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Old 08-14-2015, 02:26 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, Québec
21,941 posts, read 27,343,960 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesse44 View Post
From Val d'Or.
Do they live in Val-d'Or now or are the from there and now live in Sudbury?
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Old 08-14-2015, 02:37 PM
 
Location: Colorado
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jesse44 View Post
Doubt it. Half my family is francophone. I think many of which are actually from Val d'Or, the Sudbury equivalent of Quebec. They're no different culturally from anyone else I know on my English side, other than the fact that they also speak French.
All due respect, but I don't think the people you are talking about are representative of the typical Quebecois. Your typical Quebecois knows approximately zero people from outside of Quebec, unless they are foreign immigrants, and sure isn't married into a Anglo family. Typical Quebecois people are very different from the anglicized French-Canadians. I see where you are coming from, and I respect your viewpoint, but they don't seem like good candidates for your typical Quebecois guy.

Meanwhile, the average American is a white guy in Iowa or some other Midwestern area who speaks a Germanic language and of Protestant background. He has a last name like "Smith" which may or may not be an Anglicization of "Schmidt" and has a culture that is a mix of English and German with perhaps some African-American or Hispanic influences. Something along those lines. Personally as an American, I feel closer to your typical German guy than the Quebecois from outside of Montreal. The so called "pur laine" Quebecois. Someone like Jon LaJoie isn't what I am talking about.
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Old 08-14-2015, 03:50 PM
 
Location: Gatineau, QC, Canada
3,402 posts, read 4,446,132 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Do they live in Val-d'Or now or are the from there and now live in Sudbury?
Oh sorry, I must apologize for the fact that they left Val d'Or at some point and were therefore invalidated as compelling upon immediate contact with Ontario.

Lots of people are transplanted from Quebec to the ROC. They are not all write-offs.
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Old 08-14-2015, 04:12 PM
 
2,560 posts, read 2,179,030 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hobbesdj View Post
All due respect, but I don't think the people you are talking about are representative of the typical Quebecois. Your typical Quebecois knows approximately zero people from outside of Quebec, unless they are foreign immigrants, and sure isn't married into a Anglo family. Typical Quebecois people are very different from the anglicized French-Canadians. I see where you are coming from, and I respect your viewpoint, but they don't seem like good candidates for your typical Quebecois guy.

Meanwhile, the average American is a white guy in Iowa or some other Midwestern area who speaks a Germanic language and of Protestant background. He has a last name like "Smith" which may or may not be an Anglicization of "Schmidt" and has a culture that is a mix of English and German with perhaps some African-American or Hispanic influences. Something along those lines. Personally as an American, I feel closer to your typical German guy than the Quebecois from outside of Montreal. The so called "pur laine" Quebecois. Someone like Jon LaJoie isn't what I am talking about.
Hmm, curious as to how you define the "average American"? Because that definition of "average" is very quickly changing these days, and that "average" will soon become something indistinguishable from what we currently know.

In 5 short years, by 2020, over 50% of Americans under the age of 18 will be part of a visible minority race.

And for the nation overall, by 2060, only 2 in 5 Americans will be non-Hispanic Caucasian from the English/Irish/German descent that you described. America in a few decades may well become a Latino-BLack-Asian dominated country with a white minority. Interesting times we live.
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Old 08-14-2015, 04:13 PM
 
732 posts, read 853,598 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hobbesdj View Post
I am getting tired of hearing that Quebec is pretty much the same thing as the U.S. Unfortunately, it's a widespread misconception. I suppose it's because many who go to Quebec stick around the anglophone areas of downtown Montreal. Saint-Jean-sur-Richlieu is a lot more different from Burlington than Laredo is from Mexican border towns. South Texas is filled with Mexicans and the Spanish language thanks to mass immigration.

Americans probably have more in common (beyond a superficial level) with a German than your typical outside-of-Montreal-proper Quebecois. They are a very different group of people, but most Americans and English Canadians never get a real glimpse of them due to effects of the language barrier.

The average quebecian hops in his SUV and heads into town from his suburban bungalow. He drives thru a string of strip malls followed by a swath of large retail outlets_ Costco, Walmart, office depot, ikea _ next is the supermarket where he fills his cart with goodies from Kellogg, P&G, kraft , general mills and fresh produce from Calif, Fla and Chile.

Back home he catches an episode of Walking Dead (mort vivant?) before he drives his eldest to soccer practice.


Yep totally alien, might as well be Botswana
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Old 08-14-2015, 04:22 PM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 11,137,980 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bostonkid123 View Post
Hmm, curious as to how you define the "average American"? Because that definition of "average" is very quickly changing these days, and that "average" will soon become something indistinguishable from what we currently know.

In 5 short years, by 2020, over 50% of Americans under the age of 18 will be part of a visible minority race.

And for the nation overall, by 2060, only 2 in 5 Americans will be non-Hispanic Caucasian from the English/Irish/German descent that you described. America in a few decades may well become a Latino-BLack-Asian dominated country with a white minority. Interesting times we live.
So will the U.S become a client state of Latin America, Africa and Asia

Its the same thing with these blanket comments about Canada being 'Anglo' - the largest urban area in the country by a looong looong way is the GTA - in 15 years the GTA will be 67 percent 'visible minority' with plenty of recent arrivals from Asia, Africa and South America (2.2 million in the GTA will be from India/Sri Lanka/Bangladesh and Pakistan alone) and many will not speak English at home - so at that point the only minority will be the 'anglo' in Canada's largest urban area.. Vancouver will also be decidedly more Asian than white.. I think 43 percent of Vancouver right now is Asian. Ask these people where their biggest cultural influences come from..

