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Old 08-11-2011, 06:08 PM
 
Location: SW MO
23,605 posts, read 31,487,261 times
Reputation: 29071

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron. View Post
LOL.......I didn't know you were old enough to have retired.


I thought you were a "younger buck".




Ron
Not hardly! Retired, retired at 62. Older now but not wiser.
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Old 08-12-2011, 04:51 AM
 
Location: Prospect, KY
5,288 posts, read 17,960,936 times
Reputation: 6544
I can understand the appeal of having a farm but not at our age (60 and 65). We would never do anything like that at this stage in our lives. We do lots of volunteer work - work that we know really helps people, we have a nice sized yard with flower gardens (a yard that we can manage and still do other things), we travel, bike, hike and kayak and have parties, etc.

To us the best part of retirement is diversification with some spontaneity thrown in. It is so much fun to wake up and just decide to drive to New York or Chicago for a few days. Last week we woke up early one morning, found some great priced airline tickets on Southwest and flew across the U.S. 6 hours later to visit friends and family. A farm would never allow us that kind of freedom.

The other thing about having a farm: At 65+, the possibility that you will injure yourself is much higher than when you were 35. What happens to all those responsibilities if you aren't able to perform all the chores, take care of the animals, etc.? Things could get out of hand on a farm pretty quickly if you aren't able to do all that work. Selling farms is slow go in this economy. We really try to make wise choices as we get older, not choices that could end up causing us problems during our old age.
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Old 08-12-2011, 07:25 AM
 
Location: Wicker Park, Chicago
4,791 posts, read 13,207,172 times
Reputation: 1944
Acres of land? That's a BIG gardening headache! Especially when you're overrun with weeds and undesirable plants! I'd prefer to live in a house that has a tiny vegetable garden!
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Old 08-12-2011, 10:32 AM
 
Location: Lexington, SC
4,281 posts, read 10,739,306 times
Reputation: 3716
I initially retired at 62. I played golf 3 times a week but after a year or so, I got a little bored and stated drinking early....LOL

Then I went to work part time in an office super store, computer section for 3 days a week from 10am to 6pm. Later I cut it back to 10am to 4pm, two days a week. That and golf 2-3 times a week worked well for me. Kept me busy, put a few extra dollars in my pocket, and I drank less.....on some days.

Recently we moved and I am back to playing golf 3 times a week and drinking to much. I have decided to maybe start looking for another part time thingy to occupy myself. I am in no rush but expect I will do something. About my only requirments are clean and not on my feet all day plus not interfere with my golf schedule. The golf schedule is (Tue, Fri, Sun) and is my most important schedule.....work comes in far down the list of importance.....LOL
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Old 08-12-2011, 10:46 AM
 
Location: Connecticut is my adopted home.
2,277 posts, read 3,079,972 times
Reputation: 7018
Yes. I am too fidgety and ambitious to stay still so I need plenty to do physically to wear me out. I also need intellectual and social stimulation so while retired, I am actively seeking the right part time seasonal job to keep my hand in the game so to speak. My husband? He could happily putter away without making some sort of "progress" while I can't. Different strokes for different folks.
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Old 08-12-2011, 10:47 AM
 
Location: Edina, MN, USA
6,954 posts, read 7,393,688 times
Reputation: 16283
Quote:
Originally Posted by SCGranny View Post
Did it.
It's not as hard as you think; in fact, it is quite pleasant. Sweaty, productive, interesting - there's always something to do, from chopping firewood to feeding cattle to fixing fences. There's always something to learn, something new to experience.

People who look forward to retiring so that they don't have to work any more, who want to sit and watch TV and wait for death to roll over them in their sleep - usually end up friendless and alone, inactive and sodden, with multiple doctors and meds, looking for someone else to complain to about how miserable they are. Unless you remain active - either thru travel, exploring new challenges, or changing your lifestyle into something creative and productive - you might as well die the day they hand you the gold watch. I've worked on a lot of older people in EMS, and the ones who live the longest - and are the happiest - are the ones who stay mentally and physically active. The ones with the most severe and tragic medical complaints, the ones who commit suicide or become someone their own family and friends avoid, are the ones who thought that retirement meant doing nothing at all.

Whatever you choose to do after retirement - whether it's buy a boat and cruise the world, go back to school for something you always wanted to do, swim from Cuba to Florida, become a foster parent, or 'buy the farm' - do it with all your might. You may be slower, you may have more aches and pains than you did when you were 25 - but you'll have a lot more fun and be a lot happier.

