U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics > Business
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 06-04-2019, 09:01 PM
 
Location: Shreveport, LA
1,430 posts, read 1,122,683 times
Reputation: 770

Advertisements

I moonlight at walmart on the weekends and on afternoons and one thing I always want when I’m there is a slice of pizza. There is a pizza place across the street, but I have to actually go out to my car and cross 4 lanes of busy traffic to get there. I make 45k a year from my teaching job and 16/hour from my pharmacy assistant job, and work on average about 30 hours a week in the pharmacy. It wouldn’t take me long to save and purchase a Sbarro franchise for my store. My question is how I can calculate if I can cover my overhead as well as how long it would take to recover my initial investment once I start selling pizzas.

I don’t expect this to be a huge money maker, but I will only move forward if I’m reasonably sure it will have positive cash flow.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-04-2019, 11:33 PM
 
10,077 posts, read 5,380,256 times
Reputation: 15422
You can't afford it... nearly half a million to buy into it but cost aside, if you are asking here and your idea stems from working at walmart, you probably aren't going to run a business well without a lot more experience other than you don't want to go to your car to get food

how do you imagine this to be a "positive cash flow" when you work 3 jobs as it is? this isn't some rent-a-business, you have to be there all day every day to make sure no one is stealing from you and to manage it

don't go into business expecting it to "not" be a "huge money maker", if your goal is breaking even or a slight profit, go flip a house and rent it out
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-05-2019, 03:29 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
16,372 posts, read 5,648,399 times
Reputation: 13150
Quote:
Originally Posted by Magic Qwan View Post
I moonlight at walmart on the weekends and on afternoons and one thing I always want when I’m there is a slice of pizza. There is a pizza place across the street, but I have to actually go out to my car and cross 4 lanes of busy traffic to get there. I make 45k a year from my teaching job and 16/hour from my pharmacy assistant job, and work on average about 30 hours a week in the pharmacy. It wouldn’t take me long to save and purchase a Sbarro franchise for my store. My question is how I can calculate if I can cover my overhead as well as how long it would take to recover my initial investment once I start selling pizzas.

I don’t expect this to be a huge money maker, but I will only move forward if I’m reasonably sure it will have positive cash flow.
Without reading any of the other responses -- I am remembering that Sbarro's went out of business? Or am I wrong about that?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-05-2019, 04:02 AM
 
47 posts, read 19,834 times
Reputation: 122
Sbarro's went bankrupt twice, but they came out of it and are still operating with about half the locations they originally had. The estimated cost to set up a franchise is a low of $355K to a high of $675K.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-05-2019, 04:11 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
16,372 posts, read 5,648,399 times
Reputation: 13150
Quote:
Originally Posted by HuskyBeaver View Post
Sbarro's went bankrupt twice, but they came out of it and are still operating with about half the locations they originally had. The estimated cost to set up a franchise is a low of $355K to a high of $675K.
Thanks. Seems like a lot of money to invest in a chain that doesn't appear to know what they are doing.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-05-2019, 12:03 PM
 
Location: Shreveport, LA
1,430 posts, read 1,122,683 times
Reputation: 770
I did more research and it would appear that the only franchise I could afford would be Champ’s Chicken.

I’ll just stick to saving money and investing 20% of those savings into index funds.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-05-2019, 12:09 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
8,717 posts, read 3,931,533 times
Reputation: 13380
You're just one get-rich-quick scheme after another, aren't you?

Yeah, it sucks to build personal wealth on hourly pay. But short of a winning lottery ticket or robbing banks, it's the only way to get to a level where you can fund a career investment, be it a one-man agency of some kind or a franchise. Trying to do the latter on the most frayed shoestring just means you'll be back to a long stretch of hourly paychecks soon.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-07-2019, 09:29 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
24,661 posts, read 32,324,992 times
Reputation: 50044
Why pay franchise fees? You can buy all the equipment and get really good instructions on how to use it. All the food is available at the restaurant supply store. Information about making pizza is online. Walmart will tell you how much rent they want.


Good frozen pizza dough is available at the restaurant supply store.



Local cabinet makers will help you design counters and tell you how much to make them. Ditto for flooring, paint, computers, everything you need.


If you can keep the price down, it should work well to sell by the slice in Walmart (if their hot deli doesn't already sell pizza.)


It is a full time job, supervising, training employees, filling in when workers don't show up.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-07-2019, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
8,717 posts, read 3,931,533 times
Reputation: 13380
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
It is a full time job, supervising, training employees, filling in when workers don't show up.
It's only full time if you consider working 5 am to 2 am "full time."
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-11-2019, 02:52 PM
 
7,823 posts, read 3,417,893 times
Reputation: 7080
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
Why pay franchise fees? You can buy all the equipment and get really good instructions on how to use it. All the food is available at the restaurant supply store. Information about making pizza is online. Walmart will tell you how much rent they want.


Good frozen pizza dough is available at the restaurant supply store.



Local cabinet makers will help you design counters and tell you how much to make them. Ditto for flooring, paint, computers, everything you need.


If you can keep the price down, it should work well to sell by the slice in Walmart (if their hot deli doesn't already sell pizza.)


It is a full time job, supervising, training employees, filling in when workers don't show up.

Do you know of a Wal-Mart that's going to let in an independent pizza joint that's owned/operated by a neophyte restaurateur?
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Economics > Business
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top