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Old 04-12-2016, 08:15 PM
 
Location: Portland, OR
9,594 posts, read 9,423,079 times
Reputation: 9198

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What did we do before the internet. Yikes. I would say that rather than constrain kitty because of the possibility of illnesses picked up outside, it would be better to investigate what vaccines or medications are available to treat the most likely ailments. Thankfully, mosquitoes do not seem to be an issue in Oregon. One of our cats (now deceased) had no interest in going outdoors. Our other cat cannot be kept inside especially in summer. So we invest in high end once a month flea treatment and keep his vaccines up to date. We lived for a short while in a complex where cats were not allowed to roam, and he was one miserable cat (so were we). Now we live where he can go and come as long as there is someone to let him out (and back in).
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Old 04-13-2016, 10:24 AM
 
758 posts, read 701,348 times
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I heard that kind of treatment is hard on kitties and can cause a bunch of bad side effects :-(
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Old 04-13-2016, 11:48 AM
 
6,307 posts, read 7,129,660 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leisesturm View Post
Our other cat cannot be kept inside especially in summer. So we invest in high end once a month flea treatment and keep his vaccines up to date. We lived for a short while in a complex where cats were not allowed to roam, and he was one miserable cat (so were we). Now we live where he can go and come as long as there is someone to let him out (and back in).
So, no coyotes, birds of prey, other cats, dogs or cars in Oregon?

At least with the advent of the internet, people don't have the option to say "heck, I didn't know that this was an issue" when something bad happens to the animal that they let out to fend for itself.
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Old 04-14-2016, 03:45 PM
 
Location: Portland, OR
9,594 posts, read 9,423,079 times
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I know you all mean well, but... he is a cat. Going out makes him happy. We've had him since he was four and now he is twelve. I think he knows how to keep from getting smished by cars. A couple of years ago he got in a fight with something so we don't let him stay out all night anymore, but I suspect he gave as good as he got.

Both his mother and I would love it if someone would feed us and keep us safe and forbid us from ever going outside too, but alas, we have to risk cars, coyotes and worse to bring home the money for the cat food and cat litter and cat scratchers and once a month flea treatment. If we have to go out there then he can too. Kidding. Kind of.

You aren't the only ones that are horrified that Ernest goes out, and we would be sad if anything happened to him as a result but for one thing my SO is blind and he is an escape artist par excellence. I can keep him inside if I need to for some reason (vet appointment) but he gives her the slip everytime. It is clear that it is more trouble than it is worth trying to make a total indoor cat out of him. Don't jinx my kitty. Send all the positive energy you can to north east Portland, OR. Please, and thank you.
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Old 04-14-2016, 04:51 PM
 
Location: Denver, CO
3,846 posts, read 6,599,566 times
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My cat also loves to be on the patio, i dont worry about predators but i worry about her falling. I have started to train her on a harness with a leash. She doesnt like it but i feel much safer with her wearing it. I might get her one of those pop up cat tents to put out there.
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Old 04-14-2016, 07:10 PM
 
5,875 posts, read 11,740,839 times
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I just wrapped plastic deer fence around to cat proof my second story porch. They love it!
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Is it safe to let a cat sit on a patio?-three-1.jpg   Is it safe to let a cat sit on a patio?-three-2.jpg   Is it safe to let a cat sit on a patio?-one.jpg  
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Old 04-17-2016, 08:08 AM
 
Location: Near Nashville TN
7,201 posts, read 11,323,049 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Flavia84 View Post
I think she is pretty safe with the amount of chicken wire but I'll add more to the top.

