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Old 11-04-2009, 07:18 PM
 
8 posts, read 14,509 times
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Hi all.

I'm sure my story is typical for these boards. I'm a recent college grad looking to move to NY in the next couple years. I'd like to live in Manhattan as I really like the very urban lifestyle, to be around people and commotion all the time, and I'd prefer to not have a long commute from one of the outer boroughs. I'm in software development and will have over 4 years of experience by the time I start applying for jobs. Right now, I'm hoping I could find a primary job that would pay at least $75-80k, and I think I'd try to get a second job for evenings/weekends as well for another $15-20k. I'd be looking for one bedroom/studio apartments to live in by myself in the $2000-$2500/month range. I'm saving as much money as possible and would be planning to set aside at least $10k to make the move (for security deposit/rent/moving costs).

Do any of these numbers sound unrealistic? What other major factors should I start considering very early? This has been a very strong idea in my mind for almost a year now. I plan to visit for my second time in a few months.

Thanks!
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Old 11-04-2009, 08:24 PM
 
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I always think it's good to start your professional life in NYC if that's where you want to be, rather than revving up somewhere else and hoping to switch over later.
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Old 11-04-2009, 10:14 PM
 
Location: Upper East, NY
1,144 posts, read 2,540,710 times
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Numbers look good and reasonable and based on today's prices, you could get a 1-bed in a pretty good neighborhood for $2000-2500. We don't see the words "saving money" here much, so kudos to you. $10k could be a little tight if you burn $7500 for first month/last month/security on a place, but that can be fixed.
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Old 11-05-2009, 07:11 PM
 
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Thanks. Yeah $2500 isn't a ton for moving costs but hopefully I'll have more than that free to spend. I wouldn't be exactly "starting" my professional career in NYC as I would have nearly two years of post-college experience before making the move, but it'd still be relatively early and hopefully a great time to do it.

If all my numbers look okay I guess my next biggest question is, does it make sense to want to live in central Manhattan? I feel like an outer borough would more resemble a type of neighborhood I'm already used to, and while that can be nice for some people, it isn't the urban engulfment I'm searching for. Or do you feel I'll get "over it" quite quickly and desire a cheaper, smaller neighborhood? I don't get overwhelmed or annoyed by city commotion and noise (at least when I'm not driving, that is), but I'd like to hear from someone else who has lived in a relatively central part of Manhattan and hear how they felt about it after 2+ years.
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Old 11-08-2009, 12:49 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn, New York
467 posts, read 1,655,337 times
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Why do you need to spend so much money on rent living by yourself? You can get a studio or even a small 1BR for well under $2,000. Why not rent something cheap for a year or two and then move up when things are more secure? You'll have more money. Or why not get a roommate for a year and save even more? When my boyfriend and I moved here in 2007 we split $1750/month and our highest has been $2400, for two, not one...
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Old 11-08-2009, 01:06 AM
 
10,630 posts, read 20,770,793 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by adl432 View Post
I feel like an outer borough would more resemble a type of neighborhood I'm already used to, and while that can be nice for some people, it isn't the urban engulfment I'm searching for.
If you're already pretty convinced Manhattan may be the only right place for you, you may be correct. There is nothing quite like Manhattan. However, unless you are used to living in a very large city already, then a place like Brooklyn might surprise you with its size, population and skyline. If Brooklyn were a city instead of a borough, it would be the 4th largest city in the US.
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Old 11-25-2009, 04:40 PM
 
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Sorry for missing these replies. $2000-$2500/month might be a bit on the high side, but I wanted to brace for the worst, and I would also like a nice place, not just the smallest closet I can find. A roommate would be nice, but I intend to make this move alone, and I hadn't really planned on trying to find a random roommate online somehow.

I'm used to small-averaged sized cities. I'm sure a place like Brooklyn would seem plenty big. However from my brief time spent in Manhattan, I saw the difference between me and the others I was with: they felt it was overwhelming, I felt like I couldn't get enough. Even if I don't for very long, I would love to at least start out living in Manhattan and experience the urban life I've been wanting.

I would appreciate any more comments and suggestions. I'd like to be doing this within about 18 months. My biggest questions right now are when to start job and apartment searching, which sections of Manhattan I should be looking at, and what sorts of companies I should consider applying to. Happy Thanksgiving!
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Old 11-25-2009, 05:44 PM
 
11,681 posts, read 21,263,030 times
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First- do not count on having enough time to work a second job. People in Manhattan in nearly every professional industry work a lot. A lot more than the exact same jobs in other parts of the country. Plan on logging 55-70 hours a week, unless you're in banking, then 80-110 hours.

