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Old 03-22-2018, 01:17 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 16 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,989 posts, read 102,554,590 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
She has a totally different accent than the Dominican guy. Presumably because she is a Mexican-American whose accent was influenced by her family and the M-A community in Corona.



Come down to New Mexico. There are at least three different New Mexican Spanish accents (spoken by people who have lived in situ for 4 centuries), not including the accents of Mexican nationals or other Spanish speaking populations. Hell, even a lot of white people from the Valley (middle Rio Grande) have the Valley accent.
I don't doubt it. I know some Anglos from New Mexico that have somewhat "interesting" accents as well, though I couldn't put my finger just on what. Kind of drawly.
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Old 03-22-2018, 01:20 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
She has a totally different accent than the Dominican guy. Presumably because she is a Mexican-American whose accent was influenced by her family and the M-A community in Corona.



Come down to New Mexico. There are at least three different New Mexican Spanish accents (spoken by people who have lived in situ for 4 centuries), not including the accents of Mexican nationals or other Spanish speaking populations. Hell, even a lot of white people from the Valley (middle Rio Grande) have the Valley accent.
Yeah, they do have different accents. And my point was that hou can be US born and assimilated, but it's normal to have an accent if you're speaking to your parents in a different language every day. And that ethnicity can influence your accent more than location.

I think there are 3 Dominican descended people in the video, all with different accents.

For some reason, New Yorkers are stereotypes as having mafioso accents, but as you can see that's pretty silly.
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Old 03-23-2018, 09:41 PM
 
3,500 posts, read 4,956,546 times
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NY City, Philadelphia and Baltimore each have different accents, despite being as close as they are. Sylvester Stallone in "Rocky" actually had a NY City, not a Philadelphia accent. John Travolta affected an exaggerated Baltimore accent in "Hairspray". And Wikipedia has articles on each one of these accents, explaining in great detail.
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Old 03-23-2018, 10:35 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,060 posts, read 3,381,283 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
That's not true, whites, blacks, and Latinos often speak differentlt



Pretty much lol


We say "cawfee" more so than "cwofee"



Well I bet the Hispanic people there sound a little different on average from the white people.
Why? I mean, ignoring the fact Hispanics can be white (I am, and sound just like any other "white" guy) people sound like the people they grow up around. Listen to Belita Moreno's natural speaking voice. It's a Texas accent. Maybe a Tex-Mex sound but otherwise she sounds just plain old Texan. No one is able to even guess I am Hispanic unless they tell me because I have no Hispanicness to my voice. I only speak Spanish with relatives that don't know English. Otherwise it's 100% English. I grew up in this country why would I sound any other way?
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Old 03-23-2018, 10:40 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Why? I mean, ignoring the fact Hispanics can be white (I am, and sound just like any other "white" guy) people sound like the people they grow up around.
Right, but there are accents that one could consider to be uniquely Hispanic-American. I'm pretty sure white Angelenos and Chicano Angelenos sound different on average for instance, but I could be wrong about that.

Some Hispanics sounds white, some sound black, some sound Hispanic, or any combination of the 3 lol.
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Old 03-23-2018, 10:44 PM
 
11,456 posts, read 6,575,220 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Why? I mean, ignoring the fact Hispanics can be white (I am, and sound just like any other "white" guy) people sound like the people they grow up around. Listen to Belita Moreno's natural speaking voice. It's a Texas accent. Maybe a Tex-Mex sound but otherwise she sounds just plain old Texan. No one is able to even guess I am Hispanic unless they tell me because I have no Hispanicness to my voice. I only speak Spanish with relatives that don't know English. Otherwise it's 100% English. I grew up in this country why would I sound any other way?
I know a lot of Hispanic people in New York who were born in the US and speak mostly English (the exception being their family members who weren't born in the US), but still have accents. I don't mean like a thick straight from Mexico accent, just a little bit of Latin twang in their accent.

