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Old 12-13-2010, 06:13 PM
 
6 posts, read 13,360 times
Reputation: 12

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Can anyone provide information pertaining to the housing for African Americans of West End Cincinnati.

(1) Was it only housing projects in which they lived?

(2) Neighborhood Barbara Shops?

(3) Nightclubs?


Any answers to the above questions would be greatly appreciated. Writing a story.
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Old 12-15-2010, 10:56 AM
 
Location: Indianapolis and Cincinnati
657 posts, read 934,040 times
Reputation: 504
African Americans didnt always live in "projects". There used to be a neighborhood in the West End called Kenyon Barr, it was mostly middle class neighborhood that had been a properous White and German neighborhood. By the 1950's it was almost entirely working and middle class black and the city didnt want "those people' so close to the city center and business districts. They systematcally condemned property then received millions of federal dollars to in the best Urban renewal tradition "redevelop it"

The city decided the 'clear out' the neighborhood for the project now known as Queensgate Industrial, 25000 Blacks were displaced out of the neighborhood almost overnight. Many, who were renters, left carrying all their possesions in wheelbarrows.

Most wound up in Avondale, what was left of West End and OTR. They wre promised they would be brouught back when new houseing projects were built but maybe 10 percent came back. We saw those people in OTR displaced again after the 2001 riots.

Much as today, city officials lied and made pronmises they had no intention of keeping. Were Kenyon-Barr standing today it would have been the oldest historic district in the city. Many homes were federal, dating to the 1840's and were as architecturally grand as OTR and Dayton street

The Cincy Historical society has a great collection of photos showing a vibrant neighorhood that once was online.

It was one of the most brazen and shamefull examples of "urban renewal" in the United States.
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Old 12-15-2010, 08:32 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
577 posts, read 625,959 times
Reputation: 229
Are you talking about Laurel Homes and Lincoln Court. Laurel Homes was built around 1936 by the Cincinnati Metropolitan Housing Authority. It was the second largest public housing project and was funded through the WPA. It was once 16 blocks and only about a block of the original buildings is still standing (at the corner of Linn and Liberty).

City of Cincinnati - Laurel Homes Historic District (http://www.ci.cincinnati.oh.us/cdap/pages/-6748-/ - broken link)

Lincoln Court was on the other side of Ezzard Charles. It was where City West now stands. Here is a great article about it:

Cincinnati Magazine - Google Books
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Old 12-17-2010, 10:54 AM
 
6 posts, read 13,360 times
Reputation: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by restorationconsultant View Post
African Americans didnt always live in "projects". There used to be a neighborhood in the West End called Kenyon Barr, it was mostly middle class neighborhood that had been a properous White and German neighborhood. By the 1950's it was almost entirely working and middle class black and the city didnt want "those people' so close to the city center and business districts. They systematcally condemned property then received millions of federal dollars to in the best Urban renewal tradition "redevelop it"

The city decided the 'clear out' the neighborhood for the project now known as Queensgate Industrial, 25000 Blacks were displaced out of the neighborhood almost overnight. Many, who were renters, left carrying all their possesions in wheelbarrows.

Most wound up in Avondale, what was left of West End and OTR. They wre promised they would be brouught back when new houseing projects were built but maybe 10 percent came back. We saw those people in OTR displaced again after the 2001 riots.

Much as today, city officials lied and made pronmises they had no intention of keeping. Were Kenyon-Barr standing today it would have been the oldest historic district in the city. Many homes were federal, dating to the 1840's and were as architecturally grand as OTR and Dayton street

The Cincy Historical society has a great collection of photos showing a vibrant neighorhood that once was online.

It was one of the most brazen and shamefull examples of "urban renewal" in the United States.

Thanks for the info.
Greatly appreciated!
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Old 12-17-2010, 11:00 AM
 
6 posts, read 13,360 times
Reputation: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by deg1114 View Post
Are you talking about Laurel Homes and Lincoln Court. Laurel Homes was built around 1936 by the Cincinnati Metropolitan Housing Authority. It was the second largest public housing project and was funded through the WPA. It was once 16 blocks and only about a block of the original buildings is still standing (at the corner of Linn and Liberty).

City of Cincinnati - Laurel Homes Historic District (http://www.ci.cincinnati.oh.us/cdap/pages/-6748-/ - broken link)

Lincoln Court was on the other side of Ezzard Charles. It was where City West now stands. Here is a great article about it:

Cincinnati Magazine - Google Books

Thanks for responding!
This info. helps as well.
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Old 12-21-2010, 09:06 PM
 
Location: Indianapolis and Cincinnati
657 posts, read 934,040 times
Reputation: 504
Not too long ago (november) I did a blogpost about Kenyon Barr on my Preservation blog. you might find it interesting.

Victorian Antiquities and Design: Cincinnati's Lost Neigborhood: Kenyon-Barr, The greatest "Architectural Rape" in city history!
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Old 12-21-2010, 09:27 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati
577 posts, read 625,959 times
Reputation: 229
Quote:
Originally Posted by restorationconsultant View Post
Not too long ago (november) I did a blogpost about Kenyon Barr on my Preservation blog. you might find it interesting.

Victorian Antiquities and Design: Cincinnati's Lost Neigborhood: Kenyon-Barr, The greatest "Architectural Rape" in city history!
That's your blog? Love it! House is coming along nicely too.
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Old 12-25-2010, 08:59 PM
 
1,913 posts, read 1,482,960 times
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Dont forget the west end housing )semi-slums) that were demolished for I-75. John St, Linn St, etc
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Old 01-03-2011, 11:53 AM
 
6 posts, read 13,360 times
Reputation: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by restorationconsultant View Post
Not too long ago (november) I did a blogpost about Kenyon Barr on my Preservation blog. you might find it interesting.

Victorian Antiquities and Design: Cincinnati's Lost Neigborhood: Kenyon-Barr, The greatest "Architectural Rape" in city history!

Thanks!
Daood!
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Old 01-03-2011, 12:16 PM
 
6 posts, read 13,360 times
Reputation: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by mike1003 View Post
Dont forget the west end housing )semi-slums) that were demolished for I-75. John St, Linn St, etc
Thank you also for takiing the time out to respond!


Happy New Year everyone!
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