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Old 09-04-2011, 04:11 PM
 
1,097 posts, read 2,036,567 times
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I am looking for advice from people in the Finance industry.

I had considered getting an MS in Finance because I felt if one had a technical skill and degree, they could be in a very good position to get a good career.
I was considering going into Investment Management.

Upon further review, I am wondering if perhaps Financial Analytics is a better fit. Based on my research, a few red flags stick out:
-Financial Investment jobs are VERY hard to get, very competitive
-You might work reasonable hours or you may work ridiculously long hours and get burnout

I was told on the other hand that Financial Analytics, while paying less, is much more stable with jobs constantly in demand. Further it was hinted this field is less demanding with hours, and in fact has a decent number in public sector.


OK, so here are my questions:


1) What exactly is "Financial Analytics" and what qualifies or would be examples of careers in this field?

2) What degree would somebody need to get employed in the field?
-Would an MS Finance work (for somebody with a previous degree not in business) or do you really needing one in Accounting?

3) What is the job environment like? Work/life balance is big for me, 40-50 hour weeks, with a more planned schedule, as opposed to putting out fires and doing 70 hours weeks, is a fit.
-Would Financial Analytics over this environment?
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Old 09-05-2011, 10:36 PM
 
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Reputation: 501
??????????????????
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Old 09-06-2011, 06:48 AM
 
1,922 posts, read 3,640,310 times
Reputation: 1338
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hudlander View Post
I am looking for advice from people in the Finance industry.

I had considered getting an MS in Finance because I felt if one had a technical skill and degree, they could be in a very good position to get a good career.
I was considering going into Investment Management.

Upon further review, I am wondering if perhaps Financial Analytics is a better fit. Based on my research, a few red flags stick out:
-Financial Investment jobs are VERY hard to get, very competitive
-You might work reasonable hours or you may work ridiculously long hours and get burnout

I was told on the other hand that Financial Analytics, while paying less, is much more stable with jobs constantly in demand. Further it was hinted this field is less demanding with hours, and in fact has a decent number in public sector.


OK, so here are my questions:


1) What exactly is "Financial Analytics" and what qualifies or would be examples of careers in this field?

2) What degree would somebody need to get employed in the field?
-Would an MS Finance work (for somebody with a previous degree not in business) or do you really needing one in Accounting?

3) What is the job environment like? Work/life balance is big for me, 40-50 hour weeks, with a more planned schedule, as opposed to putting out fires and doing 70 hours weeks, is a fit.
-Would Financial Analytics over this environment?
Hi Hudlander. As a recent graduate in Finance I can try to help you out here. I'm interested in both analytics and research and have done extensive research into breaking into the field, which I have not done yet. My favorite websites I have used throughout school and to this day include wiseGEEK: clear answers for common questions and Investopedia.com - Your Source For Investing Education

1. Financial analytics is a set of tools or a system that can be used to increase a company's financial productivity, specifically its profitability. It works through assessing individual or granular aspects of a business opportunity and then combining all relevant information so that an overarching, financially beneficial decision can be made. Financial analytics allows business executives to proactively seek out ways to change and enhance their business models so that they are constantly up-to-date with the current financial environment. (wiseGEEK: clear answers for common questions)
*these can be Jr. Analyst positions all the way to Sr. Analyst positions. Most companies with finance departments have analyst working in them.*

2. If you don't have an undergrad in Finance then an MS will be suitable ONLY if you do not have the necessary work experience. I would recommend getting an MBA from a very good program. It does not have to be top tier, although you should aim for a top tier school and at least apply to a couple. If it isn't top tier, you should find out the percentage of students who receive employment opportunities through the career services office, if they have annual job fairs and if they have connections to potential employers. For example, since I do not yet have work experience in finance, I am considering an MS in International Finance because I would like to work in research/analytics for the currency exchange market. Then once I gain experience, I would like to go for an Executive MBA. Mind you, your work experience doesn't have to be industry related. If you've had any business experience for at least 2-3 years, you are a good MBA candidate since an MBA is a broad program, although it can be specific if you choose it to be.