Even as an Anglo, the sheer size of the various cultures that surround me influence every aspect of my life every day of it, where I shop, what I eat, who I socialize with, who I marry etc etc - they are as much if not more an influence on this white guy as Jurassic World or Honey Boo Boo.

Last edited by fusion2; 08-14-2015 at 04:49 PM..
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Old 08-14-2015, 04:56 PM
 
Location: Toronto
12,581 posts, read 11,137,980 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jambo101 View Post
To add/
There certainly appears to be a certain type of poster that delights in denigrating Canada whether its the oot and aboot crap or saying we arent a real country, we worship the Queen or we are nothing more than America lite and on it goes blah blah blah, meaningless drivel IMO

Client State being just another play on semantics in an effort to marginalize Canada,
Is Canada a client state?

Client state IMO is no more than a way of pointing out the obvious.
Does our country of 35 million border the worlds largest super power home to 330 million Americans? why yes it does,
do we derive benefits from this large super power economically,militarily culturally? we most certainly do.
Is America our neighbor and close ally? certainly is.
Are we a client state? of course we are and darn proud of it.
In red - totally meaningless drivel - I agree.

As for the rest - yes in geopolitics, client state status, sphere of influence - whatever you call it Canada and many other nations are influenced by the U.S.. On the flip, the U.S isn't an island unto itself - it is also influenced and shaped by the outside world including l'il ole Canada.. Its called living in a globalized world and more and more as technology and transportation bring us all closer together we are becoming clients of one another in an every increasing way.
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Old 08-14-2015, 05:11 PM
 
Location: Colorado
1,524 posts, read 2,262,997 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bostonkid123 View Post
Hmm, curious as to how you define the "average American"? Because that definition of "average" is very quickly changing these days, and that "average" will soon become something indistinguishable from what we currently know.

In 5 short years, by 2020, over 50% of Americans under the age of 18 will be part of a visible minority race.

And for the nation overall, by 2060, only 2 in 5 Americans will be non-Hispanic Caucasian from the English/Irish/German descent that you described. America in a few decades may well become a Latino-BLack-Asian dominated country with a white minority. Interesting times we live.
We are in 2015, not 2060.

Also, it might be tempting to lump people together based on racial appearance, but in reality racial appearance does not equate to culture. Take African-Americans, who speak a Germanic language, follow the traditional religions of northern Europe and culturally have very little in common with Africans. For example, pronouncing words like "ask" as "ax" and eating food like chitlins are considered traditional staples black culture, yet they both come from the English lower classes. It would be tough to argue that just because of racial appearance that the typical black American has more in common with a Congolese tribesman than the Englishman residing in Birmingham. The people you term "visible minorities" are mostly if not entirely American in culture, and those that aren't are mostly on the way to assimilation. It's not much different than how the brown guy of a various mixture in Colombia is considered Hispanic and/or Latin, despite lacking a purely Spanish bloodline or having any significant connection to Latium.

Perhaps we should take into account the culture of these "visible minorities" instead of classifying them based on skin color and facial features.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jonsereed View Post
The average quebecian hops in his SUV and heads into town from his suburban bungalow. He drives thru a string of strip malls followed by a swath of large retail outlets_ Costco, Walmart, office depot, ikea _ next is the supermarket where he fills his cart with goodies from Kellogg, P&G, kraft , general mills and fresh produce from Calif, Fla and Chile.

Back home he catches an episode of Walking Dead (mort vivant?) before he drives his eldest to soccer practice.

Yep totally alien, might as well be Botswana
Those are all superficial things, yet nonetheless the experience of this fellow remarkably resembles the experiences typically found in any western country.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fusion2 View Post
So will the U.S become a client state of Latin America, Africa and Asia

Its the same thing with these blanket comments about Canada being 'Anglo' - the largest urban area in the country by a looong looong way is the GTA - in 15 years the GTA will be 67 percent 'visible minority' with plenty of recent arrivals from Asia, Africa and South America (2.2 million in the GTA will be from India/Sri Lanka/Bangladesh and Pakistan alone) and many will not speak English at home - so at that point the only minority will be the 'anglo' in Canada's largest urban area.. Vancouver will also be decidedly more Asian than white.. I think 43 percent of Vancouver right now is Asian. Ask these people where their biggest cultural influences come from..

Even as an Anglo, the sheer size of the various cultures that surround me influence every aspect of my life every day of it, where I shop, what I eat, who I socialize with, who I marry etc etc - they are as much if not more an influence on this white guy as Jurassic World or Honey Boo Boo.
An interesting viewpoint that harks back to the late 19th century, though I contend once again that racial appearance does not equal culture or nationality. Most brown guys in Ontario are Canadian since their culture is often indistinguishable from their neighbors.
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Old 08-14-2015, 05:34 PM
 
34,374 posts, read 41,463,803 times
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Can Quebec also be considered a client state to not only America but also to Canada?.




Last edited by jambo101; 08-14-2015 at 05:45 PM..
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Old 08-14-2015, 06:19 PM
 
Location: Denmark
74 posts, read 57,668 times
Reputation: 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by babyblue1987 View Post
I would call Canada a satellite state, which is a form of client state. We are completely dependent on the US economically, culturally and militarily, so does this make us a defacto "satellite"? I think we are as independent as we have ever been under US tutelage, but still fall short of having true autonomy due to our geographic position, small population and also the choice of a big chunk of the population to replace our original culture with American culture.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Client_state

I think according to the definition of a client state we certainly fit the bill.
Absolutely. Canada's position as an American pawn is the root of Canada's only identify being a "not American". Canada is an American pawn if there ever was one. IMHO. They are a bit like children. Canadians unknowingly enjoy their place, while the Americans handle the grown up affairs for them.
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