U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: What states are "Southern".
Alabama 8 17.78%
Georgia 3 6.67%
Florida 2 4.44%
Mississippi 7 15.56%
Tennessee 1 2.22%
Kentucky 2 4.44%
North Carolina 7 15.56%
South Carolina 1 2.22%
Virginia 2 4.44%
Louisiana 2 4.44%
Texas 5 11.11%
Oklahoma 1 2.22%
Missouri 0 0%
Maryland 4 8.89%
Delaware 0 0%
Voters: 45. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-06-2011, 11:20 PM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 30,698,355 times
Reputation: 7281

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobilee View Post
Perhaps a better test than Jim Crow would be if the state experienced the first phase of KKK activity, which started at the end of the war and lasted until the mid-1870's.
States with the most lynchings of blacks [1882 to 1968]:
1. Mississippi
2. Georgia
3. Texas
4. Louisiana
5. Alabama
6. Florida
7. Arkansas
8. Tennessee
9. South Carolina
10. Kentucky
Moderator cut: link removed, linking to competitor sites is not allowed

Hate groups in America:
http://www.splcenter.org/get-informed/hate-map

Last edited by Yac; 11-08-2011 at 07:03 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 11-06-2011, 11:21 PM
 
Location: Arkansas
374 posts, read 685,070 times
Reputation: 543
How in the hell do you put Deleware on that list and not Arkansas? Are people just not aware that this state exists or something?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-06-2011, 11:47 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia
1,321 posts, read 2,748,324 times
Reputation: 1464
The first phase of KKK activity went into Kentucky, West Virginia and Virginia, as stated by Nathan Bedford Forrest in a newspaper interview in 1868.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-06-2011, 11:57 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,782,157 times
Reputation: 8809
Quote:
Originally Posted by blkgiraffe View Post
States with the most lynchings of blacks [1882 to 1968]:
1. Mississippi
2. Georgia
3. Texas
4. Louisiana
5. Alabama
6. Florida
7. Arkansas
8. Tennessee
9. South Carolina
10. Kentucky
Moderator cut: link removed, linking to competitor sites is not allowed
Hate groups in America:
Hate Map | Southern Poverty Law Center
That list is absolutely worthless. I know you don't think they were all documented.

Last edited by Yac; 11-08-2011 at 07:03 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-07-2011, 12:04 AM
 
Location: Arkansas
374 posts, read 685,070 times
Reputation: 543
Is the official measurement of a state's "Southerness" the number of lynchings that took place within its borders? Is that something worth arguing about?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-07-2011, 01:47 AM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,232,269 times
Reputation: 998
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobilee View Post
The first phase of KKK activity went into Kentucky, West Virginia and Virginia, as stated by Nathan Bedford Forrest in a newspaper interview in 1868.
I guess you learn something new everyday. But there is certainly no question that the KKK activity was the most intense in the Deep and Mid-South. Also, as I'm sure you'd be amicable to this, I know somebody on here is going to use the two most recent additions to the SEC as a way of arguing the states those universities reside in belong in the south. First off, someone is going to have to explain how West Virginia culturally fits in with Iowa State or Kansas...as I'm sure you'd agree, they will have a tough time arguing. Second off, Mizzou only joined because of instability in the Big 12 and because the Big Ten, which we'd been trying to get into for years, and which is a better cultural fit, never returned our call and chose Nebraska over us. So the SEC was the next logical choice. ESPN even pokes fun at Mizzou as "the Midwestern executive trying to do business in the east." Regardless, I must confess I'm excited at the prospect of getting to play some of the best football teams this country has to offer.

Last edited by stlouisan; 11-07-2011 at 02:07 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-07-2011, 02:02 AM
 
Location: Underneath the Pecan Tree
15,989 posts, read 30,698,355 times
Reputation: 7281
Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
That list is absolutely worthless. I know you don't think they were all documented.
It wasn't really about showing proof of anything; however ,those numbers do account for the documented lynchings that occured in those states. I'm well aware those numbers aren't accurate; just like the census numbers.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ark90 View Post
Is the official measurement of a state's "Southerness" the number of lynchings that took place within its borders? Is that something worth arguing about?
My post was in response to those who were talking about hate groups and lynching. Not the OT.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-07-2011, 02:09 AM
 
Location: Jefferson City 4 days a week, St. Louis 3 days a week
2,709 posts, read 4,232,269 times
Reputation: 998
Quote:
Originally Posted by gwillyfromphilly View Post
I overlooked Missouri by mistake.
Okay (empties magazine clip)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-07-2011, 08:35 AM
 
Location: West Tennessee
2,082 posts, read 2,902,942 times
Reputation: 1337
If you want to talk about border states, lets not act like those states are the same statewide. For example:

Missouri isn't a southern state, it's midwestern overall. However, the bootheel is 100% part of the Mid-South.

