U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Oregon
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-06-2012, 04:58 PM
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
7,785 posts, read 17,060,401 times
Reputation: 10692

Advertisements

We frequently have threads in which people ask about jobs in an area - here is a ranking of unemployment* in US metropolitan areas by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, dated June 2012. There are 372 metro areas on the list. You can check the list for your own area and that will give you a general idea of what unemployment here is like compared to where you are now.

Unemployment Rates for Metropolitan Areas

(the higher the ranking number, the higher the unemployment %. I've added a bit of geographical info after the metro area to help locate it for those new to the state)

66 - Corvallis, Oregon; 6.4% (mid-Willamette Valley, home of the Oregon State University)
184 - Portland, Oregon; 8.0% (Oregon's largest city, northern Willamette Valley)
212 - Eugene-Springfield; 8.5% (southern end of the Willamette Valley, home of the University of Oregon)
259 - Salem Oregon; 9.1% (mid-Willamette Valley, Oregon's capital city)
329 - Bend Oregon; 10.5% (Central Oregon, on the east side of the Cascade Mountains)
335 - Medford, Oregon; 10.7% (Rogue Valley, Southern Oregon)

Keep in mind that Corvallis and Eugene are college towns where the college students make up a very large percentage of the population and that skews the stats a bit. Smaller towns not listed generally have higher unemployment numbers than the larger MSAs.





*(Remember that this is the U3 unemployment rate, which does NOT count long-term discouraged, those who are underemployed, or those only working part-time, so it's the lowest percentage of the 6 classes of unemployment. The highest class of unemployment, the U6, is almost double the U3)
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-06-2012, 05:03 PM
 
Location: Dallas, Oregon & Sunsites Arizona
8,000 posts, read 15,818,402 times
Reputation: 2813
That says it all. Any more dreamers going to quit their jobs and run to Oregon?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-06-2012, 05:10 PM
 
Location: Salem, OR
14,929 posts, read 36,648,572 times
Reputation: 15336
Bend is only 10.5%? I would have thought it was higher as I think their MSA covers all of Deschutes. I know the Salem MSA is Marion and Polk counties together.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-06-2012, 05:10 PM
 
Location: Bay Area
1,724 posts, read 2,585,510 times
Reputation: 1135
Quote:
Originally Posted by PNW-type-gal View Post
We frequently have threads in which people ask about jobs in an area - here is a ranking of unemployment* in US metropolitan areas by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, dated June 2012. There are 372 metro areas on the list. You can check the list for your own area and that will give you a general idea of what unemployment here is like compared to where you are now.

Unemployment Rates for Metropolitan Areas

(the higher the ranking number, the higher the unemployment %. I've added a bit of geographical info after the metro area to help locate it for those new to the state)

66 - Corvallis, Oregon; 6.4% (mid-Willamette Valley, home of the Oregon State University)
184 - Portland, Oregon; 8.0% (Oregon's largest city, northern Willamette Valley)
212 - Eugene-Springfield; 8.5% (southern end of the Willamette Valley, home of the University of Oregon)
259 - Salem Oregon; 9.1% (mid-Willamette Valley, Oregon's capital city)
329 - Bend Oregon; 10.5% (Central Oregon, on the east side of the Cascade Mountains)
335 - Medford, Oregon; 10.7% (Rogue Valley, Southern Oregon)

Keep in mind that Corvallis and Eugene are college towns where the college students make up a very large percentage of the population and that skews the stats a bit. Smaller towns not listed generally have higher unemployment numbers than the larger MSAs.





*(Remember that this is the U3 unemployment rate, which does NOT count long-term discouraged, those who are underemployed, or those only working part-time, so it's the lowest percentage of the 6 classes of unemployment. The highest class of unemployment, the U6, is almost double the U3)
thank you for that list. makes sense that i couldn't find anything living here:
356 Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, CA Metropolitan Statistical Area 12.6

and now am barely above that here!

335 - Medford, Oregon; 10.7% (Rogue Valley, Southern Oregon)

i'm surprised albuquerque is so low. thought it was bad there now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Pickering View Post
That says it all. Any more dreamers going to quit their jobs and run to Oregon?
no, i'm gonna quit my job and run OUT of oregon!

Last edited by Kimballette; 08-22-2012 at 09:34 PM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-06-2012, 05:23 PM
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
7,785 posts, read 17,060,401 times
Reputation: 10692
Quote:
Originally Posted by 5thgenSF View Post
thank you for that list. makes sense that i couldn't find anything living here:
356 Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, CA Metropolitan Statistical Area 12.6

and now am barely above that here!

