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Old 08-13-2016, 12:40 PM
 
Location: Southern California
23,668 posts, read 8,235,451 times
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I know this to be a powerful antioxidant and don't know how much for allergy issues. You might want to do more research.

5 Reasons to Take Astaxanthin Every Day
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Old 08-13-2016, 03:31 PM
 
Location: .N6 A4
3,475 posts, read 4,370,745 times
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That's another supplement that has stimulant properties and can cause insomnia. I usually don't react well to anything to things like that. The krill oil I tried had that in it, and might have been causing problems, but I was taking so many other things at that time that I am not sure. I need to resume krill oil again in the future, to start with. I have some left in a bottle in my frigrigerator, and it will be good for a while. I definitely don't want to try anything stimulating right now, since I want to get a relatively clean look at what magnesium does.

(I did have some passion flower last night, with the magnesium, but I've used passion flower before and I know what it does to me.)
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Old 08-13-2016, 07:27 PM
 
Location: Southern California
23,668 posts, read 8,235,451 times
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Well, I'll throw one more thing out. I've been taking MSM powder probably since 1999 when I was dx'd with Fibro. I've stayed with it all these years and it does help, so I continue and take usually daily 2 tsps in 8 oz water 2-3 times daily. I recently upped my dose from 1 tsp dose. When I first found this MSM in 1999 I bought a book on the "miracle sulfur" and there is a chapter on allergy/sinus issues and MSM and I thought about this today. So here is one more thought from me and then I'll leave you alone.

I do nicely with Gaba most nights and have used Lemon Balm too.

https://draxe.com/msm-supplement/


Hate to hear how much your suffer with all allergies. Look at this later if it's too much now. Work with the mag.
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Old 08-14-2016, 09:46 AM
 
Location: .N6 A4
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Thanks, MSM is not something I've looked into that I can recall.

Yes, right now I am mostly trying to get the dose of magnesium right.
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Old 08-15-2016, 10:47 AM
 
Location: Massachusetts
6,105 posts, read 7,259,812 times
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Weather related, this sounds like a dust mite allergy rather than pollen? I know because I have this. The OTC Sudafed/Pseudoephedrine type products work best for me with the sneezies and stuffy nose. I take Benadryl for hives and skin related allergy but I find it does not help me at all with nasal related symptoms. Benadryl is not such a great product to take long term as it can cause you to fall asleep while driving or at your desk, if you take a bigger dose or take it too often. The Sudafed doesn't make me jumpy, but it can do that to some people, but at least it won't make you fall asleep during the daytime.
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Old 10-15-2016, 09:52 AM
 
Location: .N6 A4
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Default Here we go again. . .

Since I've already talked about it in two threads, I might as well add something about it here.

I don't know if this is going to ultimately work, but it seems promising.

I finally tried a treatment called chemical cautery, which my ENT had actually recommended more enthusiastically than surgery a couple years back.

Quote:
In the early part of the 20th Century, researchers developed chemical cautery, a superficial chemical treatment of the nasal passages, to promote drainage of the sinuses and relieve sinus pain sufferers of their ongoing symptoms. Physicians at the Midwest Sinus Center at Rush have revived the in-office procedure and have satisfied many patients.

Mast cells, the cells that release histamine and other inflammatory mediators, congregate in the sinus cavities and are often the culprit for the sinus pain, swelling and inflammation. Chemical cautery can destroy the mast cells through a process similar to a chemical peel for the face. The fewer mast cells, the less congestion the patient will experience.

Chemical cautery is recommended when symptoms persist and medications are producing only moderate relief. The relatively painless treatment consists of a series of short steps that begin when the physician coats the inside of the patient's nostrils with a topical anesthetic agent. Next, a decongestant is sprayed in each nostril to prepare the lining to absorb the next sprays of the treatment's active ingredient, phenol. Phenol, an organic anti-oxidant, acts gradually as an acid burn of the cells lining the sinus cavity. Then, the patient tips his or her head forward and the sinus discharge seeps out. After draining, a menthol-like rinse is sprayed up into the nose and a sterilized oil is rubbed onto the nasal lining to prevent dryness.

"By intentionally irritating the lining of the nose, we desensitize it to make it less reactive to irritants from the environment. Desensitization will result in less congestion so the patient will be able to breathe better and their sinuses will drain more freely. Sinuses that drain efficiently will heal infection more effectively," said Rush otorhinolaryngologist Dr. Neal Lofchy.
https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0519064214.htm

(As an aside, I do not see much evidence of chemical cautery being practiced back east. I wonder if there is a regional bias at play. It's an old procedure revived in the Midwest. Maybe that is two strikes against it in some people's minds? I expect it will catch on nationally at some point though.)

So what happened after my one treatment? I had six really great days, when my sinuses were much "quieter" than usual. No pressure to speak of. This included at least one day when rain was in the area, which I mention since that's usually a trigger for sinus pressure, for me. Then things went back to the unfortunate normal for about a week. After that, I started using Sinus Buster, which had also been recommended by my ENT. I have now gone a week without using sudafed, which is pretty good for me, though not completely unheard of.

The full effect of chemical cautery is not expected to occur until after three treatments, so I am optimistic that between chemical cautery and Sinus Buster I will be able to eliminate most of my problem with sinus pressure.

Fatigue in reaction to barometric pressure changes might be another matter, but this new experiment is just getting started.
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Old 10-15-2016, 10:09 AM
 
Location: .N6 A4
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Here's a (sometimes pretty technical) presentation I just found on vasomotor rhinitis:

https://prezi.com/pbhzyf7qydrk/whats...-with-my-nose/
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Old 11-11-2016, 02:23 PM
 
Location: .N6 A4
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Had my second treatment at the end of October and so far November has been a terrible month for my sinuses, but I think that's not so much to do with vasomotor sinusitis and more to do with a head cold that turned into a sinus infection. Maybe knocking out mast cells isn't such a good idea after all?

I'll probably go through with the third treatment later this month, but I'm no longer optimistic that this is a solution.

So, as usual, I probably spoke too soon.
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Old 12-31-2016, 03:40 PM
 
Location: .N6 A4
3,475 posts, read 4,370,745 times
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In the month of December, I've been doing measurably better than the usual (going back at least a few years). I think periodic chemical cautery + Sinus Buster as needed, looks pretty promising. It's probably not the magic bullet I was hoping for, but it's making some concrete difference. The way things look now, I am simply going to have to put together a patchwork of approaches to at least minimizing my sinus problems.
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Old 12-31-2016, 04:24 PM
 
15,189 posts, read 31,132,279 times
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I have symptoms of this. I just always have chronic sinus problems, stuffiness, etc. Back in the 1980s there was a wonderful herbal product called HAS, I think it may have been a Dr.Christopher brand, and it contained pseudoephedrine. They don't make that formula anymore (illegal?) but it worked WONDERS for me in small amounts. I guess I could try Sudafed, but hate to go the medicine route.
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