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Old 09-22-2019, 09:32 AM
 
1,422 posts, read 734,665 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldtrader View Post
In many instances the minimum wage acts, should be called job reduction act. The employers are preparing right now to weather higher wages, eliminating jobs with automation. ...
Oldtrader, automation reduces per unit costs and/or improves quality and/or consistency of those products’ quality. It has not and will not be to USA’s net economic detriment.

Automation tools, assembly lines, and methods require labor to design, create, maintain, and repair them even if they may not require many people to operate them.
Automated production, no less than the production of any other services or goods products, requires production supporting labor and enterprises.

Automation has always been, and I expect it will continue to be to our nation's best interest. To the extent that labor's costs are less, introduction of automation is delayed. This is typical of our world's poorest economies.
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Old 09-22-2019, 12:31 PM
 
Location: Ohio
20,431 posts, read 14,517,323 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Supposn View Post
Oldtrader, automation reduces per unit costs and/or improves quality and/or consistency of those products’ quality. It has not and will not be to USA’s net economic detriment.
Wow, you finally made a truthful accurate statement.

Which website did you steal that from?
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Old 09-22-2019, 05:10 PM
 
11,224 posts, read 9,591,798 times
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It creates winners and losers. The winners are the high skill workers who can design, build, program, and maintain the automated systems. It also, of course, includes those who benefit from the higher level of production at lower cost (the owners.) The losers are the workers who's jobs get automated out of existence. Moving workers from one camp to another is not easy, simple, or cheap (low wage workers tend to be low wage workers for a reason.) And the numbers are nowhere near even. There would likely be a much lower number of jobs created to implement/support the automation than exist in the non-automated environment.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Supposn View Post
Oldtrader, automation reduces per unit costs and/or improves quality and/or consistency of those products’ quality. It has not and will not be to USA’s net economic detriment.

Automation tools, assembly lines, and methods require labor to design, create, maintain, and repair them even if they may not require many people to operate them.
Automated production, no less than the production of any other services or goods products, requires production supporting labor and enterprises.

Automation has always been, and I expect it will continue to be to our nation's best interest. To the extent that labor's costs are less, introduction of automation is delayed. This is typical of our world's poorest economies.
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Old Today, 12:16 PM
 
1,422 posts, read 734,665 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BBMW View Post
It creates winners and losers. The winners are the high skill workers ... The losers are the workers who's jobs get automated out of existence. ... There would likely be a much lower number of jobs created to implement/support the automation than exist in the non-automated environment.
BBMW, automation has always been to our nation's best interest. To the extents of labor costs being less, introduction of automation is delayed. This is typical of our world's poorest economies. Automation can only be delayed, it cannot be halted.

Interestingly, because poorer nations' technological advancements were slower and they lacked extensive land line communications in place, they skipped over an intermediate step of development. They advanced in great leaps when adopting wireless computers and cell phones. I would hope that cities more recently adopting subways for mass transportation benefited from lessons derived from New York City's filthy rat and roach infested systems.

The actual consequences of our adopting computer technology was contrary to what you describe. Ability to process more data more quickly induced more jobs and greater payrolls for all wage brackets. Of course, greater abilities are always advantageous.
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Old Today, 03:47 PM
 
Location: Oregon, formerly Texas
5,534 posts, read 3,872,368 times
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Automation has been a goal of businesses since the industrial revolution was an itty-bitty baby. Humans are expensive. They get sick, they complain, they have bad days. A machine works until it doesn't, and then it can be fixed.

This was the case long before the concept of minimum wage was invented.
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