Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Indiana > Northwest Indiana
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-03-2009, 04:47 PM
 
Location: Turn Left at Greenland
17,764 posts, read 39,734,665 times
Reputation: 8253

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by sukwoo View Post
Not that I agree with the anti-transit folks, but to be fair, the Arlington Heights Metra line doesn't go through Gary on the way to Chicago.
But Valpo isn't going to turn into Gary if the South Shore stopped there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-07-2009, 10:16 AM
 
211 posts, read 947,879 times
Reputation: 120
Really what does a train riding through a certain area have anything to do with the remainder of the stops? Do people really believe that there are criminals just waiting for the train line to run through Valpo so they can jump on the train to go rob and rape and then hop back on the train to go home? It doesn't even make sense. Anyone from any part of Chicago can hop on the metra to Glencoe or Naperville or any other suburb pretty much to do the same and yet they don't. Also, a lot of the Metra lines run through some not so great areas and then some really great areas. The train helped make Naperville what it is. The CEO of a company I used to work for had a farm in Naperville in the late 70's. He sold it in the early 90's for millions. Really though besides the train and proximity to xpressways Naperville's appeal is their school system and highly educated residents. This is what brings businesses and jobs. It wasn't always like that. The housing boom began in the 80's there. Before that it was alot of farm land. To get that great school system they pay incredibly high property taxes. They believed investing in their community was worth it and it paid off. NW Indiana is too focused on manufacturing. The educated tend to leave as I did because the white collar jobs are just not there. Moving back we had a lot of hope that things were changing. The train extension was driving that hope but that does not seem to be happening any time soon. Why would a company want to invest in a community that won't invest in themselves?!

In all honesty this has been one of the biggest disappointments for me having recently moved from the city. I have great concern about the future of the area in terms of jobs. I live in NW Valpo so probably as close to the train as you can get and its a huge pain especially in the winter when I feel truly accomplished just making it to the train station alive via ice rink 49 or what my husband likes to refer as the Indy 49 (is it just us or do people drive really fast on it). When I see all the nice houses in Valpo I always wonder where these people work (if anyone knows, please fill me in).

Having grown up in Hammond I do not think the South Shore had anything to do with the state of Hammond, EC and Gary. Growing up I knew no one who worked in the city. It was all steel mill workers like my father. My father said (and I must add a disclaimer that my father isn't exactly known for the accuracy of his comments) when he started at Inland Steel in 1958 there were about 40,000 employees. When he retired in 1998 there were 8,000. That's a lot of job loss for an area to absorb. Especially when entire areas were dependent on those jobs. Not just Inland but Gary Steel and LTV and I forget the other one, US Steel? Anyway, I started commuting from Hammond in 1991 and there really weren't very many people commuting at that time and the area was in a steady decline even then. I think had it not been for the South shore trains the area would be much worse. At least there is an easy way to get to good jobs.

I don't even remember what I was responding too. Oh ya how to get to Chicago from Valpo.... I find the South Shore is the easiest. Driving isn't too bad usually. In the morning rush it takes us about 1 hour and 15 minutes. Home is longer but really not too bad (we take the toll road when we drive). Train is about 1 hour 25 minutes and I personally usually enjoy the time to read (or nap in the morning).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-07-2009, 10:32 AM
 
Location: Oak Park, IL
5,525 posts, read 13,953,705 times
Reputation: 3908
Quote:
Originally Posted by domergurl View Post
But Valpo isn't going to turn into Gary if the South Shore stopped there.
No, but improved transit access works both ways. There's a perception (not born out by statistics) that improving transit access makes it easier for the criminals from the bad parts of town to come "rape, rob and pillage" in the previously isolated "good parts of town", ie Valpo. This problem of perception is a nationwide phenomenon, unfortunately. I'm not really sure of a good solution other than persistent attempts at education about the benefits of transit.

Also, as a state, Indiana has been the most resistant to supporting rail transit out of all the midwest. This obviously causes problems for Illinois, as all Amtrak trains heading east go through Indiana, where they are often slowed to a standstill due to rail congestion.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-07-2009, 10:34 AM
 
Location: Turn Left at Greenland
17,764 posts, read 39,734,665 times
Reputation: 8253
cd ... great post!

Quote:
In all honesty this has been one of the biggest disappointments for me having recently moved from the city. I have great concern about the future of the area in terms of jobs. I live in NW Valpo so probably as close to the train as you can get and its a huge pain especially in the winter when I feel truly accomplished just making it to the train station alive via ice rink 49 or what my husband likes to refer as the Indy 49 (is it just us or do people drive really fast on it). When I see all the nice houses in Valpo I always wonder where these people work (if anyone knows, please fill me in).
Yes, people drive like the dickens on 49. It's a straight shot to the expressway and to the train ... if you can time the lights right, it's really fast!

As for wondering where all the people with the nice homes work? My husband used to ask the very same question!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-07-2009, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Hoosierville
17,426 posts, read 14,650,567 times
Reputation: 11639
Quote:
Originally Posted by domergurl View Post
cd ... great post!



Yes, people drive like the dickens on 49. It's a straight shot to the expressway and to the train ... if you can time the lights right, it's really fast!

As for wondering where all the people with the nice homes work? My husband used to ask the very same question!
I'll answer! (Because before I moved out here I always thought the same thing - how can people afford a nice house if they don't work in Chicago! LOL)

Here's who lives out here: a lot of manufacturing business executives (steel mill, etc), business owners (my subdivision & the immediate area has the owners of Chili Bowl, Northside Tap & Culvers), doctors, teachers (my next door neighbors are professors at VU), etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-07-2009, 03:23 PM
j33
 
4,626 posts, read 14,089,265 times
Reputation: 1719
Quote:
Originally Posted by sukwoo View Post
No, but improved transit access works both ways. There's a perception (not born out by statistics) that improving transit access makes it easier for the criminals from the bad parts of town to come "rape, rob and pillage" in the previously isolated "good parts of town", ie Valpo. This problem of perception is a nationwide phenomenon, unfortunately. I'm not really sure of a good solution other than persistent attempts at education about the benefits of transit.

Also, as a state, Indiana has been the most resistant to supporting rail transit out of all the midwest. This obviously causes problems for Illinois, as all Amtrak trains heading east go through Indiana, where they are often slowed to a standstill due to rail congestion.
I've always had this absurd mental image of some cartoon criminal with a sack of loot (mask, stripped shirt, etc) waiting around for the train to come on a Sunday afternoon, whenever anyone brought up this absurd argument. What thief takes the train? Honestly.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Indiana > Northwest Indiana
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top