U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 03-06-2011, 09:16 PM
 
Location: Toronto
3,339 posts, read 2,929,893 times
Reputation: 2253

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoney63 View Post
I suppose there are definitions to be adhered to, but a place with its 5 coolest months as cool as here, just doesn't seem subtropical to me.
17/6, 13/3, 12/2, 13/3, 16/4 (C) for a winter doesn't seem unreasonable for a subtropical climate as opposed to a tropical one, but rather typical. Say, for the American Deep South.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 03-07-2011, 12:36 AM
 
Location: motueka nz
504 posts, read 480,607 times
Reputation: 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stumbler. View Post
17/6, 13/3, 12/2, 13/3, 16/4 (C) for a winter doesn't seem unreasonable for a subtropical climate as opposed to a tropical one, but rather typical. Say, for the American Deep South.
Those temps seem very low for subtropical winters. I would have thought NZs warmest winter of 8-16C would be of the bottom end of a subtropical winter scale Somewhere like Brisbane (9-20C) would be a typical subtropical winter to me. Those temps for Rome would make our winters here sub tropical.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-07-2011, 08:04 AM
 
Location: Two Rivers, Wisconsin
7,788 posts, read 6,357,459 times
Reputation: 10435
When I was in Rome, then driving around Italy for 2 weeks in late October, I was amazed at how warm it was! The day we went to Florence, it was warm/humid surprised me for late October. We were staying at a B & B in the hills of Umbria so mornings were cool but warmed up every day.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-07-2011, 08:24 AM
 
Location: New York City
2,789 posts, read 2,855,195 times
Reputation: 1648
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoney63 View Post
Those temps seem very low for subtropical winters. I would have thought NZs warmest winter of 8-16C would be of the bottom end of a subtropical winter scale Somewhere like Brisbane (9-20C) would be a typical subtropical winter to me. Those temps for Rome would make our winters here sub tropical.
Brisbane is actually close to being tropical. If it were just a couple of degrees Celsius warmer in winter, it would be fully tropical. Gladstone is tropical.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-07-2011, 08:53 AM
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
27,965 posts, read 14,205,995 times
Reputation: 8847
An average of 7C or more in the coldest month sounds subtropical; assuming that means daily highs or 13C or more.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-07-2011, 10:56 AM
 
Location: motueka nz
504 posts, read 480,607 times
Reputation: 226
Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
An average of 7C or more in the coldest month sounds subtropical; assuming that means daily highs or 13C or more.
Cool. I live in the subtropics now.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-07-2011, 11:03 AM
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
27,965 posts, read 14,205,995 times
Reputation: 8847
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoney63 View Post
Cool. I live in the subtropics now.
Well, if the summers are hot.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-07-2011, 11:18 AM
 
Location: New York City
2,789 posts, read 2,855,195 times
Reputation: 1648
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stoney63 View Post
Cool. I live in the subtropics now.
Nope. Summers too cool. Average monthly temps have to be at least 22C. That's probably close to your average monthly high.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-07-2011, 11:47 AM
 
Location: motueka nz
504 posts, read 480,607 times
Reputation: 226
The whole classification doesn't make sense to me. I've seen NYC listed as subtropical before, which is even more absurd than here trying to call itself subtropical. A system based on seasons or yearly halves seems better sense to me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-07-2011, 12:07 PM
 
Location: Western Massachusetts
27,965 posts, read 14,205,995 times
Reputation: 8847
Yea, Cfa should be divided into warm temperate and subtropical, with maybe a 5C (or maybe slightly higher) average for the coldest month being the dividing line between the two. Ideally, I'd like the line to be close to where evergreen plants become common and the vegetation becomes distinctly southern.

With this method Atlanta would subtropical and so would all the gulf states and the coastal Carolinas. The mid-Atlantic and upper south (Virginia, inland North Carolina and Tennessee) would be warm temperate. This would mean all of Australia that is Cfa would be subtropical rather than warm temperate, which seems reasonable to me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Weather

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top