335 - Medford, Oregon; 10.7% (Rogue Valley, Southern Oregon)
As Silverfall pointed out, it depends on how large an area an MSA covers. Within the city limits of Medford, the unemployment number is likely lower than that of the entire MSA, which includes the surrounding smaller communities, many of which were timber/resource-based and have had chronically high unemployment for decades.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-06-2012, 05:26 PM
 
Location: Portland Metro
2,301 posts, read 4,209,429 times
Reputation: 2733
Wow. California's Central Valley, from Redding down to Bakersfield, is a mess!

What is it, though, about university towns that set them apart? They seem to generally have lower unemployment rates. Not talking about cities which have a university district (like Eugene), but rather towns that are built around the university, like Corvallis (Lawrence, KS, State College, PA, College Station, TX).
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-06-2012, 05:34 PM
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
7,785 posts, read 17,060,401 times
Reputation: 10692
This is also not seasonally adjusted data, so take the numbers as ballpark and not absolute.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jjpop View Post
Wow. California's Central Valley, from Redding down to Bakersfield, is a mess!

What is it, though, about university towns that set them apart? They seem to generally have lower unemployment rates. Not talking about cities which have a university district (like Eugene), but rather towns that are built around the university, like Corvallis (Lawrence, KS, State College, PA, College Station, TX).
Because the unemployment rate only counts those actively looking for work (and generally full-time work at that) - most students aren't looking for full-time work.

Parts of the San Joaquin/Sacramento Valley had HUGE population spikes as the housing boom bubbled its way to the top over a decade or so - cities like Stockton and Modesto were being pushed as "bedroom communities" for the Bay area (despite the insane commute in). The housing boom pushed the jobs boom and when housing collapsed there was nothing left - these are generally agriculture-based communities.

Pretty similar to what happened in a lot of the smaller Oregon communities as they had mini-booms as retirement/second home towns. Klamath Falls, for instance, had 20 years of unemployment around 10% because of the timber cut-backs, but during the 2000s, it actually dropped to around 5.75%. It's back around 11.1% now (from a high of 15.5% in 2009) and there is much hand-wringing about how to get it down, but it's more that the housing bubble pushed it unusually low than that the rate is now unusually high.

Last edited by Kimballette; 08-22-2012 at 09:34 PM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-06-2012, 05:43 PM
 
Location: Portland Metro
2,301 posts, read 4,209,429 times
Reputation: 2733
Quote:
Originally Posted by PNW-type-gal View Post
Because the unemployment rate only counts those actively looking for work (and generally full-time work at that).
I think that makes sense. For example, if 15,000 of Corvallis's 50,000 residents are students not looking for full-time work, then that effectively reduces the working population to 35,000 folks. At 6.4% unemployment, that means that about 2200 people are unemployed and actively looking.

Even with that number, though, it's hard for me to imagine what 2200 people would do to find a job in Corvallis. There's just not that much going on there. I think a lot of people were like me--you look for a while and then leave town when you can't find work.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-06-2012, 05:52 PM
 
Location: Bay Area
1,724 posts, read 2,585,510 times
Reputation: 1135
Quote:
Originally Posted by PNW-type-gal View Post
As Silverfall pointed out, it depends on how large an area an MSA covers. Within the city limits of Medford, the unemployment number is likely lower than that of the entire MSA, which includes the surrounding smaller communities, many of which were timber/resource-based and have had chronically high unemployment for decades.
this is probably more likely:
Moderator cut: link removed, competitor site


The unemployment rate in Roseburg, OR, is 14.00%, with job growth of -1.26%. Future job growth over the next ten years is predicted to be 23.48%.

Roseburg, OR,sales tax rate is 0.00%. Income tax is 9.00%.

Roseburg, OR Income and Salaries

The income per capita is $20,611, which includes all adults and children. The median household income is $37,040.

Last edited by Yac; 09-07-2018 at 04:36 AM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-06-2012, 07:21 PM
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
7,785 posts, read 17,060,401 times
Reputation: 10692
Quote:
Originally Posted by 5thgenSF View Post
Future job growth over the next ten years is predicted to be 23.48%.
Gotta love projections like that. What are they based on? An entire new industry magically moving into town?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Oregon

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top