What about mosquitoes and heartworm, is it a concern?
They could be but HW is rare in cats. You can always use window screen over the chickenwire. We have a catio and covered it with window screening bought at Lowes. Mosquitoes by nature fly closer to the ground looking for prey.
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Old 04-17-2016, 10:01 AM
Status: "I'm late because I don't want to be here." (set 1 day ago)
 
986 posts, read 539,796 times
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Please don.t medicate your cat. You live in Minneapolis. Supervise her and rig up a leash that will not allow kitty to get to the corners of the patio due to hanging.
Those meds are very hard on their kidneys and liver and cats may have a systematic reaction that requires an emergency vet trip.
Cats instinctively love to climb and investigate and she can climb that chicken wire with no problem. Maybe only do it occasionally as what you do everyday they become accustomed to and demand it.
Curiosity kills cats: remember the old saying?
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Old 04-17-2016, 10:26 AM
 
5,263 posts, read 2,874,948 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Leisesturm View Post
I know you all mean well, but... he is a cat. Going out makes him happy. We've had him since he was four and now he is twelve. I think he knows how to keep from getting smished by cars. A couple of years ago he got in a fight with something so we don't let him stay out all night anymore, but I suspect he gave as good as he got.

Both his mother and I would love it if someone would feed us and keep us safe and forbid us from ever going outside too, but alas, we have to risk cars, coyotes and worse to bring home the money for the cat food and cat litter and cat scratchers and once a month flea treatment. If we have to go out there then he can too. Kidding. Kind of.

You aren't the only ones that are horrified that Ernest goes out, and we would be sad if anything happened to him as a result but for one thing my SO is blind and he is an escape artist par excellence. I can keep him inside if I need to for some reason (vet appointment) but he gives her the slip everytime. It is clear that it is more trouble than it is worth trying to make a total indoor cat out of him. Don't jinx my kitty. Send all the positive energy you can to north east Portland, OR. Please, and thank you.

I know what you mean! Eighteen years ago, my family and I adopted a beautiful cat from the humane society. I brought him home and said, "Well, you're going to enjoy being in the house where it's safe!" And then, about four days after we brought him home, he slipped out of the house when we weren't looking. I was heartbroken. I thought he was gone forever. I felt like I failed him and didn't live up to my promise to the humane society. We put food and water and shelter out for him and five days later, he was meowing outside the window, asking to be let back in, thankfully. BUT, he was never an "indoor" cat like I had intended. He just wouldn't even hear of such a thing. He just liked to do things on his own terms, the stubborn coot.

I just lost my boy two weeks ago. He lived to a pretty ripe old age... we think he must have been almost 19 years old. The vet said that he must have been a very happy cat and I told her it was because we allowed him to be an "outdoorsman." We had no other choice. If we'd have kept him confined, he would have been absolutely the most miserable cat, ever. I got a tracking collar for him, so I could always find him. We kept an eye on him, brought him in the house every evening (he wanted to come in then to chow down and snuggle) but otherwise, he'd sit on a chair on our patio or roam around the garage. I had friends who would gasp and say, "You let your cat OUTSIDE?! But, but, but..." and I'd say that what was fine and dandy for them was not fine and dandy for us. Kept the cat alive for over 18 years. I loved that cat more than words can say. I'm heartbroken once again due to the loss of him, but I'd do it all over again.

Sending all positive energy to your outdoorsy kitty.

Two cats are living on my patio right this minute. I tamed a feral one and the other is a stray that someone dumped off. Neither one will venture into the house at this point, even though I've invited them in. I simply built shelters for them and ALL they do is sit on the patio, sleep on the patio, eat on the patio. I've never seen two homebodies like these two. Maybe they're relieved to finally have someone to take care of them. I swore I wouldn't have another cat after losing mine a couple of weeks ago, but maybe the universe has other ideas.
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Old 04-18-2016, 08:44 PM
 
867 posts, read 2,697,558 times
Reputation: 944
Hawks can only carry about 1.5 times their body weight, or up to 3 pounds for a very large hawk. Hawks don't want to eat on the ground, they snatch their prey and then carry it to high, open perch where they can guard their dinner. They can take a kitten, but won't go after a full sized cat. The largest prey red tailed hawks pursue are squirrels and seagulls and even then, sometimes their eyes are bigger than their stomachs and they cannot carry them away. Eagles can carry more weight, but they prefer fishing and hunt in open area's. I'd be only slightly concerned about small dogs and cats along river banks were eagles are actively fishing.

Coyote's "shouldn't" be a problem on a 2nd floor patios, though the wily ones have been known to employ elevators...

The biggest issue with balcony cats is falling. There are all sorts of myths about this, but the reality is, in urban areas, that house cats die or are severely injured by falling off of balconies more often than you might think.
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