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Old 01-02-2012, 11:07 AM
 
43,012 posts, read 92,025,684 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stan4 View Post
I think the idea of putting my dog down for incontinence is simply cruel and awful.
There are so many other avenues to explore first.
I agree! The only way this dog is being PTS is if he is in terrible pain or becomes permanently paralyzed. I carried him for a few weeks when he was last paralyzed. Sure, they're embarrased and horrified at their accidents, but owners can help them transition by not making a big deal about it and reassuring them it's okay. I've read that elderly dogs stop being ashamed when their owners help them overcome it. I just couldn't put him to sleep for this. I certainly wouldn't want someone to put me to sleep for this when I'm old.
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Old 01-02-2012, 11:17 AM
 
43,012 posts, read 92,025,684 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DandJ View Post
Oh, Hopes, big hugs to you. I'm sorry to hear that you're going through this crappy stuff (every pun intended, just to make you smile).

I think that you got a couple of responses from people who don't know you, who don't know how much you adore your dogs. I'm sorry... that must have made you feel worse about the situation.

I'm glad that you seem to have gotten to the bottom of it (OK, I didn't even plan on that pun!!!!) and that you're feeling like you're on steadier ground with this whole thing.

More big hugs to you. I hope you and your old lovey have a wonderful 2012 together.
You're just so witty it happens naturally! Thanks for the kind wishes!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Amazonchix View Post
Hopes, thanks for sharing your experience and your love. Two of our large breed mixes are 7 y/o and I would love for them to see 17 y/o! I like to read what people on CD share so that I can be a better dog parent through others experiences. I worry about our gang's senior years and what they may bring, but I have to quickly shut those thoughts down and focus on the now. Continue giving that lucky baby all that spoiled love!
Oh, I hope your big dogs live long healthy lives too!

One of the best things we did was get his weight down. He's a big lab, bigger than most. He's very tall and very long. He looks like a small deer. In his first years of adulthood, he weighed over 110lbs and he wasn't even fat. But we knew we had to get that weight off his frame. By 3 or 4 years old, we got him down to around 80lbs. He stayed there until he got older and naturally lost weight do to wasting. He's probably 65 to 70 now. If he weighed more, he wouldn't have been with us this long because he would have been paralyzed younger and permanently.

I wish we could get our beagle basset's weight down. He came here looking like a pot belly pig. But it's mostly because he's all basset chest. He doesn't eat too much. He's just dense, sturdy, stalky. He has always been stronger than the huge lab. I think he has that low center of gravity working for him!
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Old 01-02-2012, 12:31 PM
 
Location: Canada
5,677 posts, read 6,509,120 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hopes View Post
I agree! The only way this dog is being PTS is if he is in terrible pain or becomes permanently paralyzed. I carried him for a few weeks when he was last paralyzed. Sure, they're embarrased and horrified at their accidents, but owners can help them transition by not making a big deal about it and reassuring them it's okay. I've read that elderly dogs stop being ashamed when their owners help them overcome it. I just couldn't put him to sleep for this. I certainly wouldn't want someone to put me to sleep for this when I'm old.
They do overcome it. I've had elderly dogs before that I carried around to do their business an at first they felt panic. I think that is because in nature only the fittest survive, and they expect to be abandoned. Once they realised they were still part of my pack - that they would be fed - by hand, if necessary - and that to the very best of my ability I would provide for their needs, they relaxed. It was very touching and humbling to witness.

My last senior dog who never was a trusting type and had only 3 legs, would, in her last days, come around the corner from her bed, and give me the sharpest, happiest "woof" you can imagine at least half a dozen times a day. She would wait for me to "woof" back at her, and then she would go and lie back down.

I am totally convinced she was checking on me because she couldn't quite believe her own senses that she was still loved, still part of the family, and her "woof" was like a "hey, dude!" And I would "hey, dude!" her right back.

I now have a 15-year-old beagle as my most senior dog. I carry her up and down stairs too, but other than that, she can walk.
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Old 01-02-2012, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
13,842 posts, read 25,226,802 times
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Rimadyl is a controversial medication because it's not good for the liver if it's used long term. But I would give it a try because it can sure improve the life of an older dog.

It's an analgesic anti inflammatory that can help with the spinal/rear end pain and loss of strength in the rear end. The muscles deteriorate because it hurts your pet to use those muscles. I have used this medication twice and after less than a week, it made a huge difference. Both my dogs moved much easier and regained a lot of their zest for life. Took care of a lot of the pooping issues too.

Another thing you can do is make it easier for them to poop by making their poop softer. I do this by giving the dog a can of green beans mixed with their regular food every day. It's cheap and it won't hurt them to add some veggies to their diet. They also think they are getting a lot more food and that makes them happy too!
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Old 01-02-2012, 01:10 PM
 
43,012 posts, read 92,025,684 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by netwit View Post
They do overcome it. I've had elderly dogs before that I carried around to do their business an at first they felt panic. I think that is because in nature only the fittest survive, and they expect to be abandoned. Once they realised they were still part of my pack - that they would be fed - by hand, if necessary - and that to the very best of my ability I would provide for their needs, they relaxed. It was very touching and humbling to witness.

