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Old 03-05-2018, 06:58 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
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Anyone here have success attracting Mason bees? How did you do it? Was it worthwhile to you?
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Old 03-05-2018, 07:31 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
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I did but it was not intentional on my part, it just happened as a consequence of me adding to the yard's decorative landscaping with several uniquely shaped branches and logs of our coastal driftwood. The branches were riddled with marine worm holes everywhere in the wood. They were really cool looking pieces of driftwood. Mason bees thought so too because they took a liking to the deeper holes in the driftwood and used those holes to lay their eggs in them and then they capped the holes. I just left them alone to do their thing.


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Old 03-06-2018, 02:31 PM
 
11,287 posts, read 16,811,646 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
Anyone here have success attracting Mason bees? How did you do it? Was it worthwhile to you?

Yes and Yes.

Stumbled upon the idea while surfing the net. Bought a bee house and the cardboard tubes. Hung it below the gutters (I have a ranch house) and made sure there was a bit of wet mud for them.

All of a sudden they started moving in. It's fun to watch them and they basically ignore you. I harvested the cocoons and kept them in a special container over the winter in the fridge. Put them out once spring arrived and it was SRO in the bee house.

The bee house is next to my nectarine tree and their pollination gave me a bumper crop.

Give it a try.
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Old 03-09-2018, 09:04 PM
 
Location: Top of the South, NZ
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Why would you want to attract Mason bees? -spider control?

I'm always trying to get rid of them.
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Old 03-10-2018, 12:33 AM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe90 View Post
Why would you want to attract Mason bees? -spider control?

I'm always trying to get rid of them.

Not for spider control. Bees don't prey on spiders, spiders do prey on bees.

In North America pollinators are a big deal as many types of wild pollinators are on the decline. Mason bees are invaluable to orchardists and gardeners who need pollinators for their crops. They're more efficient pollinators than honey bees and other pollinators are, and they cover more area. They're gentle, non-aggressive and don't require the same kind of care or equipment that honey bees require.

Why Attract Mason Bees FAQ | Minga Skill Building Hub

https://www.ecolandscaping.org/03/be...e-gear-needed/

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Old 03-10-2018, 01:03 AM
 
Location: Top of the South, NZ
15,875 posts, read 12,444,377 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Not for spider control. Bees don't prey on spiders, spiders do prey on bees.

In North America pollinators are a big deal as many types of wild pollinators are on the decline. Mason bees are invaluable to orchardists and gardeners who need pollinators for their crops. They're more efficient pollinators than honey bees and other pollinators are, and they cover more area. They're gentle, non-aggressive and don't require the same kind of care or equipment that honey bees require.

Why Attract Mason Bees FAQ | Minga Skill Building Hub

https://www.ecolandscaping.org/03/be...e-gear-needed/

.
Okay. I just googled and discovered that what are called mason bees, in New Zealand, are actually a solitary wasp. They make mud cells, and tranquilize spiders to lay their eggs in. Very noisy, and their nests can be found in the hundreds around the house - definitely a sound of summer.

No actual mason bees in NZ, although bee decline has never been enough of an issue to cause poor pollination. Even during winter, there are still plenty of bees at work.
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Old 03-10-2018, 01:34 AM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
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We have those kinds of wasps here too, we call them mud dauber wasps. They can often be annoying.

Mason bees are cute little solitary bees that are known to be super-pollinators.

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Old 03-10-2018, 07:25 AM
 
Location: NC
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Mason bees are highly destructive. Have an exposed 2x4? They will drill a hole 3/4 inch in then go sideways several feet. You don't need to ask what that does for the strength of the lumber. I would never try to attract them.
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Old 03-10-2018, 07:34 AM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,498 posts, read 26,102,510 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luv4horses View Post
Mason bees are highly destructive. Have an exposed 2x4? They will drill a hole 3/4 inch in then go sideways several feet. You don't need to ask what that does for the strength of the lumber. I would never try to attract them.
I think you mean carpenter bees.

Mason bees:

Resources | Mason Bee Central
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Old 03-10-2018, 07:38 AM
 
Location: Maryland
806 posts, read 238,696 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luv4horses View Post
Mason bees are highly destructive. Have an exposed 2x4? They will drill a hole 3/4 inch in then go sideways several feet. You don't need to ask what that does for the strength of the lumber. I would never try to attract them.
I think you might be thinking of Carpenter Bees. They can be a huge nuisance because they burrow into wood planks on exposed framing, outdoor furniture and decks. Mason Bees look for existing holes and nooks they can use. A small nest of collections of hollow bamboo will attract mason Bees for sure. Carpenter Bees just bore a hole wherever they feel like it.

Edit: oops, someone beat me to it.
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