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Old 02-19-2013, 09:52 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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There was a kid at my school called Windsor Cristobal, I assume he was Filipino. Is 'Windsor' a common first-name there, it sounds like the kind of name someone wanting to sound like a posh British aristocrat would give their child, haha.

 
Old 02-19-2013, 11:06 PM
 
Location: Macao
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
There was a kid at my school called Windsor Cristobal, I assume he was Filipino. Is 'Windsor' a common first-name there, it sounds like the kind of name someone wanting to sound like a posh British aristocrat would give their child, haha.
I notice quite a few 'English' names in the Philippines. I just did a quick search for popular Filipino baby names. This one is from 2005, but first one I came across, so I'll use it: Most Popular Filipino Baby Names

For Filipino baby boys in 2005 the top ten most popular given names were Michael, Ronald, Ryan, Joseph, Joel, Jeffrey, Marlon, Richard, Noel, and Jonathan.

For girls, it was Maricel, Michelle, Jennifer, Janice, Mary Grace, Jocelyn, Catherine, Mary Anne, Rowena and Grace.
 
Old 02-19-2013, 11:13 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
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Interesting, I would have expected more Spanish sounding names but there you go.
 
Old 02-19-2013, 11:27 PM
 
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^ No, Spanish names are old-school, like what grandparents have. The middle name is usually Spanish though because it's the mother's maiden name. So there's an American first name, usually Spanish (or indigenous) middle name, and usually Spanish (or indigenous) surname.
 
Old 02-19-2013, 11:41 PM
kyh
 
Location: Malaysia & Singapore
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I'd love to see a return of Spanish names among the new generation instead of adopting English-sounding names.
 
Old 02-20-2013, 02:03 AM
 
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^ I doubt that it will see a return very soon. There are certainly some babies who are given Spanish names. But for Filipinos who are 50 years old and below, Spanish names often sound as old school as their grandparents. Those who have Spanish names suffixed with "Jr." often choose to be called "Jun". There are also many who choose more English sounding nicknames and that is how they introduce themselves. For example, Manny Pacquiao's real name is Emmanuel, but he prefers to be called Manny.
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