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Old 06-02-2006, 12:38 PM
 
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Question Hurricanes a problem in SE Georgia (Kings Bay/St. Simons area)?

Are Hurricanes a problem on the SE Georgia coast or is that just a big problem in the Gulf Coast?
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Old 06-02-2006, 01:09 PM
 
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For some reason, the Georgia coast doesn't get too many hurricanes, relative to Florida, SC, and NC. It may just be because of the short coastline - I'm not sure. The only hurricane to pass directly over Georgia since 1950 was Category 2 Hurricane David in 1979.

The Atlantic coast gets just as many hurricanes as the gulf coast.

http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/img/climate...er/hur5004.jpg
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Old 06-02-2006, 01:58 PM
 
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Thanks for the map. That was the major thing I was afraid of about moving. I feel much better now.
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Old 06-02-2006, 02:24 PM
 
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jonw, check out one of the threads in the SC forum if you'd like more detail involving hurricanes.

just because there hasn't been one in Georgia for a while doesn't mean it can't/won't happen. There's certainly nothing stopping it, and if it happens you definitely need to evacuate. It's something you oughta be informed about and aware of, but not something to be preoccupied with, IMO.
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Old 06-02-2006, 04:27 PM
 
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One thing the Georgia coast has over the other coasts is the barrier islands. Even if a hurricane did come directly at the coasts the barrier islands help to weaken the blow. The natural topography of the region makes it very unlikely that a hurricane will hit the coast but like somebody else said it is always possible.
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Old 06-02-2006, 10:33 PM
 
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Thanks for the info guys!!!
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Old 06-03-2006, 12:50 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xxman777
One thing the Georgia coast has over the other coasts is the barrier islands. Even if a hurricane did come directly at the coasts the barrier islands help to weaken the blow. The natural topography of the region makes it very unlikely that a hurricane will hit the coast but like somebody else said it is always possible.

Interesting. North and South Carolina have extensive barrier Islands. Even North Florida, Virginia, Maryland and New Jersey have some.

And I wouldn't say topography has anything to do with the frequency or likelihood of a hurricane. It might affect the extent of the damage. Personally I think it's been luck of the draw.
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Old 06-03-2006, 03:49 PM
 
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The barrier islands can only soften the blow of a hurricane. They won't stop it they just decrease the effect of the storm. I was only commenting that Georgia has barrier islands which most parts of Flordia and a lot of areas on the gulf coast do not.

The topography which I was refering was location and size of Georgia's coastline. The coast is much smaller then either of the Carolina's or Flordia's. This of course lowers the probability of a hurricane reaching land. The Georgia coast is farther to the west then any other part of the east coast protecting it from hurricanes. Hurricanes first start their creation off the coast of Africa. As they come accross the Atlantic they generally head in a direction that is farther south then Georgia. As they get closer they either turn north or stay in a western path. If they stay on the western path they will hit Flordia or go into the gulf. If they hit Flordia they will do one of three things, dissipate, move accross Flordia into the gulf, or bounce off Flordia and head north. When they bounce off Flordia and head north they won't hit Georgia because Georgia's coast is to the west not north. If the storm had turned north before hitting Georgia it is more likely to hit the Carolina's, Virginia, Maryland or New Jersey because they are north. There is a very small window for a storm to hit Georgia which is why it is unlikely.

It is much more complicated then I am making it, but what it really comes down to is hurricane's naturally skip over Georgia. In a way you are right. Georgia was lucky to have a coastline which is smaller and farther to the west then the rest of the east coast making it much less prone to hurricanes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by anonymous
Interesting. North and South Carolina have extensive barrier Islands. Even North Florida, Virginia, Maryland and New Jersey have some.

And I wouldn't say topography has anything to do with the frequency or likelihood of a hurricane. It might affect the extent of the damage. Personally I think it's been luck of the draw.
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Old 06-05-2006, 01:54 PM
 
Location: West Cobb County, GA (Atlanta metro)
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My understanding of it is that due to the size/shape of the GA coast, it helps to steer hurricanes away a bit north as they approach. A strong enough one heading straight-on though, I'm sure would still just plow on in.

The worst is Wilmington NC, which geographically just sticks right on out there and seems to be a magnet for the things. Savannah is a bit recessed and avoids them for the most part, but as someone else said, it's not impossible and could happen at any time, especially considering the goofy weather and climate changes earth has had lately (which the government would never admit to the public to avoid panic).

One thing is clear though - home insurance prices are going up A LOT among coastal areas, so check into that BEFORE you relocate - in some areas some insurance companies are not even granting new policies at all. Making sure you have proper "flood" and hurricane insurance if you do get it, is essential in any coastal area regardless of if it gets hit frequently or not.
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Old 06-22-2006, 09:05 PM
 
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from what I have heard Georgia's coast doesnt get hit by hurricanes because it sits further west than any other coast on the East. Hurricanes hit Florida or the Carolinas before they hit Georgia.
My parents who have a condo on Jekyll Island said that the last hurricane to hit that area was over 100 years ago.
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