LIVE until you die - then, and only then, should you stop. Ain' nuthin' guaranteed in this life, including how long you live. So live every moment!
I absolutely agree with this. I read some of these retirement threads and can't help but believe some people talk themselves into growing old. It's all about what they can't do vs what they can. This is the very reason I don't think I'd do well in a 55+ community. Great attitude!
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Old 08-12-2011, 12:13 PM
 
Location: Verde Valley AZ
8,618 posts, read 9,684,845 times
Reputation: 10965
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimrob1 View Post
I think many retirees that say they work part time for something to do actually need some extra cash. I don't think its every retiree, but I think its more than we would like to admit.

As far as the security guard situation. Sure why not. Though he seems to have his hands full with all that property. I don't think I could take care of all that property and work a job also. I'm retired from one job and work a part time job now. I just filed for SS today as I'm hitting that age in a few months and I will continue working part time. For me I will be supplementing income rather than for something to do. I'm glad for any retiree that can work part time for nothing more than something to do. They have done well.
Im my case, you are absolutely correct! I can stay as busy as I want at home, or doing whatever else I want, but I HAVE to work because I need the "extra cash". I am lucky that I really really love my job, my co-workers and the company I work for and I only have to work 33 hours a week. I have plenty of "down time" to still do what I want.

I already did my stint on 20 acres, years ago, and don't want to do it again. Lived off the grid, gardened big time, canned 400 jars of food every summer and enjoyed all that...for five years. Now I'm old, tired and lazy. I LIKE my "conveniences" and if I have to work to pay for them, so be it!
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Old 08-12-2011, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Bar Harbor, ME
1,922 posts, read 3,779,855 times
Reputation: 1292
I'm retired. I'm planning on being retired. If I wanted to work, then I would have stayed working for another 8 years until I reached the mandatory retirement age. People are always asking me what I'm going to do with my time and when I'm going to take up some part time job.

If I wanted a job, I wouldn't have retired.
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Old 08-12-2011, 02:47 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,684 posts, read 49,455,573 times
Reputation: 19134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zarathu View Post
I'm retired. I'm planning on being retired. If I wanted to work, then I would have stayed working for another 8 years until I reached the mandatory retirement age. People are always asking me what I'm going to do with my time and when I'm going to take up some part time job.

If I wanted a job, I wouldn't have retired.
Be thankful.

The first time at which my pension became available to me, it was also my 'Mandatory retirement age'.

Very little choice.

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Old 08-12-2011, 03:13 PM
 
Location: Near a river
16,042 posts, read 18,978,143 times
Reputation: 15649
Quote:
Originally Posted by SCGranny View Post
Did it.
It's not as hard as you think; in fact, it is quite pleasant. Sweaty, productive, interesting - there's always something to do, from chopping firewood to feeding cattle to fixing fences. There's always something to learn, something new to experience.

People who look forward to retiring so that they don't have to work any more, who want to sit and watch TV and wait for death to roll over them in their sleep - usually end up friendless and alone, inactive and sodden, with multiple doctors and meds, looking for someone else to complain to about how miserable they are. Unless you remain active - either thru travel, exploring new challenges, or changing your lifestyle into something creative and productive - you might as well die the day they hand you the gold watch. I've worked on a lot of older people in EMS, and the ones who live the longest - and are the happiest - are the ones who stay mentally and physically active. The ones with the most severe and tragic medical complaints, the ones who commit suicide or become someone their own family and friends avoid, are the ones who thought that retirement meant doing nothing at all.

Whatever you choose to do after retirement - whether it's buy a boat and cruise the world, go back to school for something you always wanted to do, swim from Cuba to Florida, become a foster parent, or 'buy the farm' - do it with all your might. You may be slower, you may have more aches and pains than you did when you were 25 - but you'll have a lot more fun and be a lot happier.

LIVE until you die - then, and only then, should you stop. Ain' nuthin' guaranteed in this life, including how long you live. So live every moment!
I know you are Southern but this also echoes a Yankee attitude--do until you drop, and never be afraid of hard work. Most of us lead pampered lives retiring from office type jobs and have no idea how to do what you do. People where I am are farming and intensively growing food on small land operations into their 80s. It's not unusual for a farmer to also be a concert violinist, poet, or sculptor in old age instead of just lawn croquet. I've seen older farmers hobbling on canes, and I know of one in a wheelchair, doing as much as their bodies will allow. If you ever write a book let us know.
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