3. This could vary based on the company you work for. I know a very prominent analyst who has worked with LVMH (Louis Vuitton Moet & Hennesy) group and had to travel to Paris regularly, as well as learn French. Its a very involved position, and although it is very lucrative, you will still dedicate A LOT of time to your work. One week you may work 40 hours, and the next you may work 60. The next you may be on a red-eye out of the country or across the country.

If you are interested in become an Analyst, I would suggest that you start doing a lot of research and even networking. Attending finance events regularly, joining organizations, looking into schools, asking questions, etc. I wish you the best & good luck with everything!!

*Don't forget internships! They prepare you for the experience & show you if it's really something you are truly interested in*
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Old 09-06-2011, 01:21 PM
 
1,097 posts, read 2,036,567 times
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Thank you. I have sent a PM, so if possible answer here or PM.

I am interested in doing financial analytics since compared to investments:
A. It seems they have better job prospects
B. It would seem to be less demanding and offer better work/life balance
C. More opportunites are there in the public sector

1) Is this all true?

2) I do not have experience to get an MBA, but I take it an MS Finance would prepare somebody fine for this kind of work? I fearfully you needed an accounting degree or to be highly proficient in computers.
-So an MS Finance will be fine?

3) What degree did you get and why haven't you broke through? I thought an MS Finance=almost guarenteed work.
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Old 09-06-2011, 01:47 PM
 
1,922 posts, read 3,640,310 times
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You’re welcome! You have different questions here than on your PM so I will answer both for you.

1. This is true to an extent. Better job prospects depends on which part of the country you live in and the demand for financial analyst positions. A lot of jobs are filled before they are even advertised or made aware by the general public. If you are truly interested in gaining employment, I would recommend a headhunter who knows about opportunities within certain organizations way before the general public.

2. A MS Finance will definitely prepare you MORE for this type of work since it is a specialized degree. You do not need an accounting degree, or be highly efficient to study your designated program. The purpose of the MS is to actually train you in such endeavors and make you a suitable candidate for any opportunity that may present itself. For the schools you are most interested in, I would recommend looking at the courses you will take as a student.

3. I currently have a BS in Finance from a smaller university in the southern region of the US. I live in one of the most competitive parts of the country for Finance which is the tri-state nyc/nj area. I am competing with students from many top tier schools including Princeton, NYU, Columbia & Rutgers. I do not have many connections here since I didn’t attend school here but have been attending industry related functions and networking extensively. I also do not have any internship experience, which is crucial nowadays as the market is getting tougher. It will be harder to find a job in Finance for me than many other candidates, which is why I am considering the MS to make myself a more worthy competitor. My choices of schools are either Princeton or Rutgers, since the other schools only have MBA programs and Columbia has a new Finance program that accepts only 1% of applicants and is comparable to receiving a Phd. In other words, a degree does guarantee work, but the time to finding that work varies on the candidate and a variety of external factors. Lastly, an MS will make you more attractive than a BS to potential employers.
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Old 09-21-2011, 10:44 PM
 
1,097 posts, read 2,036,567 times
Reputation: 501
Thanks.

Question on Financial Analytics v Investment

I desire a job with good pay but fits my personality.
-40 to 50 hour predictable weeks with usually no overtime, good work-life balance, structure, autonomy....sounds like investments is NOT a fit!
But it sounds like you think financial analytics is, do I understand you correctly?

Do you think given my personality listed I fit this field?

Thanks!
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Old 09-23-2011, 11:01 AM
 
1,097 posts, read 2,036,567 times
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Can anybody help and or give an example of a career under the financial analytics umbrella?

Would a budget or credit analyst be one?

Unlike investments, can you have a good 40 hour week work life balance?
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Old 09-24-2011, 08:27 PM
 
1,097 posts, read 2,036,567 times
Reputation: 501
??????????
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