated than a Philly Cheesesteak. Mouth breathers. Or were you speaking about what the limo and doorman set would say about it? The Sunday Times readers. The trust fund crowd? Is that who would love that piece? Because my guess is that in Manhattan or Brooklyn the average person on the street taking the time to look at it is more likely to say:

Yo! Vick! Looky ad da fawking boyd fawking that fawking pigmy. Whadda fawk yo tink dat is bow?"

Last edited by Wilson513; 01-28-2012 at 01:30 AM..
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Old 02-03-2012, 08:57 PM
 
Location: Sinking in the Great Salt Lake
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I still don't get why "naked babe getting banged by a bird" is such a popular artistic subject in the first place, but to each his own I guess.
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Old 02-04-2012, 05:22 PM
 
Location: University City, Philadelphia
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The story behind Leda was the Greek god Zeus physically desired her, so he assumed the shape and form of a swan and came to her in that way in order to make love to her.

Besides being the king of the gods, Zeus was a horny b-st-rd. He fancied a handsome Greek lad, Ganymede, and changed himself into an eagle and swooped down from Mount Olympus to abduct the young fellow and take him back home.

Even more bizarre, old Zeus had the hots for a young lady named Danae, and this time came to her in the form - I am not making this up! - of "a golden shower"! Okay, I am sure you are all snickering now.

They just don't teach this stuff to us in school when we are learning about those nasty pervy Greeks ... instead they tell us about how they invented Democracy and built the Parthenon and humiliated the Persians.
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Old 02-08-2012, 03:50 AM
 
Location: Oxford, England
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clark Park View Post
The story behind Leda was the Greek god Zeus physically desired her, so he assumed the shape and form of a swan and came to her in that way in order to make love to her.

Besides being the king of the gods, Zeus was a horny b-st-rd. He fancied a handsome Greek lad, Ganymede, and changed himself into an eagle and swooped down from Mount Olympus to abduct the young fellow and take him back home.

Even more bizarre, old Zeus had the hots for a young lady named Danae, and this time came to her in the form - I am not making this up! - of "a golden shower"! Okay, I am sure you are all snickering now.

They just don't teach this stuff to us in school when we are learning about those nasty pervy Greeks ... instead they tell us about how they invented Democracy and built the Parthenon and humiliated the Persians.

Zeus certainly was a randy old coot ! And devious with that. Hera , his wife seemed to spend most of her time plotting revenge on the nymphs and women Zeus had affairs with... If I remember correctly wasn't she also Zeus' sister as well as his wife and one of the myth is that Hebe ( Goddess of Youth) their daughter was actually conceived by Hera being impregnated by lettuce rather than Zeus ?!?! Who knew salad could be so virile ?!?


I'm afraid my schools taught me all the old Greek Mythology as well as the bit about Democracy,Socrates,Pericles etc... Catholic schools too, go figure....

We were taught both Greek and Latin names for all the Gods and Demi Gods too. Mind you we also did Norse , Pre-Colombian and Indian Mythology though not so much in depth.

It is a rather odd subject for public art but a lot of the sculptures depicting Leda and the Swan are nonetheless beautiful in an "OMG" sort of way ! Trying to explain that to a five year old could get interesting though... Some of the sculptures are far more explicit than others of course.
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Old 02-08-2012, 04:38 PM
 
Location: University City, Philadelphia
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Thanks, Moose, for your insights.

I remember in school when I was about 12 or 13 (Seventh grade) I had to do a report on a character in Greek Mythology, so I chose the story of Narcissus and Echo. That was pretty tame. The handsome dude so his own reflection in a pool of still water and fell in love with himself. Pretty tame. People fall in love with themselves all the time.
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Old 02-09-2012, 08:03 AM
 
Location: Oxford, England
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clark Park View Post
Thanks, Moose, for your insights.

I remember in school when I was about 12 or 13 (Seventh grade) I had to do a report on a character in Greek Mythology, so I chose the story of Narcissus and Echo. That was pretty tame. The handsome dude so his own reflection in a pool of still water and fell in love with himself. Pretty tame. People fall in love with themselves all the time.
I chose Prometheus,Sisiphus and Tantalus for my reports. What does that say about me ?!?! I must have an element of Masochism within me ! Or perhaps Sadism...


My Father bought me some beautifully illustrated books on Greek and Roman Mythology when I was little and I have been looking for similar ones since. If anyone can recommend some lavislhy illustrated books on the topic I welcome all suggestions.
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Old 02-12-2012, 05:48 AM
 
Location: Pacific Northwest
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The Midwest's idea of art are paintings of Madona & Child, and Jesus, and not much more then that. But I do know that there are many in the bible belt and Midwest that can't be clumped into the harsh conservative views.

After visiting Museums in Istanbul, Ephesus, Kuşadası, then in Rhodes, Crete, Cyprus, Athens, Jerusalem, Haifa, Ashdad. I could live and tour museums there and always discover new things. Jerusalem's holocaust was that hardest to go thru, especially the special children's building. Where 5 candles and all mirrors make it look like there is a candle for each of the 1.5 million children killed. I haven't viewed the tape since. Their names are said around the clock, never stopping.

The Parthenon in Athens was amazing. I'd loved to take my pencils and pastels and enough sketch books to create my art. I hope someday to be able to go to D.C. and wonder thru their museums.



[quote=Cida;22571569]There I was, walking along, minding my own business, when I suddenly came across a Botero sculpture of Leda and the Swan. I kept thinking that if this were in a midwest park, instead of in a Manhattan passway, it would have caused quite a furor.

/QUOTE]
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