U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Virginia > Northern Virginia
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-27-2011, 07:32 AM
 
10,606 posts, read 12,148,952 times
Reputation: 6500

Advertisements

I don't consider Northern VA to be "southern" at all.

I think when you get down to Richmond, it starts seeming more like the South, but not like the deep south.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-27-2011, 08:25 AM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
8,815 posts, read 10,719,701 times
Reputation: 2523
Quote:
Originally Posted by waydownsouth View Post
Hello, I live in NC along the SC border. I've heard a lot of Virginian's consider themselves southerners. Some people say the potomac is what divides the south from the midatlantic. What do y'all think.

Historically, that is correct. Penn was northern, Maryland was a "border state" and Virginia was southern. anyone looking at the political history of Virginia from 1865 to the late 1960s (when "massive resistance" finally failed), would need to understand Va's southern background to make sense of it.

However since the 1930s or so, parts of northern virginia have gradually been absorbed into the greater Washington metro area. I think its fair to say that the entire metro area is "mid Atlantic" both because of its historic relationship to Maryland, and because as national capital, DC has drawn both northern and southern influences (and non - Maryland border state influences - for example the local bluegrass music scene, which originated with Kentucky migrants during WW2) The edge between the areas within the DC metro area and "the rest of Virginia" keeps changing, and is somewhat fuzzy.

In addition, there are some folks who would say that NoVa feels a bit more southern than the Md parst of metro DC. As not everyone agrees on 'what feels southern' or on the extent of actual differences between NoVa and the DC suburbs in MD, thats one we often disagree about. Suffice it to say, any "southernness" in NoVa is pretty subtle. Much of what seems like southernness to yankee transplants here (I mean folk from new england or NY or the upper midwest) is really just their misreading of the MidAtlantic character of the region.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-27-2011, 09:56 AM
 
Location: Everywhere and Nowhere
14,131 posts, read 27,101,754 times
Reputation: 6826
DC changed from Southern about the same time NoVA did. Remember it was also segregated until the 60s.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-27-2011, 10:21 AM
 
Location: The Port City is rising.
8,815 posts, read 10,719,701 times
Reputation: 2523
Quote:
Originally Posted by CAVA1990 View Post
DC changed from Southern about the same time NoVA did. Remember it was also segregated until the 60s.
DC dropped school segregation before Brown V Bd IIUC. Even before Maryland did. The presence of official segregation is a very imperfect marker of southernness, as it was widespread in the border states (including Maryland). Anyway, by 1950 Arlington and Alexandria were pretty definitely culturally within the metro area, and Fairfax was partly there.

I think its pretty clear that DC was mixed yankee/southern (and hence "middle atlantic" in my usage) for generations before the civil rights movement (though the New Deal certainly impacted the relative balance). The change in DC with the inflow of northerners during the New Deal (counterbalanced, to some degree, by other inflows during WW2) is far from as dramatic as the transition each NoVa jurisdiction had as it entered the commutershed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-27-2011, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
223 posts, read 1,067,173 times
Reputation: 98
I think there are two "boundaries" to speak of here: the urban boundary and the rural boundary.

I think the urban boundary between Mid-Atlantic (or North) and South is located somewhere along the I-95 corridor between Richmond and D.C. Of course, it's not a line; rather, it's a nebulous region where "Southern" moves from minority to majority as one travels south.

With that said, I think the rural boundary between North and South remains the Mason-Dixon Line. There are areas of rural Maryland, rural northern Virginia, and even southern Delaware that are distinctly more Southern than Northern.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-27-2011, 01:04 PM
 
12,825 posts, read 20,154,879 times
Reputation: 10910
Quote:
Originally Posted by yankee.peddler View Post
I think there are two "boundaries" to speak of here: the urban boundary and the rural boundary.

I think the urban boundary between Mid-Atlantic (or North) and South is located somewhere along the I-95 corridor between Richmond and D.C. Of course, it's not a line; rather, it's a nebulous region where "Southern" moves from minority to majority as one travels south.

With that said, I think the rural boundary between North and South remains the Mason-Dixon Line. There are areas of rural Maryland, rural northern Virginia, and even southern Delaware that are distinctly more Southern than Northern.
I agree.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-27-2011, 02:09 PM
 
Location: Orange Hunt Estates, W. Springfield
628 posts, read 1,727,763 times
Reputation: 231
Quote:
Originally Posted by yankee.peddler View Post
I think there are two "boundaries" to speak of here: the urban boundary and the rural boundary.

I think the urban boundary between Mid-Atlantic (or North) and South is located somewhere along the I-95 corridor between Richmond and D.C. Of course, it's not a line; rather, it's a nebulous region where "Southern" moves from minority to majority as one travels south.

With that said, I think the rural boundary between North and South remains the Mason-Dixon Line. There are areas of rural Maryland, rural northern Virginia, and even southern Delaware that are distinctly more Southern than Northern.
This is one of the better definitions I've seen. For me the distinctions are cultural. The "North" dips down along the urbanized East Coast to somewhere around Fredericksburg. On the other hand, the Southern-like aspects of Appalachia (roughly the "rural" of the poster) include a geographic lobe that reaches at least as far north as the M-D line and, I believe, into PA, as well. And then there's Smith Is. in the Chesapeake, which is still English!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-27-2011, 02:16 PM
 
125 posts, read 443,922 times
Reputation: 34
Southern is defined as where I live at the moment.

(No, not proud of my Southern heritage in the least!)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-28-2011, 07:58 AM
 
298 posts, read 597,444 times
Reputation: 142
Quote:
Originally Posted by waydownsouth View Post
Hello, I live in NC along the SC border. I've heard a lot of Virginian's consider themselves southerners. Some people say the potomac is what divides the south from the midatlantic. What do y'all think.
DC is a mix, where North meets South. Kennedy famously remarked that it has the worst of each: "Washington is a city of Southern efficiency and Northern charm." - John F. Kennedy

Maybe I'm more traditionalist, but I think DC and even Baltimore have a distinct "Southern" feel. I'd say you start feeling like you are in "the North" once you up around Newark, Delaware.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-28-2011, 08:30 AM
 
19,183 posts, read 28,391,118 times
Reputation: 4002
So, what are the hallmarks of all this "southerness" that might determine the nature of a region? So far, it seems that rural is an influence, along with long ago attitudes toward segregation and which if any side an area was on during the even longer ago Civil War. Is that about it?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Virginia > Northern Virginia
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top