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Old 01-26-2016, 09:57 AM
 
Location: North Carolina
2,033 posts, read 1,749,694 times
Reputation: 1538

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US cities with fastest-growing startup scenes - Business Insider

4. Raleigh, NC: 110.28% deal growth in 2015, 26.29% average growth since 2012.


Flickr/chucka_nc

3. Seattle, WA: 110.40% deal growth in 2015, 26.37% average growth since 2012.


AP



2. Salt Lake City, UT: 113.27% deal growth in 2015, 27.52% average growth since 2012.


Flickr/skia69


1. St. Louis, MO: 342.70% deal growth in 2015, 33.02% average growth since 2012.


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Old 01-26-2016, 07:06 PM
 
256 posts, read 201,181 times
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Yes, I read this, and also, NY is in the top 5 outbound states - Nassau/Suffolk Long Island (where I live), is the 2nd most expensive place to raise a family in this country, according to another article. hmmmm I think we plan to "move" in the right direction!!
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Old 01-26-2016, 07:39 PM
 
321 posts, read 268,035 times
Reputation: 371
Lies, damned lies and statistics. That's a saying for a reason.

The list is nice, but I don't put a whole lot of stock in rankings like this when they're based on percentage increase. Going from 1 to 2 is a 100% increase; that doesn't mean it's the place to be for startups. Just look at St. Louis in the number 1 spot. Their startup scene was practically nonexistent but because of a few initiatives they've been implementing they're starting to convince a few folks to move there (particularly in the ag-tech space) and bam--you get a 342% increase. That's nice, but I'm not packing my bags any time soon to head there.

I'm not trying to poo-poo the fact that Raleigh made the list. I think that's great and I'd like to continue to see the startup scene here improve. I just think this article should be taken with a grain of salt (as should all articles which rank items based on metrics which are sufficiently indistinguishable from magic).
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Old 01-27-2016, 06:08 AM
 
258 posts, read 205,451 times
Reputation: 282
Quote:
Originally Posted by tkeru408 View Post
Lies, damned lies and statistics. That's a saying for a reason.

The list is nice, but I don't put a whole lot of stock in rankings like this when they're based on percentage increase. Going from 1 to 2 is a 100% increase; that doesn't mean it's the place to be for startups. Just look at St. Louis in the number 1 spot. Their startup scene was practically nonexistent but because of a few initiatives they've been implementing they're starting to convince a few folks to move there (particularly in the ag-tech space) and bam--you get a 342% increase. That's nice, but I'm not packing my bags any time soon to head there.

I'm not trying to poo-poo the fact that Raleigh made the list. I think that's great and I'd like to continue to see the startup scene here improve. I just think this article should be taken with a grain of salt (as should all articles which rank items based on metrics which are sufficiently indistinguishable from magic).
Complete rubbish using selected info and data points to manipulate the results and not give any real info. It's like saying Generic Suburb, USA is the best place to live in the country because the population went from 2000 to 8000.

And clicking on the original article inside the link that the OP provided, the disinformation and manipulation is even worse. They only selected 16 cities for this study with no explanation on why the certain cities were chosen. They used log scale to manipulate some graphs, used 1 year growth when conducive, and utilized other shady tactics.
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Old 01-27-2016, 06:15 AM
 
Location: Cary, NC
33,649 posts, read 58,387,489 times
Reputation: 32374
Y'all be takin this way to seriously.
It is clickbait to sell advertising for more money based on hit count.


Next!
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Old 01-27-2016, 07:03 AM
 
3,245 posts, read 5,281,230 times
Reputation: 5797
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeJaquish View Post
Y'all be takin this way to seriously.
It is clickbait to sell advertising for more money based on hit count.


Next!
Perhaps, but I'd be remiss if I didn't throw another log on this slow building fire. My son's friend from UNCG was heavily recruited by startup tech companies in RTP recently to the point where he dropped out of college because the money was too good to pass up. He said that he received more and better offers locally than from Silicon Valley.

Maybe a fluff piece to generate click-throughs, maybe not.
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Old 01-27-2016, 07:13 AM
 
Location: Cary, NC
33,649 posts, read 58,387,489 times
Reputation: 32374
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYC2RDU View Post
Perhaps, but I'd be remiss if I didn't throw another log on this slow building fire. My son's friend from UNCG was heavily recruited by startup tech companies in RTP recently to the point where he dropped out of college because the money was too good to pass up. He said that he received more and better offers locally than from Silicon Valley.

