U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Pets > Dogs
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-08-2008, 09:30 AM
miu
 
Location: MA/NH
17,149 posts, read 34,648,266 times
Reputation: 16249

Advertisements

We got a lot of good tips from watching Cesar Milan's show. Our problem dog is a senior mini poodle/rat terrier mix that we adopted four years ago, along with two other dogs. The poodle is very attached to me and shadows me everywhere. He used to periodically attack and bite my boyfriend's feet. And when he did, my boyfriend would gently grab his throat and push him down on his back in a submissive posture. Eventually, the poodle accepted not being my boyfriend's equal. There is no love between them, but for the most part, there is a truce. I suppose that I should be flattered that the poodle wants to claim me for his own.

I also agree with talking regular walks with your dog NOT leading the group of you. And don't treat your dog as a small person, but just a dog in the house. This would also mean no bed or furniture privileges until order is restored. If you treat your dog like a people, they can be confused about their role in the household and that's when the trouble starts. Cesar even had an episode where he stopped a dog from barking and going crazy when people rang the doorbell. Again, while it's good to have a protective dog, that dog also needs to calm down immediately if their humans indicate the all clear sign.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-08-2008, 11:15 AM
 
Location: Hampton Roads, Virginia
1,123 posts, read 4,806,444 times
Reputation: 678
I am setting up the DVR tonight to record ALL of the Dog Whisperer shows. Also planning to take a walk with DH and Aztec tonight and will make this a routine for us.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-08-2008, 03:18 PM
miu
 
Location: MA/NH
17,149 posts, read 34,648,266 times
Reputation: 16249
I think that a well exercised dog has a better calmer energy level inside the house. Good luck!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-08-2008, 05:26 PM
 
Location: Florida
1,738 posts, read 7,512,647 times
Reputation: 665
I say walk him and then put him to bed an hour before you go to bed ....out of routine! I'm going against routine here! Routine makes our dog expect things so we keep him guessing. Its possible he's not normal though (ha)
or change up his bedtime ..move his crate, move the bed? change things around so they aren't predictable and I would make hubby become friends w/ the dog!

sidenote!
I can't fill up a water bottles w/ gym shorts on because Cody knows we are going for a walk and bounces off walls!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-08-2008, 09:33 PM
 
Location: Jax
8,204 posts, read 32,225,194 times
Reputation: 3397
Quote:
Originally Posted by stacylee926 View Post
I am setting up the DVR tonight to record ALL of the Dog Whisperer shows. Also planning to take a walk with DH and Aztec tonight and will make this a routine for us.
Sounds like a good plan .

There's definitely something psychological that happens during a walk, Cesar explains it very well .
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-13-2008, 06:47 PM
 
Location: California
423 posts, read 1,331,908 times
Reputation: 414
Great suggestions, definitely do the walking. I don't think anyone mentioned this yet, but also you could do some obedience work with the dog every day and that will help you gain status in his eyes. Doesn't have to be much, just 5-10 minutes practicing sit, down, stay, come etc. You and DH should do the obedience, maybe trade off days? And have the dog sit (or do another command) before you feed him. Make him work for food, affection, etc. Not work hard, but doing a sit or down first will reinforce that you are in control.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-15-2008, 09:28 AM
 
Location: Mostly in my head
19,823 posts, read 56,029,281 times
Reputation: 19019
Also try the NILIF technique (nothing in life is free). He wants a treat, he has to sit for it, he wants to go out, he has to sit first, he wants to eat, he has to sit first, you go through the door/up/down stairs first, etc. Dogs who work (not hard) for something understand the owner's position as pack leader.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-20-2008, 08:39 PM
 
74 posts, read 127,839 times
Reputation: 70
Quote:
Originally Posted by gizmo980 View Post
A yard, no matter how big, is not a substitute for the walk... it fulfills many needs in a dog, including "moving forward" (as they do in the wild), socializing, smelling/seeing new sights, and following their pack leader. Have you read or watched Cesar Milan, the Dog Whisperer? He talks a LOT about the importance of a walk, and how every dog needs 1-2 good ones a day. As he put it on one show, would you be happy never going out if you had a mansion? I'm guessing you'd get bored pretty quickly, even if the house was 20,000 square feet.
You took the words right out of my mouth. I was just going to say the exact same thing! Walking the dog is essential. Love Cesar Milan.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-05-2010, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Chicago,IL
3 posts, read 5,769 times
Reputation: 10
You did not mention if the dog was accustomed to sleeping with you or in your room before your ex came back. On the surface it sounds like your dog is ok with your kids but resents your ex for some reason. Aggression is normally caused by fear and it’s your dog’s way of trying to protect itself. The dog may even feel it must protect you as well. It’s important to note that your dog feels more at ease with your husband lying in bed. I would encourage your husband to interact in a positive way with your dog before retiring for the evening to instill a more desirable behavior. You should see a difference within a short period of time. However, if the problem escalates, contact a professional trainer for advice. They would be in a position to evaluate the situation and solve the issue. Aggression can be easily dealt with once you discover the source and how to stop it.

Moderator cut: no ads allowed and post was 2 yrs old

Last edited by SouthernBelleInUtah; 10-05-2010 at 10:59 AM.. Reason: addition
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Pets > Dogs
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top