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Old 09-27-2008, 11:07 AM
 
3,283 posts, read 4,671,352 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
Introducing the GREEN* water bottle | DesMoinesRegister.com | The Des Moines Register (http://tinyurl.com/3mc7bz - broken link)

i don't consider this to be green. energy to grow, harvest, process, transport and store a container for a product which is freely available from your faucet?! not to mention extra farming land which must be appropriated. get a filter if you don't trust the water. just my humble opinion
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Old 09-27-2008, 01:59 PM
 
28,243 posts, read 39,914,600 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 58robbo View Post
i don't consider this to be green. energy to grow, harvest, process, transport and store a container for a product which is freely available from your faucet?! not to mention extra farming land which must be appropriated. get a filter if you don't trust the water. just my humble opinion
And you completely missed the point...
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Old 09-27-2008, 02:10 PM
 
3,283 posts, read 4,671,352 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
And you completely missed the point...

fair enough, help me to understand.
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Old 09-27-2008, 10:14 PM
 
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People are going to buy and toss plastic water bottles. Make them from petroleum or make them from biodegradable corn. Do you want the containers that people use sitting in a landfill forever or breaking down over time?

It up to you...
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Old 09-29-2008, 07:06 AM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
41,492 posts, read 51,399,522 times
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The important point is to force the entire beverage industry to internalize the real life cycle costs of their product. In Boston there is a return program and empty bottles do not remain on the street for long as there is an, unfortunately, army of the destitute that cruises the streets picking up the bottles for the deposit money. I think the fees should be raised to an inflation adjusted level.
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Old 09-29-2008, 01:20 PM
 
6,760 posts, read 10,434,520 times
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Yeah, the beverage industry would never do anything like, oh, say RAISE PRICES if extra costs were placed on their business. They would just gladly take the cut in profits.

Thats why we only pay $1.50 for a soda today that was 79 cents 10 years ago.
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Old 09-29-2008, 02:59 PM
 
28,243 posts, read 39,914,600 times
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And a nickel when I was a kid...
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Old 09-29-2008, 05:05 PM
 
809 posts, read 2,600,764 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nessatar View Post
That stuff still has be produced as well, which is a very intensive, water hogging, polluting process...

I prefer to reuse the glasses in my cupboard, or my Nalgene with my free tap water.

Although in the situation cited in the article, disposable things are going to be used no matter what, so it is good that they are composting the plates and bottles.

Be careful of those Nalgene bottles! I recently read an article in the Chicago Tribune about some sort of "poisonous" chemical in plastic bottles, cups, containers, etc. (And Nalgene ISN'T safe from this chemical!) the articles state Nalgene is in the PROCESS of removing the chemical, so obviously any bottles purchased BEFORE this time are guna have that chemical in it!

It's called BPA! (ie:bisphenol A) .... here's the links to the article (there's two seperate articles, read both!).......

BPA is almost impossible to avoid, but more companies are discontinuing use -- chicagotribune.com

Common chemical BPA under scrutiny as study links it to diabetes, cardiovascular disease -- chicagotribune.com (http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/lifestyle/health/chi-bpa-16sep17,0,5719184.story - broken link)
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Old 09-29-2008, 05:06 PM
 
809 posts, read 2,600,764 times
Reputation: 491
doesn't it stink.......

they encourage us to use REusable bottles (such as Nalgene) so that we don't add to the growingggggg number of disposable bottles....... but then you're guna have chemicals liek BPA in those reusable bottles!!!! It's like a total lose lose situation!
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