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Old 05-25-2014, 10:18 PM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston
33,587 posts, read 51,786,623 times
Reputation: 83025

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Today I was going to buy me some ice cream (does not happen very often in my household ).
So I checked the labels, and guess what... a 1/2 cup serving could be anything between 40 and 120 grams!!

Of course most rich, heavy brands had 1/2 cup measured as ~60 grams. The lighter, sorbet kinds had 1/2 cup measured as 120 g.
Now compare two different ice creams that claim to deliver 220 cal per serving (1/2 cup):
1/2 cup (60g) = 220 cal & 1/2 cup (120g) = 220 cal, and you will see that the first ice cream actually has 440 cal in 120g serving...

Considering that most ice creams come in a similar pint (or nowadays a bit less than a pint) containers, it's a real mystery how they get a different number of 1/2 cup servings of it. Same with a half gallon containers.
Of course we can debate the density or compare 1/2 cup with 4 fl oz etc. Most people do not take the time, they just see 1/2 cup serving and the amount of calories...

Since 1/2 cup not equal 1/2 cup, you better check the metric amount in grams.
However, I also spotted some labels with only 1/2 cup serving size, without the gram amount.

Those are the rare moments, when I wish that we are using metric measurements, and the guessing game, and "playing with the numbers" is over. Because table spoon is not equal table spoon, cup is not equal to a cup, etc. and everything is just approximate, and if they stop posting both - the imperial AND the metric values - we will know even less ...

Here you can check various ice cream labels:
ice cream nutrition labels - Google Search

BTW: the various serving sizes apply to everything else too.
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Old 05-25-2014, 10:43 PM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
10,863 posts, read 18,892,348 times
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I just buy the little cups of ice cream, since measuring 1/2 cup into a bowl has never gone well for me...looks too little, I decide to add a bit more, then a bit more than that the next time, and so on. So I buy little single-serving cups and have one every few days. It's more expensive that way and there's a much smaller selection of flavors, but it helps me keep track of how much I'm eating and it makes it less tempting.
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Old 05-26-2014, 06:54 AM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston
33,587 posts, read 51,786,623 times
Reputation: 83025
You could also place individual scoops in a cupcake tin lined with paper baking cups, cover with saran wrap and freeze. That way you would have individual portions ready to eat.
http://img4-3.realsimple.timeinc.net...ecream_300.jpg
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Old 05-26-2014, 08:41 AM
 
12,579 posts, read 12,802,007 times
Reputation: 8855
Quote:
Originally Posted by elnina View Post
Today I was going to buy me some ice cream (does not happen very often in my household ).
So I checked the labels, and guess what... a 1/2 cup serving could be anything between 40 and 120 grams!!

Of course most rich, heavy brands had 1/2 cup measured as ~60 grams. The lighter, sorbet kinds had 1/2 cup measured as 120 g.
Now compare two different ice creams that claim to deliver 220 cal per serving (1/2 cup):
1/2 cup (60g) = 220 cal & 1/2 cup (120g) = 220 cal, and you will see that the first ice cream actually has 440 cal in 120g serving...

Considering that most ice creams come in a similar pint (or nowadays a bit less than a pint) containers, it's a real mystery how they get a different number of 1/2 cup servings of it. Same with a half gallon containers.
Of course we can debate the density or compare 1/2 cup with 4 fl oz etc. Most people do not take the time, they just see 1/2 cup serving and the amount of calories...

Since 1/2 cup not equal 1/2 cup, you better check the metric amount in grams.
However, I also spotted some labels with only 1/2 cup serving size, without the gram amount.

Those are the rare moments, when I wish that we are using metric measurements, and the guessing game, and "playing with the numbers" is over. Because table spoon is not equal table spoon, cup is not equal to a cup, etc. and everything is just approximate, and if they stop posting both - the imperial AND the metric values - we will know even less ...

Here you can check various ice cream labels:
ice cream nutrition labels - Google Search

BTW: the various serving sizes apply to everything else too.
I see your point (after I checked the measuring instruments) but, much of this is marketing trickery designed to deceive the consumer.
I think there is new label legislation in the works but I'm sure there will be deceit in the new ones too.
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Old 05-26-2014, 10:44 AM
 
Location: Somewhere over the rainbow in "OZ "
23,648 posts, read 21,977,910 times
Reputation: 29509
Purchase proportional scoops..

Ice Cream Scoops | FSW
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Old 05-26-2014, 08:24 PM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston
33,587 posts, read 51,786,623 times
Reputation: 83025
Yeah... but the ice cream was just an example....
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Old 05-26-2014, 10:28 PM
 
Location: Somewhere over the rainbow in "OZ "
23,648 posts, read 21,977,910 times
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You can use those scoops for just about anything.. cookies -- beef slider -- meat balls --- on the commercial market side they sell numerous proportion stuff...
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Old 05-27-2014, 12:43 AM
 
Location: San Antonio/Houston
33,587 posts, read 51,786,623 times
Reputation: 83025
I know Tin-Man, but this is not the point of this thread. The point is the somehow misleading serving sizes printed on the labels, mainly to conceal the real amount of calories and nutrition facts (sugar, salt or fat) - per serving. Or making it hard to to compare.
If you think, you can compare 1/2 cup serving with 1/2 serving, you might be surprised to find out that they are not equal and could weight between 40 and 120 grams. (as illustrated in my ice cream example).
If the label were written correct, there would be no reason for me to measure anything.
In my example, I just wanted to say, that glancing at the label might be not enough. If there is gram amount listed, you have to compare those numbers. It's easier with ounces, because they are all exact the same weight in grams. But cups and spoons sizes might wary, therefore the calories amount will vary too.

BTW: the new nutrition labels are not going to be different. The difference is only in the look. Some numbers are bigger to spot, and the percentage amount shifted from right to left - not sure what is the point of that...

Last edited by elnina; 05-27-2014 at 12:58 AM..
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Old 05-27-2014, 01:00 AM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
12,448 posts, read 10,135,059 times
Reputation: 28069
I always order a single scoop of hand-dipped or a small cone of soft-serve. Sometimes I get more than I asked for, but I'm never bound to eat all of it. Sometimes I just have to rely on my "common-sense."
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Old 05-27-2014, 01:02 AM
 
Location: Honolulu, Makiki
351 posts, read 435,558 times
Reputation: 919
Elnina isn't the difference between different ice creams is because the cheaper brands have a LOT of air whipped up in them.

I notice Hagen Daz and other premium, more expensive ice creams are a lot more dense and melt slower because they have far less air in them. (And also harder to scoop)
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