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Old 11-27-2009, 09:37 AM
 
Location: Lethbridge, AB
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you may be right about that.
This is becoming a frustrating question, in that there seems to be lots of information about quebec, but virtually nothing about the English colonies that didn't join
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Old 11-27-2009, 11:34 AM
 
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In Nova Scotia, the Acadiens (Cajuns) were sent packing starting in 1755 so the lands could be settled by Loyalists.
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Old 11-27-2009, 01:54 PM
 
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Lots of great answers from everyone as i appreciate the responses.

Also if memory serves me correctly and that is once France entered the war that there were independence uprisings against Great Britain in the Indies but that either Commander in Chief Howe or Clinton sent some 5,000 troops down there to crush them which ended their short bid for independence.

Does that sound correct?
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Old 11-28-2009, 12:47 PM
 
13 posts, read 61,790 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 6 FOOT 3 View Post
Lots of great answers from everyone as i appreciate the responses.

Also if memory serves me correctly and that is once France entered the war that there were independence uprisings against Great Britain in the Indies but that either Commander in Chief Howe or Clinton sent some 5,000 troops down there to crush them which ended their short bid for independence.

Does that sound correct?
Yes, there was a bit of negotiating for those islands in 1783 with the French, English and Spanish with the English gaining a foothold in Florida.
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Old 02-16-2013, 10:17 PM
 
Location: Kingston, ON
408 posts, read 447,423 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by j_k_k View Post
The availability of Tim Horton's tended to pacify them and make them less resentful of Royal authority, tea taxation and the long time it was taking to get hockey invented.
Actually, Timmy's didn't make its debut until 1964.
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Old 02-17-2013, 08:06 PM
Status: "My eyes are rolled back so far I can see my brain." (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Here.
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Because the merchants living in those areas were not wealthy enough to fund a war to protect their commerce from taxation.
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Old 02-19-2013, 04:06 PM
 
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Florida had very few British settlers and was only in British control for a short period of time from roughly 1763-1783. It was originally a Spanish colony acquired by Britain as a result of a peace settlement. When the U.S. defeated Britain in the American Revolution, Spain regained control of Florida for nearly 40 years. The U.S. did not get Florida until 1819.

The simple answer to your question is that there were too few British settlers in Florida to make a difference. There were far more Seminole Indians inhabiting Florida at the time. In fact, when the U.S. ceded Florida from Spain, the U.S. military had to go to war against the Seminole Indians lead by Chief Osceola to gain control of Florida. The Seminoles were a formidable military force and it took 3 separate invasions over a course of years for the U.S. Army to defeat them.

In fact, the modern day cities of Miami, Fort Lauderdale, and West Palm Beach were originally U.S. Army forts set up as bases to launch the invasion forces against the Seminoles.
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Old 08-08-2018, 12:35 PM
 
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
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In fact, the colonies made several overtures to both E and W Florida and were rebuffed.
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Old 08-08-2018, 06:44 PM
 
Location: Parts Unknown, Northern California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nolefan34 View Post

In fact, the modern day cities of Miami, Fort Lauderdale, and West Palm Beach were originally U.S. Army forts set up as bases to launch the invasion forces against the Seminoles.
Greater Miami is in Dade County, named for Major Francis L. Dade who was killed in the Second Seminole War. Dade and 108 of his 110 men were ambushed and killed when he was leading them from one fort to another.

I grew up in Miami and wondered about Dade. He seemed to qualify as a martyr, but not as a hero. What made him famous was leading his command into an ambush and getting them wiped out.
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Old 08-09-2018, 12:34 AM
 
Location: Independent Republic of Ballard
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Washington and the Continental Congress did receive emissaries from Nova Scotia requesting assistance in becoming the "14th Colony" in the rebellion. Likely fearing over-extension (the attack on Quebec had just failed), no assistance was offered or given.

Quote:
In March 1776, a delegation of Nova Scotians eager to lead a rebellion in their colony arrived at Washington’s headquarters in Cambridge just as the British were evacuating Boston. As recounted by historian Ernest Clarke in his book The Siege of Fort Cumberland 1776, the delegation—Jonathan Eddy, Isaiah Boudreau and Samuel Rogers—met several times with the general in a building at Harvard College. But Washington was pre-occupied with where the British fleet, still anchored in Boston Harbor, would head next.
Three-fourths of Nova Scotians were ex-New Englanders, who'd been settled to replace the exiled Acadians. What sympathies they had for the Revolutionary cause, however, were spoiled by the actions of American privateers.

Quote:
Still, perhaps the biggest reason that Nova Scotians didn’t join the Americans may have been the Americans themselves. At the time, American privateers operating out of New England ports were ravaging Nova Scotia’s coast. “The privateers come early on in the conflict,” says Conrad. While they couldn’t stand up to the British fleet, “they could do a lot of damage in hit-and-run raids.”

They didn’t discriminate against loyalists, neutrals or those inclined to support the patriot cause, either. Nor did Congress, Washington or anyone else seem able to control them. “Numerous settlements received nocturnal visits from the heartless New Englanders,” wrote historian John Dewar Faibisy. “They entered harbors, rivers and coves, committing various depredations on land, burning vessels in port and at sea seizing valuable prizes.”
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/histo...ion-180963564/
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