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Old 11-04-2011, 09:05 AM
 
174 posts, read 257,810 times
Reputation: 389

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Originally Posted by jazzcat22 View Post
Go for it! I early retired five years ago. Completely self-financed retirement. No pensions. Pay $1500 a month for DH and my health insurance---at 57, still have 8 years to go until Medicare. We live simply, on the interest from our savings. Even though we have 25% less in investments than we did five years ago thanks to the market crash and pulling our money out to preserve what was left of it (admittedly not the most sophisticated thing to do, but it enabled us to sleep at night), have never regretted it! Joined a gym, became more social, and just loving life away from a soul-deadening job.

The other day I realized what a difference retirement has made in my overall attitude and behavior. A four year old boy came over and sat in one of the plushy chairs between me and DH. He was so friendly and engaging that we put down our newspapers and fully interacted with him for a few minutes. He had a lot to say about Halloween, his age, and a future puppet show he would be attending. When he left, I realized that I had fully been in the moment and wasn't worrying about "wasting" time talking to him. It seemed like a quality use of those minutes. I am not sure I would have been open to this had I not been early retired---my j*b did zap some energy, patience, etc.
You sound much like me. About eight years ago, I shifted my entire 457 Plan from the stock market to a guaranteed 3.55% interest account just so I didn't have to think about it anymore. My "sophisticated" friends laughed at the time, but at the moment I'm the one feeling like a genius (and sleeping at night). The feeling of always feeling "rushed" is one of the principal lures of retirement to me. I'm extremely tired of trying to "fit in" exercise at 5 in the morning, household projects between 2 and 4 on Sunday afternoon, etc. - and always feeling like "I've gotta get this done now and as quickly as possible."
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Old 11-04-2011, 09:53 AM
 
48 posts, read 38,717 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Venerable Bede View Post
You sound much like me. About eight years ago, I shifted my entire 457 Plan from the stock market to a guaranteed 3.55% interest account just so I didn't have to think about it anymore. My "sophisticated" friends laughed at the time, but at the moment I'm the one feeling like a genius (and sleeping at night). The feeling of always feeling "rushed" is one of the principal lures of retirement to me. I'm extremely tired of trying to "fit in" exercise at 5 in the morning, household projects between 2 and 4 on Sunday afternoon, etc. - and always feeling like "I've gotta get this done now and as quickly as possible."
That's how I feel. Always rushing around, getting up at 5 or even 4 to get in exercise and hobbies and chores, etc. Always watching the time, counting minutes, seeing life go by so fast. I still have so much I want to do in life, but my job takes up so much time. Fortunately I don't hate my job, but I do hate having a boss and always being stressed and worried. I might retire at 62, in less than 3 years, if possible, even though I won't have a big income.

If I were much younger and the economy were good, I would probably try to change jobs. but I think that would be impossible now. I have to hang on and stay here, but love the thought of maybe being able to survive without working 9 to 5.
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Old 11-04-2011, 10:33 AM
 
174 posts, read 257,810 times
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Originally Posted by songbird52 View Post
That's how I feel. Always rushing around, getting up at 5 or even 4 to get in exercise and hobbies and chores, etc. Always watching the time, counting minutes, seeing life go by so fast. I still have so much I want to do in life, but my job takes up so much time. Fortunately I don't hate my job, but I do hate having a boss and always being stressed and worried. I might retire at 62, in less than 3 years, if possible, even though I won't have a big income.

If I were much younger and the economy were good, I would probably try to change jobs. but I think that would be impossible now. I have to hang on and stay here, but love the thought of maybe being able to survive without working 9 to 5.
The other thing that always blows my mind is when I have a day off (as I did yesterday), get up at a reasonable hour and spend a leisurely day just "doing things" (exercise, projects, reading) at my pace, realize how many different things I've done and accomplished, and then look up at the clock and see that it's still only 3:45. I always say to my wife: "Good Lord, I wouldn't even be home from work for more than two hours! That shows you how incredibly long those days of sitting in my office doing nothing really are."

If I had it all to do over again, I'd work in a field that actually interested me, as opposed to one that I just sort of stumbled into to pay the bills. It must be great to be an archaeologist, musician, etc., where you actually enjoy what you're doing and hope you remain healthy enough to keep doing it until you're 90. I've actually seen attorneys and others in office-type jobs with this attitude, but it completely escapes me. I worked for one elderly attorney who was worth millions and had a beautiful beach-front home in Mexico, but even after he was going blind he'd sit at his desk reading statutes with a magnifying glass because he loved it so much. Completely unfathomable to me.
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Old 11-04-2011, 10:50 AM
 
48 posts, read 38,717 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Venerable Bede View Post
The other thing that always blows my mind is when I have a day off (as I did yesterday), get up at a reasonable hour and spend a leisurely day just "doing things" (exercise, projects, reading) at my pace, realize how many different things I've done and accomplished, and then look up at the clock and see that it's still only 3:45. I always say to my wife: "Good Lord, I wouldn't even be home from work for more than two hours! That shows you how incredibly long those days of sitting in my office doing nothing really are."