Second- if you are planning to move to New York, I would assume you are excellent at your job and a student of your industry. You should know what companies need software developers, not asking on an internet forum. Only the best if the best are able to make enough money in NYC for it to be worth moving alone, away from your family and support network.

Third- if you have four years experience, try to find a well respected recruiter who has clients in NYC who are hiring people like you. LinkedIn is a good networking resource. I keep my resume updated on there and am contacted by recruiters in my industry about every other week, even through the recession. As a mid-career move, you should have enough experience and self-respect to find a company who will pay to fly you to NYC to interview and pay to relocate you (ie, break your current lease, pay full moving expenses, and possibly broker's fee/ deposit on your NYC apartment). Unless you are changing industries and starting over, someone with 4-7 years experience definitely deserves a relo package.

Lastly, $2,000 should get you housing anywhere in Manhattan or Brooklyn. In some parts of Brooklyn, it could be a 2 bedroom apartment, in Manhattan it could be a decent sized studio (350 sf) in an Upper East Side walk-up or a tiny shoebox studio (like 200sf) facing the back of a small building downtown- Lower East Side, East Village, Chelsea, Tribeca. Find out where your job is and then go from there. I recommend staying on the same side of town (east or west side) as your office. Ie, don't live on the Upper East Side and work in Tribeca- getting cross town is a PITA.

Also, since it doesn't seem like you have any friends in the city, people in Manhattan live in really small spaces and it's nothing to be embarrasse about. I know in Dallas where I live now, no one would be caught dead renting a studio apartment. But in NYC, everyone lives in a studio if you're a young professional making under $200k, living alone, and in Manhattan (south of Harlem). No one ever sees your apartment. It's not like you'll have friends over ever for dinner or to play guitar hero or whatever. I knew people for four years and never set foot in their apartments. Just get the smallest space you won't feel claustrrphobic in and go for it.

Lastly- timing? Start looking when you are mentally prepared to move to NYC in as few as 30-45 days. When I move to Dallas, I interviewed on the 3rd of one month, gave notice on the 7th, last day of work was the 28th, moving van came on the 31st and I started work on the 10th of the next month...about 38 days later. It was quick.
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Old 11-25-2009, 05:54 PM
 
7,079 posts, read 33,759,392 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TurtleCreek80 View Post


Lastly, $2,000 should get you housing anywhere in Manhattan or Brooklyn. In some parts of Brooklyn, it could be a 2 bedroom apartment, in Manhattan it could be a decent sized studio (350 sf) in an Upper East Side walk-up or a tiny shoebox studio (like 200sf) facing the back of a small building downtown- Lower East Side, East Village, Chelsea, Tribeca.
ANYWHERE in Manhattan? I don't think so.
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Old 11-25-2009, 07:32 PM
 
11,681 posts, read 21,263,030 times
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Yes, $2,000 will get "housing" in any neighborhood in Manhattan. Could be a studio, could be a bedroom in a share, could be a bedroom the size of a closet in a share, but yes, it's possible.

I have friends paying right at or a little under $2k who live on the UES, UWS, Gramercy, Union Square, Hell's Kitchen, Midtown East, Chelsea (4 bedroom/ 2 bath on the 5th floor of a walk up with a real eat-in kitchen....the most any 1 roomate pays is $1,400), East Village, West Village, SoHo (that friend has been in the same tiny studio for 10 years so maybe not fair).

Your posts continue to show you are out of touch with the lower end of the Manhattan rental market where most of the young professionals in their 20s live.

My first NYC apartment was in the lower 90s off 3rd in a post-war doorman building with a sweeping view of Central Park and the UWS from our 20th floor apartment. It was a 750sf 1/1. We had a real wall installed in the living room to create my bedroom, which was about 12x12. We still had a 12x14 living room leftover. We split the $1980 rent ($985 each). We found it in the NY Times and the buildig's management company paid the broker's fee.

Found my second apartment in the East 70s (off York, but on the M57 bus route which dropped me 1 block from my midtown office) in the Times, too. Rented directly from the mgmt co-no fee. Paid $1225, then $1300 the second year for a sunny 300sf studio on the 3rd floor of a pre-war walk up. I had two huge windows overlooking a park, and a newly remodeled bathroom. Great closet space, too!

My last apartment was owned by the same mgmt company, in fact I moved one door down into a 600sf true 1 bedroom with a huge recently remodeled kitchen (granite, stainless steel appliances, cute cabinets with leader glass doors). Again, two huge windows facing the park across the street. I paid $1600 for that apartment.

So it most certainly can be done.
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