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Old 07-24-2010, 07:31 PM
 
6 posts, read 44,100 times
Reputation: 13
Default Unique quarter round issue...

Hi all,

Have a question that I haven't found an answer to yet. I'm installing a floating wood floor and just need to finish off the quarter round. The problem I'm having you will see in the attached photos. What to do (cut wise) with the quarter round when it meets up with T-molding (especially when that junction is at an angle).

The traditional 22 degree end cut just doesn't look good. I'm thinking of possibly overlaying the quarter round over the edge of the T-molding... looks better but would be a major pain to hand fit each corner that I have. Another thought was to cut the quarter round at a 45 degree and have it butt up against the T-molding (leaving a small triangle to somehow fill).

Would greatly appreciate any advise someone can give me. My apologies if this has been answered elsewhere, I'm still in a "searching this forum" mode. Sorry about the graininess of the photos as well, I only had my iPhone on hand to take these low light photos...

Thanks,

David
Attached Thumbnails
Unique quarter round issue...-img_0041.jpg   Unique quarter round issue...-img_0042.jpg   Unique quarter round issue...-img_0043.jpg  
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Old 07-24-2010, 07:50 PM
 
Location: Destrehan, Louisiana
2,192 posts, read 3,499,481 times
Reputation: 3479
Remove the t-molding, install the 1/4 round and cut the t-molding to fit 1/4 round.


busta
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Old 07-24-2010, 10:11 PM
 
109 posts, read 257,460 times
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If you were to really plan in advance you could take a door jamb saw(assuming you have or could get one) notch out the baseboard in that spot and let the board go under the baseboard.That way, you could 22.5 or 45 it, not worrying about any gaps.
That being said, try rotating the quarter round a 1/4 turn, 22.5 or 45 it and see how that angle works.Done that plenty of times in awkward situations.
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Old 07-24-2010, 11:13 PM
 
Location: Destrehan, Louisiana
2,192 posts, read 3,499,481 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bjive View Post
If you were to really plan in advance you could take a door jamb saw(assuming you have or could get one) notch out the baseboard in that spot and let the board go under the baseboard.That way, you could 22.5 or 45 it, not worrying about any gaps.
That being said, try rotating the quarter round a 1/4 turn, 22.5 or 45 it and see how that angle works.Done that plenty of times in awkward situations.

Don't take this the wrong way, but I fail to see how cutting out the base with a jamb saw will solve the problem.

At 23 seconds in this video shows the correct way for installing 1/4 round and t-molding. Notice how the 1/4 round is installed first then the t-molding is cut to fit the 1/4 round.


YouTube - How to Install a T-molding - Glue Down


busta
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Old 07-25-2010, 06:50 AM
 
Location: Central Fl
2,900 posts, read 6,344,757 times
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Since the T moulding is already down, you could easily use a coping saw and nicely cut the bottom of the quarter round the contour of the T moulding. Then cut the angle as you see fit, (or just round it as it touches the corner). Done.

This is way easier then you think. I use a coping saw all the time to cope corners.....joints look much better, do not open, and there is a pride in doing it "old style". Despite what you think, it is not difficult. Try it.

Frank
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Old 07-25-2010, 10:19 AM
 
Location: Destrehan, Louisiana
2,192 posts, read 3,499,481 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by faithfulFrank View Post
Since the T moulding is already down, you could easily use a coping saw and nicely cut the bottom of the quarter round the contour of the T moulding. Then cut the angle as you see fit, (or just round it as it touches the corner). Done.

This is way easier then you think. I use a coping saw all the time to cope corners.....joints look much better, do not open, and there is a pride in doing it "old style". Despite what you think, it is not difficult. Try it.

Frank

Yep that will work also, more than one way to skin a cat.

busta
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Old 07-25-2010, 01:35 PM
 
6 posts, read 44,100 times
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Thanks to all for your responses...

@bustaduke:

Thank you for the video post. I had not seen that one on You Tube. Unfortunately, this method will not work because my floor butts up to pre-existing tile. There is a difference of about 1/4 inch between the two. Hence my reason for wanting to stop at the molding...

@faithfulFrank:

That was another thought I had. I'm already coping my corners so coping the bottom, as you say, shouldn't be too difficult. I'll give that a try and see what looks good.

Another thought that I'm playing with is taking the angle cut and putting it on the top of the quarter round instead of on the face. The three pictures show what this would look like. Pictures "Trim01 and 02" show a compound cut with the top tilted at a 45 degree angle. "Trim03" show the same compound cut but tilted at ~22.5 degrees. Seems to soften the look while still providing the needed edge coverage... I may try trimming the point to a flat face (shoulder) that would be the same height as the T-molding and see how that looks...

The one other thing I'm trying to figure out is - If I overlap the quarter round on top of the T-molding, how far towards the edge should I go??? I don't know if there is some sort of industry standard or if it is merely what looks best.
Attached Thumbnails
Unique quarter round issue...-trim01.jpg   Unique quarter round issue...-trim02.jpg   Unique quarter round issue...-trim03.jpg  
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Old 07-25-2010, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Visitation between Wal-Mart & Home Depot
8,310 posts, read 20,710,815 times
Reputation: 6634
Quote:
Originally Posted by faithfulFrank View Post
Since the T moulding is already down, you could easily use a coping saw and nicely cut the bottom of the quarter round the contour of the T moulding. Then cut the angle as you see fit, (or just round it as it touches the corner). Done.

This is way easier then you think. I use a coping saw all the time to cope corners.....joints look much better, do not open, and there is a pride in doing it "old style". Despite what you think, it is not difficult. Try it.

Frank
This is essentially what I was thinking. You could still do the "traditional" termination miter but nibble out a recess for the t moulding. A router would really make shorter work than the coping saw if you have multiple corners like this one, but I agree that there is more pride (and, in this case, less danger) in hand work.

Out of curiousity: Is that a baby gate in the corner?
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Old 07-25-2010, 02:41 PM
 
Location: Central Fl
2,900 posts, read 6,344,757 times
Reputation: 2575
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcherokee View Post
The one other thing I'm trying to figure out is - If I overlap the quarter round on top of the T-molding, how far towards the edge should I go??? I don't know if there is some sort of industry standard or if it is merely what looks best.
As others have said, there are many ways to do this, just personal preference.

I would cope the bottom to conform to the T-moulding, using either a coping saw or a dremel tool. I would then cut off the quarter round where it meets the white corner trim, and just round it back and then stain it to match. With pine quarter round moulding, I use a minwax pre-stain treatment so the stain is not darker at the end grain then the face of the moulding.

Hope this helps.

Frank
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Old 07-25-2010, 03:01 PM
 
Location: Chicagoland
41,214 posts, read 23,856,245 times
Reputation: 6982
You do what's called a return;





To give it a finished look.
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