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Old 02-07-2013, 08:27 AM
 
Location: East Coast of the United States
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Something tells me the answer is Dallas.
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Old 02-07-2013, 08:56 AM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
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Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
Something tells me the answer is Dallas.
Well not Dallas itself but the zillions of smaller cities surrounding it. Arlington and Forth Worth included.
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Old 02-07-2013, 10:55 AM
 
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I would think that would add to the quality of life. If in City A you were forced to live in a townhouse or apartment due to a shortage of single family homes that are affordable, and in City B you could pick a number of affordable single family homes, IF I liked single family homes with a yard and trees, that would encourage me to live in CITY B.

Last edited by Old Tired Man; 02-07-2013 at 11:08 AM..
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Old 02-07-2013, 02:56 PM
 
29,900 posts, read 27,345,109 times
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Originally Posted by Nairobi View Post
Of course it is, but I don't think it's more than DFW and Atlanta.
I could understand DFW, but not Atlanta since Houston's metro is larger by over half a million. I must be missing something.
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Old 02-07-2013, 03:37 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,635 posts, read 27,047,623 times
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You know what. I don't think you can discount Chicagoland here. Unless I am misreading the actual criteria. I don't know if it beats Houston, DFW, Atlanta, or Miami here. But nearly all of Chicagoland outside of Chicago is single family with yards and remember, there are 9.6 million people in Chicagoland. Even Oak Park. Heck even parts of the city which is bungalow nation.

I don't know percentage wise though but in raw numbers, Chicagoland probably wins this.
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Old 02-07-2013, 03:43 PM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
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Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
I could understand DFW, but not Atlanta since Houston's metro is larger by over half a million. I must be missing something.
The three metros are very similar but very different.

I would say Atl has the edge in condo numbers
Houston has the edge in apartments and townhomes
And Dfw has the edge in affordable but huge single family homes with swimming pool, sauna and room for a pony.

I am always awed by Houstons building pattern. They would build a new road far from civilization and you would think large lot homes would be the only thing going up there but apartments shoot up between like weeds.
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Old 02-07-2013, 03:50 PM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HtownLove View Post
The three metros are very similar but very different.

I would say Atl has the edge in condo numbers
Houston has the edge in apartments and townhomes
And Dfw has the edge in affordable but huge single family homes with swimming pool, sauna and room for a pony.
I am always awed by Houstons building pattern. They would build a new road far from civilization and you would think large lot homes would be the only thing going up there but apartments shoot up between like weeds.
Atlanta suburbs have bigger lots though, right? I would agree that Houston's lots are probably the smallest throughout the metro area consistently.
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Old 02-07-2013, 04:12 PM
 
Location: Up on the moon laughing down on you
18,509 posts, read 28,160,729 times
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Originally Posted by Spade View Post
Atlanta suburbs have bigger lots though, right? I would agree that Houston's lots are probably the smallest throughout the metro area consistently.
I am not just talking about the lots. Atl has the best lots. The houses fit in so well.

I was going more for the size of the houses and amenities. You get lots of house near lots of stuff in Dfw burbs.

Houstons burbs have been historically lacking in that you had to venture towards the central city to find things. In other words Houstons burbs were more burbs than independent self sustaining cities. But that is all changing.

Atls were more like houston in practice, although in theory they were independent cities like the set up in DFW. Again tho the set up is changing too.

As for houstons lots, yeah we do get jipped. Have you seen how narrow the lots are on streets such as Richmond, braeswood, etc in the loop? Its how they drive up density in these areas
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Old 03-04-2015, 10:38 PM
 
Location: Palm Springs, CA
26,529 posts, read 25,014,689 times
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Here's your answer, folks:

More Americans Move to Detached Houses | Newgeography.com

Oklahoma City comes out on top. If you're talking about very large metro areas, it looks like Detroit is the winner.
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Old 03-05-2015, 11:46 AM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
2,975 posts, read 4,078,755 times
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Despite Miami's condo boom, there are a lot of houses with yards even within a few blocks of the skyscrapers. Yes, even on the Beach side there are still houses--a large fraction of Miami Beach is like this. And Miami ranks as the 4th highest metro area population on Wikipedia.

It seems counter-intuitive, but actually the further out in the suburbs you go, the more you find zero-lot line houses, townhouses, and condos, compared with the older (1950's-60's) "inner ring" closer to the city. You can walk 10 minutes out of Brickell and be in a residential neighbourhood with homes, then again, you can drive an hour and see condo complexes as you get off the highway exit. We don't really have a gradual decrease in density from skyscrapers to midrise buildings to lowrise/townhouses to houses here. Too bad so many of these neighbourhoods are undesirable, but there is some gentrification going on--especially as locals are priced out of condos due to higher down payments/deposits required.
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