Maybe a fluff piece to generate click-throughs, maybe not.
Oh, a fluff piece for sure, but also for sure we do have a robust startup culture in the Triangle.
Good for the kid!
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Old 01-27-2016, 07:17 AM
 
Location: North of South, South of North
8,706 posts, read 8,823,909 times
Reputation: 5073
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYC2RDU View Post
Perhaps, but I'd be remiss if I didn't throw another log on this slow building fire. My son's friend from UNCG was heavily recruited by startup tech companies in RTP recently to the point where he dropped out of college because the money was too good to pass up. He said that he received more and better offers locally than from Silicon Valley.
There is more and more of this happening, to the point where the so-called experts are saying college is a waste of time in certain fields now. Many companies are looking for something different in their new recruits, than the standard piece of paper. It will be interesting how this plays out in a place like Raleigh, with not only the startups, but also with so many colleges/universities in the area. Will there be a shift? I hope so, as the price of college is pretty much absurd and prohibitive for those on the lower end of the economic scale.
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Old 01-27-2016, 08:11 AM
 
Location: North Carolina
2,033 posts, read 1,749,694 times
Reputation: 1538
Quote:
Originally Posted by tkeru408 View Post
Lies, damned lies and statistics. That's a saying for a reason.

The list is nice, but I don't put a whole lot of stock in rankings like this when they're based on percentage increase. Going from 1 to 2 is a 100% increase; that doesn't mean it's the place to be for startups. Just look at St. Louis in the number 1 spot. Their startup scene was practically nonexistent but because of a few initiatives they've been implementing they're starting to convince a few folks to move there (particularly in the ag-tech space) and bam--you get a 342% increase. That's nice, but I'm not packing my bags any time soon to head there.

I'm not trying to poo-poo the fact that Raleigh made the list. I think that's great and I'd like to continue to see the startup scene here improve. I just think this article should be taken with a grain of salt (as should all articles which rank items based on metrics which are sufficiently indistinguishable from magic).
Legitimate points for sure. I did and LOL when I saw St. Louis at #1 ... but as others have said Raleigh-Durham's startup scene is pretty strong.
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Old 01-27-2016, 08:57 AM
 
3,245 posts, read 5,281,230 times
Reputation: 5797
Quote:
Originally Posted by North_Pinellas_Guy View Post
There is more and more of this happening, to the point where the so-called experts are saying college is a waste of time in certain fields now. Many companies are looking for something different in their new recruits, than the standard piece of paper. It will be interesting how this plays out in a place like Raleigh, with not only the startups, but also with so many colleges/universities in the area. Will there be a shift? I hope so, as the price of college is pretty much absurd and prohibitive for those on the lower end of the economic scale.
While I hate being one of those posters who takes a thread off its rails, here I go anyway.

My son made an impassioned argument why his friend dropping out of college to join a tech startup was the right decision (I argued that he should have finished college or at least taken a leave of absence). He was saying that companies value skills over academics, that they want candidates with an entrepreneurial spirit and who are risk takers. I'm a bit cynical myself because I never completed my undergraduate degree and I've been operating under the assumption that it's limited my upward mobility (I'm a bit of a king-maker, not someone who's considered a king-candidate). But after being hired by prestigious companies a few times because of my skills and experience I started wondering what added value my completing an English degree would serve as an IT professional. Why would that piece of paper make me more attractive, particularly when you consider it was based on work I would have completed 30 years ago?

I won't lie, I only value the price of post high school education if it's relevant to the position and if it was obtained recently (within the past decade). But if I was building a development group (and I have, including somewhat recently), I'm looking for serious propeller heads who can code in their sleep. I don't want academics with only broad and somewhat generic technology skills, I want people who code for fun, or to solve a problem or to try and develop an application others can use. I don't need them to have pedigree, just mad coding skills and enthusiasm for the work.

That said, I've also advised my son to complete his degree before he's entrenched in a career because it will never be as easy or simple to do so as it is right now. He's itching to get out there but that's what summer internships are for. And if he decides to jump start his technology career he's promised not to drop out of college because for the field he's most interested in (AI), a PhD would be invaluable.
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