Virgina is a southern state. However, Northern Virgina near D.C. is very aligned with the Mid-Atlantic.

If you feel like you can group border states completely into one category or another, good luck to you because you have an uphill argument to make. A general grouping is fine, just don't act like there aren't exceptions to the rule. I could make an argument for extreme southern Illinois as part of the south (and a damn good argument I might add). Does that make Illnois a southern state? Hell no it doesn't.

Last edited by GunnerTHB; 11-07-2011 at 08:49 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 11-07-2011, 09:40 AM
 
10,167 posts, read 17,125,548 times
Reputation: 5742
Quote:
Originally Posted by stlouisan View Post
The University of North Carolina's survey, likely done much more professionally than your's, will show you where the true south lies. Feel free to google it. It's also been mentioned in numerous discussions on here. Less than 25% of people from MD, DE, and MO identified as southern. By contrast, more than 70% of people from Kentucky and Oklahoma identified as southern. These were not small groups of people either...several hundred if I recall per state.
For those who have not seen it, here is the study again...as well as a "press release" giving a summation of it. This survey took place over a time-frame of 7 years, involving 14 individual ones (it was done bi-annually), and questioned some 17,000 respondents.

This is just my opinion, of course, but I honestly think this study, which defines "The South" by where a majority of residents consider themselves to live in the South and personally think of themselves as Southerners, is just about the best way to "define" its boundaries (if such a thing is possible at all).

*********************************************

WHERE IS THE SOUTH?

The South has been defined by a great many characteristics, but one of the most interesting definitions is where people believe that they are in the South. A related definition is where the residents consider themselves to be southerners, although this is obviously affected by the presence of non-southern migrants.

Until recently we did not have the data to answer the question of where either of those conditions is met. Since 1992, however, 14 twice-yearly Southern Focus Polls conducted by the Institute for Research in Social Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have asked respondents from the 11 former Confederate states, Kentucky, and Oklahoma "Just for the record, would you say that your community is in the South, or not?" Starting with the third of the series, the same question was asked of smaller samples of respondents from West Virginia, Maryland, Delaware, the District of Columbia, and Missouri (all except Missouri included in the Bureau of the Census's "South"). Respondents from the 13 southern states were also asked "Do you consider yourself a Southerner, or not?," while starting with the second survey those from other states were asked "Do you consider yourself or anyone in your family a Southerner?," and if so, whether they considered themselves to be Southerners.

It is clear from these data that if the point is to isolate southerners for study or to compare them to other Americans the definition of the South employed by the Southern Focus Poll (and, incidentally, by the Gallup Organization) makes sense, while the Bureau of the Census definiton does not. We already knew that, of course, but it's good to be able to document it.

--John Shelton Reed

**************

Percent who say their community is in the South (percentage base in parentheses)

Alabama 98 (717) South Carolina 98 (553) Louisiana 97 (606) Mississippi 97 (431) Georgia 97 (1017) Tennessee 97 (838) North Carolina 93 (1292) Arkansas 92 (400) Florida 90 (1792) Texas 84 (2050) Virginia 82 (1014) Kentucky 79 (582) Oklahoma 69 (411)

West Virginia 45 (82) Maryland 40 (173) Missouri 23 (177) Delaware 14 (21) D.C.
7 (15)

Percent who say they are Southerners (percentage base in parentheses)

Mississippi 90 (432) Louisiana 89 (606) Alabama 88 (716) Tennessee 84 (838)
South Carolina 82 (553) Arkansas 81 (399) Georgia 81 (1017) North Carolina 80 (1290) Texas 68 (2053) Kentucky 68 (584) Virginia 60 (1012) Oklahoma 53 (410) Florida 51 (1791)

West Virginia 25 (84) Maryland 19 (192) Missouri 15 (197) New Mexico 13 (68) Delaware 12 (25) D.C. 12 (16) Utah 11 (70) Indiana 10 (208) Illinois 9 (362) Ohio 8 (396) Arizona 7 (117) Michigan 6 (336)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top