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Old 07-25-2018, 06:25 PM
 
Location: Lee County, NC
2,029 posts, read 643,253 times
Reputation: 2315

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Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyRider View Post
Some of these transplants really surprised me. BMW and a bunch of others are said to be as "American" as apple pie and yet the X5 has only 15% domestic content. They are really an assembly point.
That goes both ways. The Ford Fiesta, Focus RS, Buick Encore, Chevrolet SS and Chevrolet Spark all have 15% or less domestic parts content according to Kogod's algorithm.
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Old 07-25-2018, 11:30 PM
 
6,351 posts, read 5,127,403 times
Reputation: 8517
Quote:
Originally Posted by corolla5speed View Post
What percentage of your car is made in America? The answer may surprise you. Below is a link which will show what percentage of your car was made in America. Interesting stuff this is.



Auto Index | Kogod | Business
6%. That's why it runs like a dream and never needs repairs.

Actually, buying American doesn't help Americans any more than buying foreign does. When I buy a Japanese car, the Japanese get dollars. They have to spend the dollars in the U.S. (which they rarely do) or else convert the dollars to yen, which means their bank is converting yen to dollars. The bank then lends the dollars to somebody, somewhere who wants an American product, or stock in an American company - what else would they do with dollars? That is how international trade works, despite what our politicians tell us.

If American car companies want our business, they'll have to make a better product. They make pretty good trucks, but even there the Japanese and Koreans are moving up in the world.
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Old 07-26-2018, 05:45 AM
 
Location: Metro Detroit Michigan
4,188 posts, read 1,251,274 times
Reputation: 3392
Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Siegel View Post
6%. That's why it runs like a dream and never needs repairs.

Actually, buying American doesn't help Americans any more than buying foreign does. When I buy a Japanese car, the Japanese get dollars. They have to spend the dollars in the U.S. (which they rarely do) or else convert the dollars to yen, which means their bank is converting yen to dollars. The bank then lends the dollars to somebody, somewhere who wants an American product, or stock in an American company - what else would they do with dollars? That is how international trade works, despite what our politicians tell us.

If American car companies want our business, they'll have to make a better product. They make pretty good trucks, but even there the Japanese and Koreans are moving up in the world.
The imports will never be as good as the American when it comes to pickups, even Toyota can’t come close and forget about Nissan and their is no South Korea pickup on the market they make CUV’s. The Asian automakers have been trying to play catch-up in the pickup market but they can’t even come close to selling what the American automakers sell. The F150 has been the best selling vehicle in the USA for 35 years.
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Old 07-26-2018, 06:20 AM
 
291 posts, read 155,805 times
Reputation: 254
Mazda 3: Was hoping to buy the Japanese version (assembled in Japan) which would have been 1%. Wound up with the Mexican version which was 6%.
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Old 07-26-2018, 06:48 AM
 
2,665 posts, read 2,344,967 times
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I drive a 2018, but the 2016 version... evidently 80%. Wow. I knew the car was assembled in Ohio, so it really isn't the 80% that is surprising to me but how many "assembled in America" cars are under say, 30%.
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Old 07-26-2018, 07:54 AM
 
296 posts, read 92,988 times
Reputation: 274
Default "WOW" sums it up nicely.

Quote:
Originally Posted by steveklein View Post
I drive a 2018, but the 2016 version... evidently 80%. Wow. I knew the car was assembled in Ohio, so it really isn't the 80% that is surprising to me but how many "assembled in America" cars are under say, 30%.



We live in interesting times.
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Old 07-26-2018, 08:03 AM
 
1,469 posts, read 1,608,904 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steveklein View Post
I drive a 2018, but the 2016 version... evidently 80%. Wow. I knew the car was assembled in Ohio, so it really isn't the 80% that is surprising to me but how many "assembled in America" cars are under say, 30%.
Subassemblies.

Subassemblies.

Subassemblies.

I can't emphasize that enough. It completely skews the numbers - big time - on various vehicles. Read my prior posts in this thread about it...
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Old 07-26-2018, 08:56 AM
 
Location: Metro Detroit Michigan
4,188 posts, read 1,251,274 times
Reputation: 3392
This is why the automotive business is a world business vehicles and suppliers are all over the world. GM was one of the first read this about the Cadillac Allanté and the El Dorado.


Contents
Overview Edit

The name Allanté was selected by General Motors from a list of 1,700 computer generated selections.[1] Originally designed to compete with the Mercedes-Benz SL and Jaguar XJS, the Allanté originally featured a slightly modified variant of the 4.1 L V8 used across Cadillac's model line. This was expanded to 4.5 L in 1989, and upgraded to the 4.6 L L37 Northstar in its final year, 1993.

The Allanté incorporated an international production arrangement that was similar to the early 1950s Nash-Healey two-seat sports car. The Allanté bodies were designed and manufactured in Italy by Carrozzaria Pininfarina[2] and were shipped 4,600 mi (7,400 km) to the U.S. final assembly with domestically manufactured chassis and engine.[2] Specially equipped Boeing 747s departed Turin International Airport with 56 bodies at a time,[2] arriving at Detroit's Coleman A. Young International Airport about 3 miles northeast of Cadillac's new Hamtramck Assembly plant, known as the "Allante Air Bridge".[3][4] The expensive shipping process stemmed from GM's recent closing of Fisher Body Plant #18, which had supplied Cadillac bodies since 1921. It was not the first time that Cadillac utilized Pininfarina, having farmed out body production for the 1959 Eldorado Brougham and design and coachworks for several one-offs, customs, and concept cars.
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Old 07-26-2018, 09:07 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
26,412 posts, read 62,641,511 times
Reputation: 30150
It is very complicated. I worked on a case years ago that involved a car part for Chrysler. The part was contracted for by Johnson Controls - an American Company but through their branch in Germany. The vendor was a German company. The part was designed in Germany and prototypes were made in Germany. the German company holds the patent on the part. The tooling was made in Italy and used to assemble some samples in Italy. The tooling was then shipped to a factory in Mexico where the part was made in a factory built by Americans (mostly, but with Mexican Labor), and the factory was mostly built of materials and equipment from USA, but many of the components for those materials and equipment came from overseas. The factory was mostly automated, but had some Mexican workers working under supervision of US management personnel and one German. The part was then then shipped to USA to be installed in Chrysler vehicles by American workers. The components of the part came from Germany, Japan, China, and USA. This was a tiny part - a switch. Where do you attribute the part to, let alone a whole car?
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Old 07-26-2018, 10:26 AM
 
952 posts, read 513,912 times
Reputation: 2084
Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyRider View Post
Some of these transplants really surprised me. BMW and a bunch of others are said to be as "American" as apple pie and yet the X5 has only 15% domestic content. They are really an assembly point.
It's basic economics really, it's much easier to transport parts than cars... and parts can be made in highly specialized factories producing a single part reducing production costs.
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