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Old 07-04-2019, 08:08 AM
 
39 posts, read 8,619 times
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Why do different kidney specialists tell me different things? I have high blood pressure since 12. Doctor said it's genetic. I got kidney disease at age 20. Now it's stage 3. It was stage 2 like 3 years ago when I was seeing a specialist. She told me not to run or jog because it will do more damage to my kidneys. I just went to another kidney specialist and he told me that's not true and I can run and jog and do other cardio exercises and that it's not a problem and won't do any damage to the kidneys. The first kidney specialist wanted my blood pressure to be 110/70 or 110/80 since she said it's for extra protection for the kidneys since stress from work and other things that causes blood pressure to increase can make kidneys worse. The new kidney specialist said he wants my blood pressure to be 130/70 or 130/80. The first kidney specialist wanted me to take lisinopril even though it increased my potassium. She said high potassium can damage the kidneys. My new kidney specialist said high potassium doesn't damage the kidneys but should be avoided because it can lead to a heart attack. He also added that if I take lisinopril that a potassium medication should be given along with it to decrease the potassium. For the new kidney specialist it says on the website that he specializes in high blood pressure medication. Does this mean all kidney specialist also specialist in high blood pressure medications?
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Old 07-04-2019, 03:09 PM
 
Location: on the wind
7,072 posts, read 2,899,892 times
Reputation: 23934
Have you asked your "new" specialist why there is such a difference between the old and new advice? The two specialists may simply take different approaches to the same problem. Maybe research has improved treatment, or maybe new understanding of the disease has revised the older recommendations. Maybe, because your situation has changed over time, what was indicated before isn't appropriate now.

These are very specific questions most likely no one here can comment on. If you don't like the new specialist, get another opinion. A third consultation may help settle some of the unknowns.
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Old 07-04-2019, 03:29 PM
 
Location: planet earth
4,805 posts, read 1,824,401 times
Reputation: 10660
Why don't you just ask the doctors or get another opinion?
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Old 07-04-2019, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Southern California
23,633 posts, read 8,219,173 times
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OP: Since you say you've had HBP since 12 does that mean you have been taking a med since then for it? Many come from genetics with HBP issues. I find different opinions from almost every doctor I've seen in my life. I don't know what I'd be doing if already dx'd with kidney disease. Ever think of a MD who thinks "out of the box" for our health issues. You must be pretty young, right?
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Old 07-04-2019, 04:21 PM
 
39 posts, read 8,619 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post
OP: Since you say you've had HBP since 12 does that mean you have been taking a med since then for it? Many come from genetics with HBP issues. I find different opinions from almost every doctor I've seen in my life. I don't know what I'd be doing if already dx'd with kidney disease. Ever think of a MD who thinks "out of the box" for our health issues. You must be pretty young, right?

No, my doctor told me I was too young to take medications even when I was 17. When I was older I saw another doctor since I was an adult. I am 35. I was 20 when I had kidney disease stage 1. I already asked the doctor about what the other doctor said and all he said was " that's not true. " I even audio recorded so I won't forget anything since I wrote down questions to ask. I like hearing the part where I ask him about running and doing other cardio. For years now the other kidney specialist put it in my head that I can't run or do anything cardio exercises because it will make my kidneys worse. Now that this doctor said I can do it then I will start tomorrow.
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Old 07-04-2019, 04:35 PM
 
3,958 posts, read 1,688,304 times
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Yes, cardiovascular problems and kidney disease tend to go together, so kidney specialists are trained in both. Cardiovascular training is pretty important if you have kidney disease. It might have been that when you started to see a kidney specialist at age 20, she wasn’t aware of how important it was. It might have also been that your blood pressure was not controlled and there were concerns about engaging in high-intensity exercise. No one is really going to be able to tell you why the recommendations have changed, but that isn’t to say that one or the other was wrong. Cardiovascular activity IS recommended for people with kidney disease.

https://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/stayfit - obviously the intensity level is going to depend on what your doctor tells you. I would say that if your doctor is saying it is okay for you to run, you should still work up to it and listen to your body just like anyone else would.
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Old 07-04-2019, 04:50 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
29,748 posts, read 54,373,866 times
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Just to give you another opinion, I also have kidney disease and high blood pressure. My doctor took me off Lisinopril, and substituted Amlodipine. I have no restrictions on activities, but then I’m not a person that likes any more than long walks and hikes.
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Old 07-04-2019, 05:01 PM
 
Location: Southern California
23,633 posts, read 8,219,173 times
Reputation: 15422
Long walks and hikes are best for everyone I believe. Running and really strenuous workouts are hard on anyone's body, my opinion. Gentle work is best.
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Old 07-04-2019, 05:19 PM
 
3,529 posts, read 1,344,614 times
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C-D doctors and specialists.
some will take ANY advice.
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Old 07-04-2019, 05:38 PM
 
Location: Southern California
23,633 posts, read 8,219,173 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turkeydance View Post
C-D doctors and specialists.
some will take ANY advice.
Who you talking to? Not me as I don't fit your words.
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