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Old 07-09-2016, 08:32 PM
 
550 posts, read 274,408 times
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Hi everyone!

I will be a first time mover anytime after May 2017 (when I finish college) and I was wondering what one should do on a first time trip to a new area? I will have more trips to come after this one, but this is the first and I want to make sure I do as much as I can.

I will be visiting for two half days and two full days. I will be driving my own car there which is why two of the days will be half days as its about a four hour drive haha. I'm planning on looking at apartments (already got a list). I'm not sure what I should really look for or do on this trip beside look at apartments so any advice would be great!

Thanks!
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Old 07-10-2016, 03:51 AM
 
4,787 posts, read 9,297,319 times
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If you're moving to someplace that has seasons, take your trip during in the worst season of the year. It's called a dose of reality. Example, don't go to Florida in January, go in August. Don't go to Boston in the summer, go in January.

If you plan on finding a job in that area, look up the places where working could be a possibility. Drive to those places during rush hour on a Monday morning . See what the commutes might be like.

Yes, driving around and looking neighborhoods, is good. Drive through during the day but also on Saturday nights. Everything looks nice on Wednesday AM- it's the weekend nights when you see who is really around and how noisy or congested it might be.

If you find some nice neighborhoods, check out how far they are to things you might like to do- parks, bike paths, shopping, clubs, etc. If at all possible, make multiple trips to places you might like. Good luck
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Old 07-10-2016, 04:28 AM
 
550 posts, read 274,408 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by willow wind View Post
If you're moving to someplace that has seasons, take your trip during in the worst season of the year. It's called a dose of reality. Example, don't go to Florida in January, go in August. Don't go to Boston in the summer, go in January.

If you plan on finding a job in that area, look up the places where working could be a possibility. Drive to those places during rush hour on a Monday morning . See what the commutes might be like.

Yes, driving around and looking neighborhoods, is good. Drive through during the day but also on Saturday nights. Everything looks nice on Wednesday AM- it's the weekend nights when you see who is really around and how noisy or congested it might be.

If you find some nice neighborhoods, check out how far they are to things you might like to do- parks, bike paths, shopping, clubs, etc. If at all possible, make multiple trips to places you might like. Good luck
Thanks for the tips! I will be there on Friday and Satruday night so I can check the areas I like out at night and see how busy everything or not busy it gets.

I'm moving somewhere that has very similar seasons to where I like now. Just heard it's more rainy and maybe less hot in the summer which would be nice haha.

I am planning on getting a job. Would like to get one before I move, but I've heard it's hard when you don't live in that state. However, as soon as I finish college I will start applying to jobs and then I will make another trip to job hunt.

How many scouting trips would you say is best? I'm thinking of doing at least 3 trips.
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Old 07-10-2016, 04:41 AM
 
4,787 posts, read 9,297,319 times
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Three trips is good.
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Old 07-10-2016, 08:00 AM
 
Location: Dallas, TX and Las Vegas, NV
5,695 posts, read 4,415,996 times
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I have noticed that towns without a fair amount of unique shops and restaurants -- those with just a small smattering as opposed to chain stores --- tend to have fewer single people that are hip or interesting. JMHO.
Same thing for towns without bike lanes or at least lots of people riding bikes, and ditto for towns without good walking paths.


Once you are shopping for an apartment take a mental note of how many school zones you will need to drive thru from your apartment to the job. Note if you would need to cross railroad tracks. I know people who regretted not knowing this stuff and when their lease renewed they moved over these issues (especially the RR crossings) because they found it frustrating waiting so much of the time while on the way to work.
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Old 07-10-2016, 08:07 AM
 
Location: Blue Ridge Mountains
1,827 posts, read 2,616,901 times
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How exciting!!! Find a SAFE area! Good luck!!! WOOOOHOOO
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Old 07-10-2016, 08:15 AM
 
550 posts, read 274,408 times
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Originally Posted by WorldKlas View Post
I have noticed that towns without a fair amount of unique shops and restaurants -- those with just a small smattering as opposed to chain stores --- tend to have fewer single people that are hip or interesting. JMHO.
Same thing for towns without bike lanes or at least lots of people riding bikes, and ditto for towns without good walking paths.


Once you are shopping for an apartment take a mental note of how many school zones you will need to drive thru from your apartment to the job. Note if you would need to cross railroad tracks. I know people who regretted not knowing this stuff and when their lease renewed they moved over these issues (especially the RR crossings) because they found it frustrating waiting so much of the time while on the way to work.
Ahha railroad tracks! We have a light rail where I live and some of my back ways get caught by it and it does add time to my trips. Good tip, I will have to keep that in mind.

Does how good the school district is in the area have a lot to do with how safe or nice an area is? I don't have kids and won't have them so the schools rating aren't an issue but I was wondering that. I know where I live we have a two school with a lot of walkers and if your by there anytime they let out it can add time. I try to avoid school zones when they open and close haha.

Thanks for the tips
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Old 07-10-2016, 08:20 AM
 
Location: Dallas, TX and Las Vegas, NV
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Frankly, I would avoid living in good school districts as a young single. Because that means living in Familyville.
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Old 07-10-2016, 09:33 AM
 
5,819 posts, read 5,181,776 times
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Go to the places where you would normally go to in your daily life in the neighborhoods you are considering.

That means: go to the grocery stores and drug stores. Check out laundramats, cafes, parks and the kinds of shops you like to visit. Do you feel welcomed there? Are they clean? Do you feel safe? Would you feel comfortable walking or biking around there? And how's the traffic in the area? Is it easy to get around or to work?

Before you commit to a specific apartment, definitely go there in the evening. Are there bars/street lights/party houses/ or too much traffic that would keep you awake at night?

And talk to people. Talk to people at the gas station, at the grocery store, at restaurants, and at bus stops, etc. How do they like where they work? Would they live there? Where do they recommend living or avoiding? What are the fun things to do?

Good luck, and have fun!
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Old 07-10-2016, 12:54 PM
 
Location: OH>IL>CO>CT
5,232 posts, read 8,395,972 times
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Have you yet looked to see if there is a C-D Forum for the city/area you are interested in ? There could be a lot of existing threads you could search regarding specifics of that area.

For instance, the Forum for Denver gets about 3 inquiries a DAY from folks looking to relocate there.

Also, have you tried https://www.padmapper.com/ to research apts. ?
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