My last senior dog who never was a trusting type and had only 3 legs, would, in her last days, come around the corner from her bed, and give me the sharpest, happiest "woof" you can imagine at least half a dozen times a day. She would wait for me to "woof" back at her, and then she would go and lie back down.

I am totally convinced she was checking on me because she couldn't quite believe her own senses that she was still loved, still part of the family, and her "woof" was like a "hey, dude!" And I would "hey, dude!" her right back.

I now have a 15-year-old beagle as my most senior dog. I carry her up and down stairs too, but other than that, she can walk.
That's so sweet. The lab is always checking on us too. He likes knowing where we are. When hubby is taking a nap, he goes in there and checks on hubby regularly. Since he's no so dependent on us, he likes routines when we are home. If we're doing anything out of the ordinary, he starts following us around. He likes us in our places, doing certain things at certain times of the day. God forbid if I start organizing drawers. He thinks we're packing for a trip!

That first time I picked my lab up in the yard, he didn't fight it. He was so relieved I was there to help him. I've always been the one to save him. When he was a year old, we had him in the woods with my husband's brothers one winter. He jumped into water and his collar got stuck on a branch of a log. He start to panic. I was surrounded by 4 big men who didn't make a move. I jumped into the freezing cold water to save him. Then I had to hear the guys say "he would have been okay. You're going to get hypothermia." And of course, I would have gotten hypothermia if we didn't get me inside and out of my wet clothes. Ever since then, he has always come running to me whenever he has a problem. And he's not even "my" dog. He adores and only has eyes for hubby. LOL

To make a long story short, the first time I picked him up in the yard, the beagle basset looked SHOCKED and came running to help. He was so concerned. He had never seen such a thing. Since he's smaller, I have picked him up on occassion and he always fought it, legs flying everywhere. After seeing me carry the labrador, he doesn't fight me picking him up anymore. It's like he feels special too!
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Old 01-02-2012, 01:18 PM
 
43,012 posts, read 92,025,684 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
Rimadyl is a controversial medication because it's not good for the liver if it's used long term. But I would give it a try because it can sure improve the life of an older dog.

It's an analgesic anti inflammatory that can help with the spinal/rear end pain and loss of strength in the rear end. The muscles deteriorate because it hurts your pet to use those muscles. I have used this medication twice and after less than a week, it made a huge difference. Both my dogs moved much easier and regained a lot of their zest for life. Took care of a lot of the pooping issues too.
Since we're at the end of life, we'd definitely try it for quality of life. He's on Demarexx and it has similar risks. He has to have blood work done twice a year. I think it's silly to require the blood tests in an older dog. He's going to die one way or another. The medicine is just to give him quality of life so he can live longer. If he didn't take Demerexx, he would have been put to sleep a year ago. If Demorexx causes liver failure, he'll be put to sleep but he lives an extra year longer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowsnow View Post
Another thing you can do is make it easier for them to poop by making their poop softer. I do this by giving the dog a can of green beans mixed with their regular food every day. It's cheap and it won't hurt them to add some veggies to their diet. They also think they are getting a lot more food and that makes them happy too!
I'm nervous about that but I might try it. The last thing I need is diarrhea. Maybe if I slowly add a vegetable, the diet transition will be "uneventful."
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Old 01-02-2012, 01:30 PM
 
1,004 posts, read 2,026,877 times
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I find this thread very interesting. My current dog although not quite as old is getting up there in age and I often wonder what to expect. Its nice to read everyone's experience on the matter.
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Old 01-02-2012, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
13,842 posts, read 25,226,802 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hopes View Post
Since we're at the end of life, we'd definitely try it for quality of life. He's on Demarexx and it has similar risks. He has to have blood work done twice a year. I think it's silly to require the blood tests in an older dog. He's going to die one way or another. The medicine is just to give him quality of life so he can live longer. If he didn't take Demerexx, he would have been put to sleep a year ago. If Demorexx causes liver failure, he'll be put to sleep but he lives an extra year longer.


I'm nervous about that but I might try it. The last thing I need is diarrhea. Maybe if I slowly add a vegetable, the diet transition will be "uneventful."
Agreed! Start with half a can!
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Old 01-02-2012, 03:32 PM
 
13,773 posts, read 33,834,780 times
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Folks please remember our opinions on a location or issue are just that, opinions. Highly subjective. Personal preferences. Quirks, even. Leave wiggle room for dialogue, others may not see things the same as you, or been there as long as you, and any one of us can be wrong.
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Old 12-27-2012, 08:39 PM
 
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My 12yr old Lab/New Foundland Mix is still alive and kicking--consider a giant breed by my vet was having this problem --"squatting" and poop just coming out at will. The problem in his case is weak hind quarters--hips and knees as well as a weak spine with spurs also arthritis Swim therapy has extended his life beyond his 7-9yr life span and he is happy and thriving. Dogs need exercise, period. He was walked 3miles per day up until he was 10, then swimming had to come in to play. He now gets a monthly steroid (NOT cortosteroid) with vitamin B & other nutrients monthly and cold laser therapy on his spine and hips/knees. Alert though: cold laser is not to be used on dogs whom have been diagnosed with cancer--the therapy will bring circulation to a tumor or cancerous cells accelerating the disease. See caninesincrisis website for diets for dogs with arthritis.
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