If I had it all to do over again, I'd work in a field that actually interested me, as opposed to one that I just sort of stumbled into to pay the bills. It must be great to be an archaeologist, musician, etc., where you actually enjoy what you're doing and hope you remain healthy enough to keep doing it until you're 90. I've actually seen attorneys and others in office-type jobs with this attitude, but it completely escapes me. I worked for one elderly attorney who was worth millions and had a beautiful beach-front home in Mexico, but even after he was going blind he'd sit at his desk reading statutes with a magnifying glass because he loved it so much. Completely unfathomable to me.
Well it's very hard to make a living at the most enjoyable things, like art or music, philosophy, history, sports, etc. You have to be very lucky to make a good income in a career that millions of other people are competing for. I think it's ok to find a compromise and do something you kind of like, and do the others as hobbies.

Is there possibly some area of law that you would sort of like working in? Or something law-related? Maybe something that pays less but you enjoy more.

There have been times when I have nothing to do at work and I know how that feels. It's nice once in a while, but not all the time. However, you could do a lot of interesting online reading, if you just stop worrying about not being busy.
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Old 11-04-2011, 11:35 AM
 
174 posts, read 257,810 times
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Originally Posted by songbird52 View Post
Well it's very hard to make a living at the most enjoyable things, like art or music, philosophy, history, sports, etc. You have to be very lucky to make a good income in a career that millions of other people are competing for. I think it's ok to find a compromise and do something you kind of like, and do the others as hobbies.

Is there possibly some area of law that you would sort of like working in? Or something law-related? Maybe something that pays less but you enjoy more.

There have been times when I have nothing to do at work and I know how that feels. It's nice once in a while, but not all the time. However, you could do a lot of interesting online reading, if you just stop worrying about not being busy.
Actually, though, I do know people who don't excel at the fields they are really interested in but who have been willing to make HUGE financial sacrifices just to be able to work in those fields. In my pre-law days, I was that way about golf and did work in the golf industry for a few years. Avid runners, which I've also been, are notoriously this way - piddly jobs are just fine so long as they give you the time to train and enough money for gas to get to all the 10K's and marathons. As stated in one of my earlier posts, I do have an application pending to teach, at least part-time, at a law school. I think that might actually be fun. On the other hand, the lure of Doing Nothing Except What I Want to Do is pretty strong for me. I really believe it's very difficult to be part of the working world and the consumer mindset at all and not have it dominate your life. I always remember the part of Walden where Thoreau says he thought long and hard about what he might do to earn a living in a way that wouldn't be completely disagreeable to him:
When formerly I was looking about to see what I could do for a living, some sad experience in conforming to the wishes of friends being fresh in my mind to tax my ingenuity, I thought often and seriously of picking huckleberries; that surely I could do, and its small profits might suffice,—for my greatest skill has been to want but little,—so little capital it required, so little distraction from my wonted moods, I foolishly thought. While my acquaintances went unhesitatingly into trade or the professions, I contemplated this occupation as most like theirs; ranging the hills all summer to pick the berries which came in my way, and thereafter carelessly dispose of them.... But I have since learned that trade curses everything it handles; and though you trade in messages from heaven, the whole curse of trade attaches to the business.
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Old 02-29-2012, 04:50 PM
 
1,595 posts, read 2,373,909 times
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Bring a book to work or check out FB on your Ipod not the work computer. Bide your time until you get your 20/25 years in and have your age 55 or over. You may need the time (years) accrued to get your benefits. Although Obama may be changing that when his plan takes over.
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Old 03-01-2012, 01:52 AM
 
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Just ride it out until your ready to retire.. You'll know when your ready. In the mean time max out vacation time as a test run.
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Old 03-01-2012, 02:18 AM
 
Location: Table Rock Lake - MO/AR Ozarks
227 posts, read 285,388 times
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The person I rent from retired at 55 from a state government job because he was tired of the politics. It was a toss up for him too financially. If he'd stayed until 70, he'd get twice the pension, but he didn't know if he'd even live that long or much longer after that to make it worth it. He now works as a craftsman at Silver Dollar City and loves it. He doesn't make much money, but with his retirement, he's doing fine and he's happier than ever.

I've got to admit, while reading your post, my face looked like the Smiley with the wide open circle mouth. I had no idea that government people were getting paid that much for doing nothing. Absolutely no offense intended toward you at all. I can absolutely tell you are a decent person. I'm just naive.
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Old 03-01-2012, 03:35 AM
 
4,649 posts, read 6,482,581 times
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Originally Posted by Ozarks Crescent Mural View Post
The person I rent from retired at 55 from a state government job because he was tired of the politics. It was a toss up for him too financially. If he'd stayed until 70, he'd get twice the pension, but he didn't know if he'd even live that long or much longer after that to make it worth it. He now works as a craftsman at Silver Dollar City and loves it. He doesn't make much money, but with his retirement, he's doing fine and he's happier than ever.

I've got to admit, while reading your post, my face looked like the Smiley with the wide open circle mouth. I had no idea that government people were getting paid that much for doing nothing. Absolutely no offense intended toward you at all. I can absolutely tell you are a decent person. I'm just naive.

Top Ten Most Outrageous Government Pensions - YouTube
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Old 03-01-2012, 03:46 AM
 
Location: Connecticut
1,144 posts, read 1,824,544 times
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I give you credit for sticking it out but I would have shot myself years ago - If it was me I would retire especially if you numerous hobbies and interests to keep you busy - A really nice thing you can do is donate your time to the senior center in you area - The try to have people with talents to help out people that are on a low fixed income - I think even with all your hobbies you will find that very rewarding -
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