It's not just Hispanics, I've noticed this with Asians too. I met a Bengali-American woman the other night and she had an accent even though she was born in the US.
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Old 03-23-2018, 10:52 PM
 
Location: Washington State
18,465 posts, read 9,561,235 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
What states have more than one regional accent?
Louisiana has:
1) Cajun accent
2) New Orleans accent
3) North Louisiana southern accent
4) Ebonic

These they have which are very distinctively different and then they have derivations between these accents.
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Old 03-24-2018, 01:11 AM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
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Louisiana has many accents. Cajun country and New Orleans have distinct accents, there's also the regular Southern accent and more and more these days the regular American accent. Various parts of the New Orleans area also have differing accents.
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Old 03-24-2018, 09:06 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,060 posts, read 3,381,283 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
I know a lot of Hispanic people in New York who were born in the US and speak mostly English (the exception being their family members who weren't born in the US), but still have accents. I don't mean like a thick straight from Mexico accent, just a little bit of Latin twang in their accent.

It's not just Hispanics, I've noticed this with Asians too. I met a Bengali-American woman the other night and she had an accent even though she was born in the US.
Look up Joey Diaz, hes from Jersey and sounds no different than any other "ethnic white" from Jersey. White Cuban guy. Cameron Diaz, also white Cuban, sounds like any white woman from California. Charlie Sheen, also Hispanic (directly from Spain on his dad's side) doesn't sound any different than a non-Hispanic white guy. You're thinking of Hispanic people who grow up in culturally segregated communities that also likely spoke lots of Spanish.

Hispanics, of any colour, who grow up in integrated diverse communities tend to sound more like their peers of various backgrounds than only sound like what their ethnic group stereotypically sounds like. New York does have it's Nuyorican accent but take a Puerto Rican person growing up in Minnesota, they're gonna sound Minnesotan as does a customer of mine who sounds just like a bunch of other 50 something year old Minnesotans, including the iconic Minnesota "O."

My ex's aunt is Mexican-american and she's got nothing more than a straight up country southern twang. His mother, his aunts sister, has a more Tex-Mex accent with a Latino sound mixed with a southern twang. Even two siblings can sound radically different. Also his aunts boyfriend (at least from a few years ago, Idk if they are still together) is a Mexican biker hippie dude who's got a southern Tex-Mex twang mixed with a laid back hippie sound LMAO don't underestimate the diversity of accents in the Hispanic community. We are just as American as y'all and we come from all races and ethnicities from straight up American Indian to blonde hair blue eyed Nordic types. Some sound like Speedy Gonzalez others sound like Rory Gilmore (Latina actress)
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Old 03-24-2018, 09:31 AM
 
11,456 posts, read 6,575,220 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Look up Joey Diaz, hes from Jersey and sounds no different than any other "ethnic white" from Jersey. White Cuban guy. Cameron Diaz, also white Cuban, sounds like any white woman from California. Charlie Sheen, also Hispanic (directly from Spain on his dad's side) doesn't sound any different than a non-Hispanic white guy. You're thinking of Hispanic people who grow up in culturally segregated communities that also likely spoke lots of Spanish.

Hispanics, of any colour, who grow up in integrated diverse communities tend to sound more like their peers of various backgrounds than only sound like what their ethnic group stereotypically sounds like. New York does have it's Nuyorican accent but take a Puerto Rican person growing up in Minnesota, they're gonna sound Minnesotan as does a customer of mine who sounds just like a bunch of other 50 something year old Minnesotans, including the iconic Minnesota "O."

My ex's aunt is Mexican-american and she's got nothing more than a straight up country southern twang. His mother, his aunts sister, has a more Tex-Mex accent with a Latino sound mixed with a southern twang. Even two siblings can sound radically different. Also his aunts boyfriend (at least from a few years ago, Idk if they are still together) is a Mexican biker hippie dude who's got a southern Tex-Mex twang mixed with a laid back hippie sound LMAO don't underestimate the diversity of accents in the Hispanic community. We are just as American as y'all and we come from all races and ethnicities from straight up American Indian to blonde hair blue eyed Nordic types. Some sound like Speedy Gonzalez others sound like Rory Gilmore (Latina actress)
I never said that all Hispanic-Americans have distinct accents, just that a lot of them do. I'm not sure why you keep bringing up white Latinos, they can have accents too (like Pitbull).

And I did not underestimate the diversity, I've posted before about how Hispanic-American accents vary a lot. Allie Brooke and Kap G are both Chicanos and sound completely different.
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