U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina > Coastal North Carolina
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 09-26-2011, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Morehead City, NC
1,676 posts, read 5,361,785 times
Reputation: 1245

Advertisements

"The bridge is now approaching its 16th year of duty beyond its initially projected retirement date back in 1993. In 1997, the state Department of Transportation estimated that the useful life of the bridge was only seven more years. That deadline came and went in 2004 with no definitive action on a replacement"

"According to NCDOT (Raleigh Office), an average 5,100 vehicles crossed the Oregon Inlet Bridge daily in 2006."

replacethebridgenow.com

Can a ferry system handle an average of 5,000 vehicles a day? (Up to 10,000 vehicles a day during peak season.)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-26-2011, 04:20 PM
 
20 posts, read 41,492 times
Reputation: 15
Default No advocacy; just data…

Washington State Ferries operates the most extensive ferry system in the United States, with ten routes on Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca serving terminals in Washington and Vancouver Island. In fiscal year 1999, Washington State Ferries carried 11 million vehicles and 26 million passengers.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-27-2011, 04:59 AM
 
Location: Morehead City, NC
1,676 posts, read 5,361,785 times
Reputation: 1245
"The department also required that the teams add special mineral and chemical mixtures to the concrete used to build the bridge to increase its durability. With these factors, NCDOT expects the new bridge to last more than 100 years."

NCDOT: Bonner Bridge

Be careful of an agenda. Facts mean nothing unless it supports the cause. Be careful of an inflated ego often displayed as intellect. It must always be considered correct and will do whatever it must do to be thought of as correct. Combine ego and agenda and you have something very, very dangerous.

Whether its this bridge, inlet, turtles, gill nets whatever-I highly encourage anyone concerned about an issue to get the facts. Not just news stories or Google searches. And at all times-Consider the source.

Last edited by Bill Hitchcock; 09-27-2011 at 06:27 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-27-2011, 06:34 AM
 
Location: Morehead City, NC
1,676 posts, read 5,361,785 times
Reputation: 1245
Another interesting fact. The Oregon Inlet bridge handles 1.8 million vehicles a year. The entire NC Ferry system with its 21 ferries and 400 workers only transports 1.1 million vehicles.
NCDOT: Ferry Division
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-27-2011, 02:57 PM
 
Location: Winston-Salem
700 posts, read 1,438,438 times
Reputation: 310
Default Let's see????

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Hitchcock View Post

Can a ferry system handle an average of 5,000 vehicles a day? (Up to 10,000 vehicles a day during peak season.)
The Staten Island Ferry provides 20 million people a year (60,000 passengers a day not including weekend days) with ferry service between St. George on Staten Island and Whitehall Street in lower Manhattan.A typical weekday schedule involves the use of five boats to transport approximately 60,000 passengers daily (109 daily trips). During the day, between rush hours, boats are regularly fueled and maintenance work is performed. Terminals are cleaned around the clock and routine terminal maintenance is performed on the day shift. On weekends, three boats are used (75 trips each Saturday and 68 trips each Sunday). Over 35,000 trips are made annually.

Now understand this is New York. I think that if they can handle this volume. The state could surely find a system that can handle that load. Note: Most of the ferries have been in service for decades. Making the cost long term worth the investment.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-27-2011, 03:15 PM
 
Location: Winston-Salem
700 posts, read 1,438,438 times
Reputation: 310
The fact is estimates are that. 100 years. Sure. Let me know what the yearly cost of maintaining this system will be. Does "IT" the bridge produce revenue directly. Is it self supporting? The answer is no. A ferry system properly designed can and will produce revenue to be self maintained. New bridge 215.??? some million to build. Then maintaining cost as it ages. Hey 15 million just to get the one we have to last a few more years. How much has it cost to maintain over the years??? A ferry system is the answer. There are examples in other countries and here is the US. It takes people willing to accept change and not the same old thing. Just like turtles, gill nets and the like. Accepting what is fact is hard. You can if you are willing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-28-2011, 05:20 PM
 
20 posts, read 41,492 times
Reputation: 15
Default Free-hanging pilings don't provide support

[quote=Bill Hitchcock;21050098]"...the new bridge to last more than 100 years."

Between 1846 and 1989, Oregon Inlet migrated approximately 2 miles south of its original location. In 1962-1963 the Oregon Inlet Bridge was built, but the inlet continued to migrate causing the throat channel to migrate from under the fixed navigation span and Pea Island to be almost severed from the bridge. Consequently, inlet dredging was increased to preserve the navigation channel; a rock jetty was emplaced on the south bank in 1989-1991, and a rock revetment was emplaced around the south base of the bridge to prevent further migration. However, the constrained location of the south bank, and the continued southward spit growth on the north bank caused Oregon Inlet to narrow and deepen. The narrower throat channel resulted in rapid scour beneath the central bridge pilings. As a result, rocks were emplaced beneath the free-hanging pilings.

It has been well understood for decades by coastal scientists that placement of rock jetties generally starve the littoral drift of sand to the south resulting in narrowing and shifting westward of the southern barrier island and this effect may continue for up to 10 miles. Is this a possible contributor to the breakthrough on Pea Island?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-30-2011, 01:59 PM
 
37,061 posts, read 16,156,669 times
Reputation: 8437
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill Hitchcock View Post
"The department also required that the teams add special mineral and chemical mixtures to the concrete used to build the bridge to increase its durability. With these factors, NCDOT expects the new bridge to last more than 100 years."

NCDOT: Bonner Bridge

Be careful of an agenda. Facts mean nothing unless it supports the cause. Be careful of an inflated ego often displayed as intellect. It must always be considered correct and will do whatever it must do to be thought of as correct. Combine ego and agenda and you have something very, very dangerous.

Whether its this bridge, inlet, turtles, gill nets whatever-I highly encourage anyone concerned about an issue to get the facts. Not just news stories or Google searches. And at all times-Consider the source.
Has storms been taken into account in the 100 year projection?

I have NEVER seen a gov't prediction come true.

When the road keeps washing out due to storms is it financial responsible to keep paying out millions, probably billions, over the years, for road and bridge repair?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:



Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina > Coastal North Carolina
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top