U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment > Job Search
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-31-2014, 09:25 AM
 
304 posts, read 301,092 times
Reputation: 542

Advertisements

Say I'm new to an area and have few contacts and networking opportunities to take advantage of. Simultaneously, I also have negligible marketable skills. Would cold-calling smaller businesses who may not have much in the way of formal hiring practices be advisable? In 'What Color is Your Parachute' the author has been saying for years now that it's actually one of the most effective ways to find work, but has anyone here actually successfully done this within the past say, 5 years? If so, how did it work out for you, and what kind of job did you get?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-31-2014, 09:51 AM
 
2 posts, read 2,611 times
Reputation: 15
Use anything and everything that successfully helps you obtain employment.

Prior to calling, research the company to find out what they do, and what their latest news is. Three questions to ask based on your research:

Will you fit well in this company
Does a position already exist you can apply for
Or
Can a best fit position be created for someone with your skills and talents

If you can readily answer yes to any of these questions; then cold calling this type of prospective employer may lead to you landing a meeting or interview that may lead to a job offer or a position being created.

Good luck in all of your pursuits and endeavors; and here's to you finding and landing your dream job. And if this works for you, come back to report and share your success!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-31-2014, 11:28 AM
 
248 posts, read 250,491 times
Reputation: 462
yes sure 100%
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-31-2014, 11:33 AM
 
Location: Fort Wayne
360 posts, read 618,939 times
Reputation: 478
With 'negligible marketable skills" (your words) even if you cold call employers, you aren't going to appeal to them as you have very little to offer them. It would be better for you to build up your skill sets by working at lower wage jobs and going to school until your are able to present a solid package (being yourself and your skills) to a potential employer.

In easier economic times or in an "boom" area, no having many skills would be far less of a hindrance than it would be right now or the foreseeable future. If you plan on moving to a boom area, then you might be able to cold call your way into interviews. Outside of that, you are going to need skills for the majority of employers to bother having any interest in you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-31-2014, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Eureka CA
7,090 posts, read 9,810,650 times
Reputation: 10367
How can it hurt? And maybe you can find an ally on the other end of the phone. I say, go for it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-31-2014, 04:04 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
2,279 posts, read 3,567,958 times
Reputation: 3990
I think it depends upon your field and what sort of position you're trying to get. I could see how it might work for something like sales.

I don't know anyone who has ever landed a professional job via cold calling. I have vague memories of a former college roommate cold-calling all of the stores at the mall to find out who was hiring, and she did wind up applying at a few of those stores and one ultimately hired her, though.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-31-2014, 07:54 PM
 
304 posts, read 301,092 times
Reputation: 542
Quote:
Originally Posted by fortwaynebandit View Post
With 'negligible marketable skills" (your words) even if you cold call employers, you aren't going to appeal to them as you have very little to offer them. It would be better for you to build up your skill sets by working at lower wage jobs and going to school until your are able to present a solid package (being yourself and your skills) to a potential employer.

In easier economic times or in an "boom" area, no having many skills would be far less of a hindrance than it would be right now or the foreseeable future. If you plan on moving to a boom area, then you might be able to cold call your way into interviews. Outside of that, you are going to need skills for the majority of employers to bother having any interest in you.
Well, I'm exaggerating a bit. I have skills that are a dime a dozen - I can be a file clerk, a receptionist or administrative assistant... given the opportunity. I've been told I'm a decent writer, and it doesn't take me long to get the hang of a new software program. Right now, I'm a burnt out call center employee desperate for the opportunity to escape. I already have a Bachelors, and I've been trying to make my way in the world, to no avail. My area is not a "boom" area, but it's not busted either - I'm in TX, but I was only able to find my current position after the recession thawed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-31-2014, 08:16 PM
 
Location: Norwalk, CT
114 posts, read 112,038 times
Reputation: 105
This is totally one of the best ways to find a new position. And you hit the nail on the head by targeting smaller companies. It was more than five years ago, but I did this exact same thing and landed three interviews and one job offer. The thing is, smaller companies aren't all about this do everything online BS. Which I loathe BTW.

I was working a large insurance broker and found out our department was going to close. I scheduled a day off, pulled up a list of insurance agencies, brokers and carriers in the my county and got on the phone. I was polite, introduced myself and explained that I was interested in submitting my resume and wanted to know if they had any vacancies.

As luck would have it, quite a few of the companies had vacancies but weren't really advertising or looking for candidates. By the end of that week, I put in my notice and got out before they started handing out pink slips.

If you see a position you like online, apply online and then put a nice suit and show up to "just drop it off in person and see where the office is located"... If someone is available to speak with you, they will. You can also try to get a contact name, email, direct number, business card or anything else that will get your foot in the door.

I hope this helps Selena. Always keep in mind, you don't get what you don't ask for.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-31-2014, 08:59 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
27,081 posts, read 47,372,554 times
Reputation: 25936
I had a small business for 16 years, and never hired anyone that way. In fact it was annoying when people called. Think about it. Do you like getting telemarketers when you are eating dinner? It's the same for a business owner trying to get some work done interrupted by people, whether to sell insurance or faster internet, or looking for a job. When I needed someone I would announce an opening and people could apply.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-01-2014, 06:21 AM
 
4,578 posts, read 4,393,085 times
Reputation: 10419
When I moved to a place and needed work I cold called places, many places. This was in the late 1990's though. I didn't do much calling on the telephone, I went to the physical locations. Walked right in and introduced myself to whomever was there, gave them my resume and asked for what I wanted (in a nice way) - I told them my name, that I was looking for work, asked if they were hiring, and regardless of what they said I asked to meet with someone else about work.

I did not get a job that way. But it was a great experience and to me, was worth doing. It was hard at first but helped me gain confidence, speak well to people, practice my "pitch", and it got me out and about roaming the street with a nice suit and positive attitude. I thought it helped to build my persona and made me someone who was better able to connect with people.

Best of luck in your search.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Work and Employment > Job Search
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 - Top