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Old 06-30-2017, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
16,498 posts, read 20,049,343 times
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Until a couple more million short-sighted people in this country purchase gas hogs! That's what the oil companies are waiting for with double smiles on their faces!
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Old 06-30-2017, 10:26 AM
 
708 posts, read 448,141 times
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Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Solar is so cheap and practical that it threatened to put conventional power stations into mothballs, threatening thousands of jobs in Germany. Similarly, Arizona restricted solar development to some extent, fearing that their power companies would go belly-up, and would have no way to pay staff to maintain the facilities.
Solar is so cheap?? Perhaps if you live in the desert. If it is so cheap why is alternatives only 10% of the power in US? It is so subsidized it could never make it by its self. It will take years to get alternatives to be even 40% of the power grid. US is a very large country and people love the convenience and availability that gas gives them. You made a great example in Arizona where of any state in the Union it should work but they basically gave up on it. How will work in rest of the country especially heavily populated NE states.
I know there will be change but long as oil stays low or moderately priced it will be years before push will be made to change.
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Old 06-30-2017, 10:43 AM
 
8,301 posts, read 3,466,952 times
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Originally Posted by KerrTown View Post

But people in those geographic areas are reducing their consumption and other places are feeling the effects of oil workers staying home in lower tourism numbers (and lower spending if traveling). You can glean the multiplier effect from the casual dining industry being dragged down by their stores in those geographical areas.
I think I said that. The locally affected economies, but not necessarily the broader economy.
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Old 06-30-2017, 10:52 AM
Status: "delete" (set 28 days ago)
 
3,189 posts, read 1,280,483 times
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Originally Posted by Hoonose View Post
I think I said that. The locally affected economies, but not necessarily the broader economy.
An oil shock will affect the broader economy. Idiot speculators are going to cause it to be much worse than it would be if they weren't taking advantage of these low interest rates, driving the prices up for almost every asset class, including real estate and equities.

Wages are stagnant and commercial real estate is under intense pressure. When oil goes above $100/bbl or likely even higher, it will come with severe consequences, resulting in what will likely amount to be a global financial meltdown.

Worse, it's bad for our national defense policy as we are draining our resources at an economic loss. This is the beginning of the end of US sovereignty. This is what happens when people are complacent and only chase dollars.
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Old 06-30-2017, 12:21 PM
 
2,254 posts, read 1,398,389 times
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Originally Posted by Jobster View Post
An oil shock will affect the broader economy. Idiot speculators are going to cause it to be much worse than it would be if they weren't taking advantage of these low interest rates, driving the prices up for almost every asset class, including real estate and equities.

Wages are stagnant and commercial real estate is under intense pressure. When oil goes above $100/bbl or likely even higher, it will come with severe consequences, resulting in what will likely amount to be a global financial meltdown.

Worse, it's bad for our national defense policy as we are draining our resources at an economic loss. This is the beginning of the end of US sovereignty. This is what happens when people are complacent and only chase dollars.
The u.s is going to lose its sovereignty? To WHO exactly? If this so called oil shock happens, i would place my bets on the u.s navy controlling the sea lanes and the remaining oil supply.

Either way, When oil becomes more expensive, it drives up the profitability and viability of alternative methods. They will become attractive and at some point a no brained if the fossil fuels ever get as low in supply as you think they will go.
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Old 06-30-2017, 12:38 PM
Status: "delete" (set 28 days ago)
 
3,189 posts, read 1,280,483 times
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Originally Posted by Thatsright19 View Post
The u.s is going to lose its sovereignty? To WHO exactly? If this so called oil shock happens, i would place my bets on the u.s navy controlling the sea lanes and the remaining oil supply.

Either way, When oil becomes more expensive, it drives up the profitability and viability of alternative methods. They will become attractive and at some point a no brained if the fossil fuels ever get as low in supply as you think they will go.
Well, I believe there will be consolidation of formerly sovereign banking functions into one global entity, so the US will ultimately not have control over its finances. They will blame Trump and populism. The writing is on the wall.
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Old 06-30-2017, 01:40 PM
 
8,301 posts, read 3,466,952 times
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Originally Posted by Jobster View Post
Well, I believe there will be consolidation of formerly sovereign banking functions into one global entity, so the US will ultimately not have control over its finances. They will blame Trump and populism. The writing is on the wall.
If the Planet Earth experiences an alien invasion, then all bets are off. That's one thing we couldn't blame on Trump.

lol
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Old 07-01-2017, 11:07 PM
 
24,760 posts, read 26,848,973 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AJT123 View Post
I would imagine fuel will stay cheap like this for at least 3-5 years due to general trends, supply and demand, etc. Maybe even a decade.

But wondering what others think, or if any professionals in the industry can chime in.

It's funny. The gas guzzler, body-on-frame SUVs (Tahoe, Expedition, Yukon, etc.) are everywhere again. I remember how back when gas was $4 they were piled up on dealer lots.

When I started driving (1998) gas was .89, .99., and .$1.09 for premium. Then it crept up at the turn of the century, became ridiculous another 7 or so years later, then leveled back down a bit but in general stayed high. Now, in 2017, it's downright cheap.

Hoping gas will remain cheap for the next decade or longer.
Who knows?

You won't care as much if you set up your life so that you don't have a long commute in a gas guzzling vehicle. Those are smart things to do regardless of the price of gas.

Unfortunately, when the price of gas drops, people do the exact opposite of what they should do. Instead of keeping their consumption the same or reducing it and saving the difference, many increase their consumption, acting as though low prices will stay forever. Then they act shocked when prices go back up again. I have seen this happen over and over and over again. People never learn and it's a frustrating thing to witness.
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Old 07-02-2017, 08:11 AM
Status: "delete" (set 28 days ago)
 
3,189 posts, read 1,280,483 times
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Originally Posted by mysticaltyger View Post
Who knows?

You won't care as much if you set up your life so that you don't have a long commute in a gas guzzling vehicle. Those are smart things to do regardless of the price of gas.

Unfortunately, when the price of gas drops, people do the exact opposite of what they should do. Instead of keeping their consumption the same or reducing it and saving the difference, many increase their consumption, acting as though low prices will stay forever. Then they act shocked when prices go back up again. I have seen this happen over and over and over again. People never learn and it's a frustrating thing to witness.


People are not that smart. Society is doomed.
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Old 07-02-2017, 02:18 PM
 
3,612 posts, read 2,032,943 times
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It's funny/sad that people and the US as a country "prep" for anything of the invasion type, but not for anything else.
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