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Old 03-09-2010, 02:12 PM
 
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Brightdoglover you always make good posts. The big issue is the jobs will not be there. There will be hiring in the future. But it will be in India and China low wage labor markets. They US will have more low wage pat time or temp work. There always saying in the media we need 600 to 800k of nurses in the future but the BLS and media are counting on mass numbers of workers retiring. And as you point out that is not going to happen. I know tons of nurses of in their 50"s they are not going anywhere. They do not have the cash to retire. I know three that retired after working into their 70's This gose for teachers and a whole host of workers.
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Old 03-09-2010, 02:19 PM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
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collegeguy35 wrote:
The big issue is the jobs will not be there.
Actually there will be lots of jobs....if you want to be a a self employed massage therapist or a self employed network marketer. Everyone can exchange massages and join each others downlines. This will get the economy humming again.
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Old 03-09-2010, 06:32 PM
 
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I could not have said it better myself. I like the way you think my friend lol. Btw I think you are telling what our future job market will look like.
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Old 03-09-2010, 06:42 PM
 
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YouTube - MNN-Trading Our Future
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Old 03-09-2010, 10:51 PM
 
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Well, a lot of nurses will be retiring- not in our 50s (since when was retirement in one's 50s anyway?) but 60s, yes, especially if they have a pension plan, an old-fashioned one like 82 percent of American workers used to have, and now it's something like 17 percent (and that might include government workers).
For the first time in some time, my hospital has no jobs available for nurses. They advertise for "per diem" for specific services- but they owe nothing to the per diem, who owes nothing back in terms of shifts. On the assistant level, there is more turnover, as people who want to have references for grad school come to work here regularly. They are terribly over-educated, and often very snotty about thei schooling (so who is going to get the smelly psychotic guy into the shower?)
But there's an endless parade of new shiny therapist wanna-be's behind each crop.
There is little turnover on third shift. I guess we're all in the saddle for the pension.
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Old 03-10-2010, 12:02 AM
 
133 posts, read 257,590 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aliveandwellinSA View Post
So you are going to wait around for someone else to do something?

Try this on for size. If I had waited around I would be whining right now also.

When I got out of high school I decided to go to college, no money, didn't get loans, no grant. I got two jobs, one from 6am to 10am washing dishes, the second job from 7pm to 11pm pumping gas. Yes personal responsibility, didn't wait for anyone else, did it myself.

Saved 5% of every paycheck for 20 years. No fancy cars and no fancy houses. Finished my BA degree in 2 1/2 years, went straight through summers etc.
Went to Law School with the same methodology. Retired at 41 years old, that was 20 years ago, saved for my own retirement, didn't count on the government or anyone else to take care of me or my family.
It, once again is personal responsibility, but I guess you have got to want it bad enough to go out and get it. I guess some just rather sit around and complain.

Yes you are correct listing all those that need to learn personal responsibility, but move on and control what you can in your life.
When i was young it was known that minimum wage jobs were for kids living with a parent.Sort of the minor leagues for kids of poorer parents.I was blessed with a place to live,ate so much i was fat,was allways clothed and we drove down to florida once a year for vacation,in our awesome station wagon.Dad worked as a mechanic in a dodge dealership.Dad taught me how to do a tuneup by 10(me watching and occasionally pulling on the end of a socket wrench)and we had AC in that brandy new 6 yr.old wagon.First i had to mow the lawn of course.Push mower for those that know what that was.I got my "working papers" by 14 and made $1.10? an hour.Big time!!! Summer job.Started at the potato chips and soda,and moved up to french fries by the end of the summer.Next summer up to $1.35 and got the grill.I grilled the dogs and burgers and worked the register at my station.I was loaded and could by my girlfiend an ice cream and take her to the movies.



When i made $1.35 minimum i think dad made $6.00 fulltime and was very proud that i was making $50.00 bucks a week.I had to bank $40 and had $10 bucks a week to do as i pleased.I guess it was good that i didn't get married and have kids when i was making $1.35 an hour.


Eventually i made $16 a night as a dishwasher and then $120 pumping gas a week while in high school.I had $2,400 in the bank when 16 and made sure i got my moneys worth when i bought my first car for $250.Again i say,....who ended up so mixed up that the world owes you a living at minimum wage???
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Old 03-10-2010, 12:27 AM
 
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Somehow there became a time when poorer kids didn't want to work.Their parents didn't want to realize they weren't rich.Then the people that needed that labor to survive couldn't find any kids to work. Thats when the downward spiral started.The illegals started washing dishes,flipping burgers,pumping gas.Nobody noticed at first.The kids would laugh at the people who traveled 1,000's of miles to do these jobs.Their parents started using credit to buy things besides a house.How did that work out?
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Old 03-10-2010, 07:58 AM
 
Location: Virginia Beach, VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pinefarm View Post
Somehow there became a time when poorer kids didn't want to work.
Could this have happened somewhere around the early 80's

http://www.epi.org/page/-/old/issueg...ge/figure1.pdf

When the real value of minimum wage started tanking and didnt even recover the slightest bit until Clinton took office? Thats probably about when "poorer kids" decided that being slaves to the capitalist didnt make any sense. Since the "poorer kids" refused to be slaves, businesses simply went for more desperate labor, instead of giving their employees a bigger piece of the pie.

In 1969 (probably somewhere around when you were young), minimum wage reached its peak value of over $8.50 an hour. At no point from about 1957 to 1987 was minimum wage worth less then it is right now.

You, my friend, are from an era that minimum wage could nearly buy you a modest life style. The youth of the 80's, and 90's were not remotely as lucky.
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Old 03-10-2010, 11:42 AM
 
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I am pretty sure you needed to make more than $40 a week in 72 to pay rent,utilities and food.It did afford me a great lifestyle at 14.I could buy myself things my parents couldn't,and start a bank account.It also taught me responsibility.There were never any adults working in the jobs i had.The adults had learned skills that paid more money.When i washed dishes i learned how to cook from the adult chef.If i went that route i wouldn't have been paid minimum wage to be a chef.Not mcdonalds but a real restaurant where people pay more than $5 for dinner.I am almost completely certain that minimum wage was never meant to be a salary to support yourself or a family.I also only worked for minimum at 14 and 15.After that i had skills to earn more.Eventually much much more.
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Old 03-10-2010, 12:58 PM
 
Location: Virginia Beach, VA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pinefarm View Post
I am pretty sure you needed to make more than $40 a week in 72 to pay rent,utilities and food.It did afford me a great lifestyle at 14.I could buy myself things my parents couldn't,and start a bank account.It also taught me responsibility.There were never any adults working in the jobs i had.The adults had learned skills that paid more money.
Adults are overeducated and overtrained for the available jobs today. That is why you find so many of them in "low end" jobs. Underemployment in the USA is rampant. My fiance knows several people she graduated college with who now work in retail.

Additionally, not all of your parents had "skills". What they did have though were factory jobs that paid them good money for doing such "skilled work" as screwing the same screw all day long.
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