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Old 04-29-2013, 11:05 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia
11,888 posts, read 10,402,608 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
I don't mean areas which have "ghetto-acting" whites. I mean areas which have huge amounts of vacant lots and falling-down buildings in disrepair. Kensington is rough, and still has a working-class white population in places, but it's intact, and not even that bad looking.

Pittsburgh actually has some working-class, majority-white neighborhoods which are more dangerous (Carrick, or Arlington, for example). They don't have urban decay however - they look fairly intact and have multiracial gangs fighting with each other.
Oh, OK I could see why Kensington wouldn't fit in that sense. Especially recently it has become increasingly Hispanic and is now feeling the effects of gentrification.
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Old 04-29-2013, 11:06 AM
 
Location: Baltimore / Montgomery County, MD
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The Baltimore area has plenty.
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Old 04-29-2013, 11:09 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
How is that different from what you were looking for? Or did you want obvious abandonment?
I suppose it's not. The only thing is dying mill towns tend to be small urban areas which are fairly geographically isolated from a wider metropolitan area. Because of their isolation, they don't attract either gentrifiers or nonwhite migrants in large numbers. In contrast, I was linking to actual neighborhoods within the city of Pittsburgh. East Deutschtown is only 1.2 miles from downtown - you can walk there in 25 minutes!

Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
Niagara Falls is 69% white and considering its very large population decline, it's likely there are "ghetto" white neighborhoods.
True enough. I can't say I've ever lingered long enough in Niagara Falls to know much about it.
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Old 04-29-2013, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Here's another one. Four Mile Run. It's hidden in a valley between Oakland (the major student neighborhood in the city) and Greenfield (stable, lower-middle class area with historically some of the best-perceived public schools in the city). It's only a 10-minute drive to downtown (3.5 miles or so), has access to riverfront trials, and is right next to one of the largest parks in the city. It's an overwhelmingly white (historically Rusyn - Andy Warhol's family was from here) enclave, where nearly every house is a falling-apart frame beast from the 19th century. It's more of a dying holler town somehow stuck in the city, whereas East Deutschtown or Spring Garden are more clearly urban, but it's still kind of odd to find in a major U.S. city.
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Old 04-29-2013, 11:34 AM
 
Location: Denver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by creeksitter View Post
It is kind of rascist to presume most poor people will be minorities.
This isn't about poor people, this is about ghettos. Just because someone is poor doesn't mean they live in the hood. To me, a modern ghetto is defined by socioeconomic status as well as a prevalent crime problem.
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Old 04-29-2013, 12:44 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,226 posts, read 17,981,442 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Here's another one. Four Mile Run. It's hidden in a valley between Oakland (the major student neighborhood in the city) and Greenfield (stable, lower-middle class area with historically some of the best-perceived public schools in the city). It's only a 10-minute drive to downtown (3.5 miles or so), has access to riverfront trials, and is right next to one of the largest parks in the city. It's an overwhelmingly white (historically Rusyn - Andy Warhol's family was from here) enclave, where nearly every house is a falling-apart frame beast from the 19th century. It's more of a dying holler town somehow stuck in the city, whereas East Deutschtown or Spring Garden are more clearly urban, but it's still kind of odd to find in a major U.S. city.
You know what else the places you've mentioned have in common? They're all stuck in ravines, and they're off the beaten paths. They're the last bastions of "old Pittsburgh." They're forgotten and forgettable because they're so easy to pass by, and they have little other than ruins to make them interesting.
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Old 04-29-2013, 12:50 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gnutella View Post
You know what else the places you've mentioned have in common? They're all stuck in ravines, and they're off the beaten paths. They're the last bastions of "old Pittsburgh." They're forgotten and forgettable because they're so easy to pass by, and they have little other than ruins to make them interesting.
East Deutschtown isn't stuck in a ravine, or off the beaten path. Admittedly, it is cut off from downtown (as well as the riverfront) due to the way the highways worked out, but it's otherwise pretty much in the center of things.

That said, the oldest development in Pittsburgh did tend to follow the ravines. As such, much of it was at risk of getting run down, and where it wasn't leveled to build state roads or highways, hasn't aged nearly as well as things in "the flats" or up on plateaus.
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Old 04-29-2013, 01:08 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,226 posts, read 17,981,442 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
East Deutschtown isn't stuck in a ravine, or off the beaten path. Admittedly, it is cut off from downtown (as well as the riverfront) due to the way the highways worked out, but it's otherwise pretty much in the center of things.

That said, the oldest development in Pittsburgh did tend to follow the ravines. As such, much of it was at risk of getting run down, and where it wasn't leveled to build state roads or highways, hasn't aged nearly as well as things in "the flats" or up on plateaus.
East Deutschtown is at the mouth of the ravine where Spring Garden is, and it's separated from the rest of Deutschtown by I-279, so it might as well just be an extension of Spring Garden at this point. At least they have a cool microbrewery and an authentic German restaurant there.

There are two "yinzer corridors" left in Allegheny County:


PA 28
The city neighborhoods of Troy Hill, Spring Hill and Spring Garden, plus outlying municipalities like Millvale, Reserve Township, Etna, Sharpsburg, Shaler Township, Harmar Township, Cheswick, Springdale, Natrona Heights and Tarentum. (Fox Chapel, Aspinwall and O'Hara Township are a pocket of wealth in the middle of it all.)

PA 51
The city neighborhoods of Carrick and Overbrook, plus outlying municipalities like Brentwood, Whitehall, Baldwin, Munhall, West Mifflin, Elizabeth, Elizabeth Township and Forward Township. (Jefferson Hills and parts of Pleasant Hills are more upper-middle-class.)


Not coincidentally, both those highways lead into the two least populous corners of Allegheny County.
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Old 04-29-2013, 01:40 PM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
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For Dayton...where to start?

OK, lets start in the suburbs: The western suburb of Drexel. Sort of "failed suburbia"..just one step up from a shantytown (and I think parts of it really are a somewhat upgraded shantytown).

Most of the East Side of the city..the so-called "Inner East". Possibly some the most degraded white people you'll see...
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Old 04-29-2013, 01:42 PM
 
Location: "Daytonnati"
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For Louisville, it would be the Portland neighborhood.
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