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Old 06-15-2017, 08:36 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,061 posts, read 3,392,125 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gene Chode View Post
I also want to bring up the subject of homogenization as well . That is the topic of whether rural culture in the USA is starting to become standardized or not . For example I've heard that there are people in Pennsylvania and New York state that display Confederate flags on their front porches , which leads to the question of whether rural culture in the USA is becoming Southernized or not .

I realize this might be a bit of a silly example , but it's a fact that certain cultural symbols and forms that are heavily associated with the South can be found throughout the country . I mean I bet that every state has a country music station , in spite of that genre being a Southern ( and to some extent ) Western invention .

Nahh, they're probably just racist.
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Old 06-15-2017, 08:58 PM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
21,135 posts, read 21,894,255 times
Reputation: 23217
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gene Chode View Post
Everyone knows that rural culture in the USA is closely associated with ( oftentimes cliche ) Southern and " redneck " things . Evangelical Christianity , NASCAR , country music, and all that . Yet it makes me wonder if that's true for the country as a whole .


So is there still a wide variety of rural cultures/cultural groups throughout the USA ? Or has rural culture become much the same all over ?
Rural culture is as individual as the area or neighborhood. I live in a town with a pretty well known music barn but we have been here more than 40 years and have never been there and it is less than a mile away. I don't really like Blue Grass music. We also have a golf course that people come to from far off because they say it is a really good course and I have been there twice. Once was a wedding reception and the other time our sil came to visit and we all decided to get a few buckets of balls and use the driving range.

Down the road is a lake with a beach and lifeguard, picnic tables, paddle boats, putt, putt golf, playground, etc. Some summers our children almost lived there. They had swim lessons and a day camp. There is also overnight camping. Some people in the area use it to camp rather than drive their campers long distances.

www.queenscup.com We have been to this a couple of times. We watch the traffic and can hear the loud speaker from our patio. Race day is always exciting whether we go there or not. Our area has housing developments where the common area is a horse stable instead of a pool.

Our area also has churches and all the activities that go with that including scouts. There are organized sports of just about anything using a ball, soccer, football, baseball, softball plus school sports during the school year.

I forgot to mention our walking and riding trails.

People brag about our pizza stand that is supposed to have the best New York pizza around. It is just too greasy for us.

Last edited by NCN; 06-15-2017 at 09:06 PM..
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Old 06-16-2017, 07:18 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,607 posts, read 17,589,896 times
Reputation: 27682
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gene Chode View Post
I also want to bring up the subject of homogenization as well . That is the topic of whether rural culture in the USA is starting to become standardized or not . For example I've heard that there are people in Pennsylvania and New York state that display Confederate flags on their front porches , which leads to the question of whether rural culture in the USA is becoming Southernized or not .

I realize this might be a bit of a silly example , but it's a fact that certain cultural symbols and forms that are heavily associated with the South can be found throughout the country . I mean I bet that every state has a country music station , in spite of that genre being a Southern ( and to some extent ) Western invention .
To a point, I think it is. I've lived in small towns in South Carolina, Virginia, and am from a small town in Tennessee. Been to dozens of small towns across OH, MI, IN, IL, KY.

Honestly, you see Confederate flags in the north as well - not to the same frequency, but they're there. People in rural areas tend to be more self-reliant and suspicious of government. Yes, the regionalisms add flavor, but core beliefs are fairly similar.
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Old 06-16-2017, 07:37 AM
 
56,672 posts, read 80,973,859 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Nahh, they're probably just racist.
and/or are former Southerners or descendants for such that live in rural PA or NY. People forget that white Southerners migrated North do some degree as well.
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Old 06-16-2017, 07:56 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,436 posts, read 11,937,287 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Nahh, they're probably just racist.
People always forget that up until the Civil Rights Movement, essentially no one besides Civil War reenactors flew the Stars and Bars for nearly 90 years.
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Old 06-16-2017, 08:01 AM
 
56,672 posts, read 80,973,859 times
Reputation: 12521
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
You can find it elsewhere, but not to the same degree in terms of percentages and geography.
Here are some places that fit this criteria in terms of non Southern small/rural towns with substantial to high black percentages: Covert Twp > Home
Covert, Michigan: A History in Black and White : NPR
https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/...w.xhtml?src=CF (was 38.1% Black only and part in 2000)
https://www.google.com/maps/@42.2942...7i13312!8i6656


http://www.city-data.com/city/Baldwin-Michigan.html
Village of Baldwin, Michigan
https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/...w.xhtml?src=CF
https://www.google.com/maps/@43.8952...!7i3328!8i1664


Village of Cassopolis
https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/...w.xhtml?src=CF
https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9117...7i13312!8i6656


Village of Vandalia, Michigan - Home
https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/...w.xhtml?src=CF
https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9180...7i13312!8i6656


Village of Monticello, New York
Village of Monticello, New York
https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/...w.xhtml?src=CF
https://www.google.com/maps/@41.6557...7i13312!8i6656


Village of Chester NY
https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/...w.xhtml?src=CF
https://www.google.com/maps/@41.3558...7i13312!8i6656


There are some others in states like IL, MO, OH and maybe a few others that aren't in the South.
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Old 06-16-2017, 09:49 AM
 
173 posts, read 91,405 times
Reputation: 188
Rural MN feels nothing like rural AL.
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Old 06-16-2017, 10:39 AM
 
29,946 posts, read 27,406,003 times
Reputation: 18529
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
People always forget that up until the Civil Rights Movement, essentially no one besides Civil War reenactors flew the Stars and Bars for nearly 90 years.
Yep. Just read a good article on the subject: The Confederate flag largely disappeared after the Civil War. The fight against civil rights brought it back. - The Washington Post
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Old 06-16-2017, 10:41 AM
 
Location: The Dirty South.
1,573 posts, read 1,430,903 times
Reputation: 1097
Quote:
Originally Posted by WizardOfRadical View Post
California has the most diverse rural culture.

Many rurual valley towns filled with asians, blacks, arabs, and latinos. Places like Tracy and Manteca.

Lots of granola hippy rural areas.

Lota of rural coastal areas filled with surfers, fishermen, redneckers, and latinos.

Foothill towns filled with hill folk.

California is just so much more amazing than where everywhere else is. No other state has the unique mix of people in rural areas.
You obviously haven't been to Texas if you think California is the only to offer that. And lol at California having rednecks.
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Old 06-16-2017, 11:20 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,436 posts, read 11,937,287 times
Reputation: 10542
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrfoe View Post
And lol at California having rednecks.
Never been to Bakersfield then? It's practically Oklahoma.
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