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Old 05-31-2008, 09:37 AM
 
3,033 posts, read 5,951,953 times
Reputation: 779
Enjoy the AC! Here in MA, it can get just as hot and humid (yup, I check the dewpoints and temps in the summer and on our worst days, we are as bad as you guys!) 'cept it's not that common to have central AC. Even a lot of public buildings, such as libraries and schools are not air conditioned. Sometimes the best place to be is the ice rink!

I used to complain about the humidity when we lived in NoVA (and I grew up in Philly--you think I'd be used to it?) but we had the central AC and access to our community pool. Here we have no central AC and the window units cool the bedrooms but don't make a dent in the rest of the house. There is no community pool.

The only positive thing I can say is that our hot/humid days are not as great in number as yours!
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Old 05-31-2008, 11:44 AM
 
Location: SW Durham, NC
1,011 posts, read 1,866,296 times
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NChomeoneday, when I first moved here I had a small 1 bedroom rental that only had a window AC in the bedroom. Keeping all the window shades down during the day and using a box fan to circulate the cool kept it comfortable to the rest of the house.

Definitely moving slower helps too in the heat and humidity. I used to just think it was a stereotypical southern thing, but when I found my self moving slower too I understood why!! Otherwise one will pass out! ;o)
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Old 05-31-2008, 11:45 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, North Carolina
115 posts, read 273,872 times
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Take the kayak out to beaverdam or jordan lake and "accidentally" fall in.
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Old 05-31-2008, 11:48 AM
Status: "Where has summer gone??" (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: Taylors, SC
8,613 posts, read 14,033,995 times
Reputation: 2643
Go to the state parks, community pools, shopping, or drive to the beach. It only lasts a couple of months and then you have a beautiful fall to look forward to.
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Old 05-31-2008, 12:28 PM
 
3,033 posts, read 5,951,953 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hula View Post
NChomeoneday, when I first moved here I had a small 1 bedroom rental that only had a window AC in the bedroom. Keeping all the window shades down during the day and using a box fan to circulate the cool kept it comfortable to the rest of the house.

Definitely moving slower helps too in the heat and humidity. I used to just think it was a stereotypical southern thing, but when I found my self moving slower too I understood why!! Otherwise one will pass out! ;o)
The fans are definitely a great idea, no matter where you are, as they help lower the AC bills! We do have some ceiling fans here and last summer I invested in a few of those stand up oscillating fans.
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Old 05-31-2008, 02:57 PM
 
Location: Durham, NC
1,232 posts, read 2,575,635 times
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We experienced our first full summer last year after arriving from the West. Though the west is becoming a little more humid year after year these last few years, I found the humidity manageable here in NC (more so than, say, Florida). What we did:

Seconding Jaquish's opinion, don't fight it. Humidity will arrive here and be a way of life for a bit (just like the cold). Perspiration is expected, so work your schedule accordingly. If you're gonna go out on the town or for an interview, dress up indoors in air conditioning and move to your vehicle where there's, presumably, a/c there. Don't expect to take out the trash in your good duds on your way out to the car... just that alone can conjure up a good sweat.

Drink lots of fluids. Not just water because too much of it can be harmful if that's all you drink. Balance it out with juices and beverages with electrolytes. It makes a big difference when you're hydrated both for comfort and for your own safety (I made the mistake of working out in the yard for a few hours pulling weeds in the heat without hydrating. Though I did not pass out, I did start to feel sort of out of it. Stay hydrated).

And drinks lots of fluids even when you're not thirsty. Waiting for thirst is just a sign that your body is begging for it, at that point. If you're in the pool, in an A/C environment, in the car, etc... not just in the humidity, it's important to maintain a fluid intake schedule. I'm constantly being reminded to drink fluids and I'm grateful to those who remind me.

Of course, I can't say enough good things about air conditioning. However, with A/C comes financial costs. Even with a central A/C system, if you spend most of your time in one room, or even two rooms, in the house, you could add a window A/C to those rooms to cut costs. Our bill reflected a big difference as a result. We also have ceiling fans that help circulate the air.

Also, staying in an A/C room constantly can arguably cause some people sinus issues. I think if you go in and out constantly from an A/C environment to a hot, humid environment, depending on your health and your ability to adapt, it could cause some bodily stress. It's different for each individual, but this minor note is a consideration.

Lastly, humidity is what it is. The more I complained about it, the worse it seemed. Not to say I like it in the least bit, I just try to acknowledge it for what it is knowing others are dealing with it too. Misery loves company, in a way. But realizing that it's just a part of living here, and not as bad as other places, I can manage it.
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Old 05-31-2008, 03:14 PM
 
473 posts, read 988,986 times
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Lots of bottled water. Cut down on salty snacks. Fresh fruits & veggies. Loose, cottony clothes (light colored). And yes - take it slow. Don't over exert, because you don't know you are until it's too late, and you'll pay for it.

Also, I've found this since moving South - SLOWLY adjust to going into buildings. They tend to really turn up the AC around here, so you're going from hot & humid at 95 degrees to almost frigid temps when going indoors. And vice versa. Ease into it!
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Old 05-31-2008, 03:21 PM
 
376 posts, read 599,139 times
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When I first came to the area, to interview for the job I now have, it was late august and a little rainy. After I picked up my rental car at the airport, I toured around for a few hours. In the mean time, it had gotten hotter outside and was drizzling intermittently. During a break in the drizzle, I parked somewhere around Moore Square to check out downtown on foot, and when I got out of the car I thought I had wet myself! I was frantically feeling my pants all over with my hands, and then I finally realized that it was just the humidity! I guess after six years in CA I forgot what humidity was like.

It is still annoying how much a cold drink sweats around here. Other than that, the humidity doesn't bother me as much as the heat does. Though I'll take it any day over the miserable midwestern weather I grew up with.
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Old 05-31-2008, 03:40 PM
 
103 posts, read 4,443 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dragonfly0428 View Post
Also, I've found this since moving South - SLOWLY adjust to going into buildings. They tend to really turn up the AC around here, so you're going from hot & humid at 95 degrees to almost frigid temps when going indoors. And vice versa. Ease into it!

I am glad you mentioned this. I have really noticed that they really crank the AC here and I cannot figure out why? Southerners should be used to the heat and not like the cold, yet the establishments crank the AC so cold that this northerner is cold.

Come on people.........back off on the AC to a normal comfortable temp.

I keep my house at 75 degrees in the summer and it is very very affordable at that temp.
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Old 05-31-2008, 05:04 PM
 
Location: NC native in Houston
190 posts, read 389,798 times
Reputation: 147
Don't sit outside in the shade, then fall asleep for a few hours while no longer in said shade. "Toasty" has a WHOLE new meaning once you wake up if you do this.
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