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View Poll Results: Most like England?
Boston, MA 69 49.29%
Portland, ME 14 10.00%
Providence, RI 5 3.57%
New York City, NY 8 5.71%
Philadelphia, PA 24 17.14%
Washington, D.C. 4 2.86%
Pittsburgh, PA 3 2.14%
Other (please write) 13 9.29%
Voters: 140. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-24-2018, 04:52 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn the best borough in NYC!
1,991 posts, read 893,889 times
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Iíll give it to Boston just by the poor gridding system!
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Old 05-24-2018, 05:02 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
486 posts, read 216,978 times
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Boston is the closest thing we have to a European city, since it was not built with the grid pattern you see in other US cities.

The first US grid city was Philadelphia. Pretty groundbreaking to not have your streets wind together like a chaotic cat's cradle.

I'm hearing Philadelphia a lot, but I'm honestly not sure. Philadelphia did not have the vibes nor the senses London had. London was far cleaner. London definitely felt more touristy as well, which makes sense.
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Old 05-24-2018, 08:02 PM
 
Location: Montreal
736 posts, read 858,030 times
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Originally Posted by BrooklynJo View Post
I’ll give it to Boston just by the poor gridding system!
Pittsburgh also has a pretty poor gridding system, if only because it's an extremely hilly city.
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Old 05-24-2018, 10:46 PM
 
138 posts, read 122,066 times
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Chicago reminds me of London sometimes. Thereís obviously major differences, but having lived in London for years, Chicago takes me back every once in awhile. Lots of brick, lots of dampness, the neighborhoods set up. One of the reasons I like Chicago actually. Boston never struck me as British. Historic and colonial sure but clearly American.
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Old 05-25-2018, 12:19 PM
 
Location: Chibostoncaliseattle
2,112 posts, read 1,147,080 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
None. If I had to name a place that reminds me of London a tiny bit it might be Newburyport, MA or Portsmouth, NH. Actually, there are a few small cities in NH that have nice downtown areas and are neat and trim like London, with old brick buildings. Dover, NH might be another one.
Newburyport MA, Andover MA, Concord MA, Dover NH, Portsmouth NH.. Completely agree. I think Portland ME is more reminiscent of a British coastal town than Boston.

Boston is a bit more unique and pulls it's influence from a lot of areas in Ireland/Italy.
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Old 05-25-2018, 12:23 PM
 
Location: Chibostoncaliseattle
2,112 posts, read 1,147,080 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Whywontthisjustwork View Post
Chicago reminds me of London sometimes. Thereís obviously major differences, but having lived in London for years, Chicago takes me back every once in awhile. Lots of brick, lots of dampness, the neighborhoods set up. One of the reasons I like Chicago actually. Boston never struck me as British. Historic and colonial sure but clearly American.
I'm sure you draw the Chicago London parallels based on their core, which I totally understand. Very large urban areas with broad shoulders. Chicago even takes a stab at more gothic architecture than any other city in North America (outside of NYC).

As far as neighborhoods, I see more parallels in Greater Boston. The colors of South Boston, the brick in Harvard Square, etc. And as far as countryside, Concord MA is about as close as it gets to the fairyland countryside in the UK.
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Old 05-25-2018, 12:59 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
25,385 posts, read 24,293,814 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mwj119 View Post
Newburyport MA, Andover MA, Concord MA, Dover NH, Portsmouth NH.. Completely agree. I think Portland ME is more reminiscent of a British coastal town than Boston.

Boston is a bit more unique and pulls it's influence from a lot of areas in Ireland/Italy.
I think it's easier to see in small cities and towns. Years ago when I took my British born mother to Haddonfield, New Jersey, for the day, she said that it reminded her of Bromsgrove.
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Old 05-25-2018, 07:11 PM
 
138 posts, read 122,066 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mwj119 View Post
I'm sure you draw the Chicago London parallels based on their core, which I totally understand. Very large urban areas with broad shoulders. Chicago even takes a stab at more gothic architecture than any other city in North America (outside of NYC).

As far as neighborhoods, I see more parallels in Greater Boston. The colors of South Boston, the brick in Harvard Square, etc. And as far as countryside, Concord MA is about as close as it gets to the fairyland countryside in the UK.
The opposite actually. I used to stumble home from south London through the west end and just walk for miles. Been all over that city, know it like the back of my hand. Riding the el and seeing the old brick townhomes looks a lot like riding the tube above ground and seeing the same. The way the neighborhoods are set up are similar. Main drags surrounded by residential. Same building material. Similar color bricks. The similarities are definitely there if you know what to look for. Central London is nothing like the Loop or River North, etc. I love both though.
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Old 05-25-2018, 09:44 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,197 posts, read 9,999,586 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mwj119 View Post
I'm sure you draw the Chicago London parallels based on their core, which I totally understand. Very large urban areas with broad shoulders. Chicago even takes a stab at more gothic architecture than any other city in North America (outside of NYC).

As far as neighborhoods, I see more parallels in Greater Boston. The colors of South Boston, the brick in Harvard Square, etc. And as far as countryside, Concord MA is about as close as it gets to the fairyland countryside in the UK.

WHAT? Concord is as close as gets to the "fairyland" countryside of England? As close as it gets - No way!

Take a satellite look at Concord, its like living in a forest. Compare that to the mostly open and heavily farmed English countryside. Concord and much of heavily forested Massachusetts is almost the polar opposite of most of England.

If anything, the countryside of a state like Ohio looks more like England then does Massachusetts. Mostly farmland with patches of woodland here and there. The difference is that the farm fields in Ohio tend to be along straight lines while in England they are highly irregular.
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Old 05-28-2018, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Boston Metrowest (via the Philly area)
4,512 posts, read 7,590,140 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
If anything, the countryside of a state like Ohio looks more like England then does Massachusetts. Mostly farmland with patches of woodland here and there. The difference is that the farm fields in Ohio tend to be along straight lines while in England they are highly irregular.
Very true. In fact, relative to the English countryside, I think Pennsylvania or Virginia can make strong arguments for British comparisons.

The rolling, and much more pastoral (as opposed to being overwhelmingly wooded, like New England) landscapes, historic stone/brick structures (as opposed to clapboard/saltbox style, which is also very unique to New England), very windy country roads, and somewhat more moderate climate, all lend to more parallels "across the pond."
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