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Old 06-29-2008, 04:27 PM
 
Location: Louisville KY Metro area
4,824 posts, read 12,810,293 times
Reputation: 2116

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Quote:
Originally Posted by KYcoyote View Post
And with Louisville being logistics hub, UPS calls it the perfect national center for their operations, seems really weird L'ville doesnt even have an Amtrak station.
About 5 yrs ago, Amtrack did a typical bureaucratically stupid attempt to bring passenger rail back to Louisville. It was stupid because they 1/2 butted it by keeping the maximum speed between Indy and Louisville at 30 mph. The price to fly to Chicago in 1 hour was the same as an all night ride on the train.
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Old 06-29-2008, 05:31 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
4,678 posts, read 8,518,458 times
Reputation: 1960
Hardley no one rides the Nashville train...
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Old 07-03-2008, 02:15 PM
 
6,559 posts, read 13,765,501 times
Reputation: 3030
Quote:
Originally Posted by KYcoyote View Post
Steve, this is being done right now with UPS. They run 2nd shift shuttle service to/from Radcliff for package handlers and sorters.

Returning to the rail question, we've already got tracks in place running to West Point alongside Dixie Hwy and Peewee Valley on the East side. Strikes me it wouldnt cost much money to wake up existing train stations that been in place 100 yrs. Spur also runs to Bardstown.

I guess its a question of co-operation among neighboring counties, not bloody likely that Bullitt for example is eager to sign a deal with the city.
This is a VERY good point. People do not realize that Louisville, and most major cities, had an extensive interurban system. In FACT, Louisville's most desirable areas were historically interurban stops and streetcar suburbs. This includes Highlands, Crescent Hill, Glenview, La Grange, Anchorage, and Middletown. If you notice, on the tracks that cross over Baxter where it meets Lexington, there is the remants of an old Elevated train station. Louisville had some "L" train stops just like Chicago! Since coming here I have become fascinated with this city's history. It could have been one of the grandest cities in the south. Instead it is an alsoran (although underated) that is hardly known outside KY and IN.

One logical track would run up dixie to fort knox, along existing commercial tracks.

There is also another great commercial track that runs from Shepherdsville into Germantown, going past Ford, UPS, PJ Stadium and UL. In fact, the tracks run right THRU UofL's Student Center and it virtually looks like a train station is already there. When this line reaches Shelby Park, it turns before crossing over Baxter at the aformentioned Lexington intersection (and its decrepid old, graffiti covered station. From this, the line continues up Frankfort into the east end. The junction of this track at Lexington and Franfort could be extened with a nice elevated line up the much too wide, and largely deserted Jefferson street, which is seeing new life with high density developments like Liberty Green and the east market gallery district.

The final line could eventually be developed built from scratch up Bardstown Road to Mt Washington, but the conundrum would be where to lie tracks thru the Highlands.

All these lines could end in a loop downtown similar to Chicago's. Eventually it could be extended into sellerburg, IN via the railroad bridge around 16th street.

Here is a fascinating overview of Louisville's once extensive system. It shows you how far the city has fallen since her heyday as America's 12th largest city in the late nineteenth century:

The Urbanophile: Louisville's Elevated Electric Rail System (http://theurbanophile.blogspot.com/2008/06/louisvilles-elevated-electric-rail.html - broken link)


"In the early 1930's Louisville had electric commuter trains that ran at 70 mph on the Indianapolis run and were capable of nearly 100 mph. They were specifically designed and built with extensive use of aluminum and with special undercarriage trucks also designed for high speed. They were clones of the Ohio "Red Devils, but rebuilt on steroids"



There is a reason that modern "advances" and America's disposable culture disgust people like me. o $10.00 a gallon. It is in Europe. We sure have progressed haven't we? The push by realtors to move to the suburbs and the American love of highways and cars is absolutely despicable. It really makes me want to move to Europe.

Last edited by Peter1948; 07-03-2008 at 02:28 PM..
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Old 07-04-2008, 07:55 AM
 
Location: Kentucky
6,749 posts, read 19,958,696 times
Reputation: 2129
Quote:
Originally Posted by stx12499 View Post
This is a VERY good point. People do not realize that Louisville, and most major cities, had an extensive interurban system. In FACT, Louisville's most desirable areas were historically interurban stops and streetcar suburbs. This includes Highlands, Crescent Hill, Glenview, La Grange, Anchorage, and Middletown. If you notice, on the tracks that cross over Baxter where it meets Lexington, there is the remants of an old Elevated train station. Louisville had some "L" train stops just like Chicago! Since coming here I have become fascinated with this city's history. It could have been one of the grandest cities in the south. Instead it is an alsoran (although underated) that is hardly known outside KY and IN.

One logical track would run up dixie to fort knox, along existing commercial tracks.

There is also another great commercial track that runs from Shepherdsville into Germantown, going past Ford, UPS, PJ Stadium and UL. In fact, the tracks run right THRU UofL's Student Center and it virtually looks like a train station is already there. When this line reaches Shelby Park, it turns before crossing over Baxter at the aformentioned Lexington intersection (and its decrepid old, graffiti covered station. From this, the line continues up Frankfort into the east end. The junction of this track at Lexington and Franfort could be extened with a nice elevated line up the much too wide, and largely deserted Jefferson street, which is seeing new life with high density developments like Liberty Green and the east market gallery district.

The final line could eventually be developed built from scratch up Bardstown Road to Mt Washington, but the conundrum would be where to lie tracks thru the Highlands.

All these lines could end in a loop downtown similar to Chicago's. Eventually it could be extended into sellerburg, IN via the railroad bridge around 16th street.

Here is a fascinating overview of Louisville's once extensive system. It shows you how far the city has fallen since her heyday as America's 12th largest city in the late nineteenth century:

The Urbanophile: Louisville's Elevated Electric Rail System (http://theurbanophile.blogspot.com/2008/06/louisvilles-elevated-electric-rail.html - broken link)


"In the early 1930's Louisville had electric commuter trains that ran at 70 mph on the Indianapolis run and were capable of nearly 100 mph. They were specifically designed and built with extensive use of aluminum and with special undercarriage trucks also designed for high speed. They were clones of the Ohio "Red Devils, but rebuilt on steroids"



There is a reason that modern "advances" and America's disposable culture disgust people like me. o $10.00 a gallon. It is in Europe. We sure have progressed haven't we? The push by realtors to move to the suburbs and the American love of highways and cars is absolutely despicable. It really makes me want to move to Europe.
My husband's family is mostly all still in ireland and thei cost of living is sky-high nowdays even without as much driving as here. The housing costs are comparable to California.
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Old 07-04-2008, 10:28 PM
 
Location: San Diego, Ca
6 posts, read 16,762 times
Reputation: 13
I moved away from Louisville 1n 1997. For years before that there has been talk of a Light Rail system. As you can see, it's still being talked about.
We have one here in San Diego. It's really nice, but it is limited where it goes.
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Old 07-08-2008, 09:12 PM
 
6,559 posts, read 13,765,501 times
Reputation: 3030
did anyone else know about louisville's history of extensive elevated passenger trains?
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Old 07-08-2008, 09:18 PM
 
Location: Kentucky
6,749 posts, read 19,958,696 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stx12499 View Post
did anyone else know about louisville's history of extensive elevated passenger trains?
If they were the ones my Mother took from here to Florida when I was little then yes
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Old 07-10-2008, 04:20 AM
 
149 posts, read 702,917 times
Reputation: 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by stx12499 View Post
did anyone else know about louisville's history of extensive elevated passenger trains?
STX, my suspicion is that lobby's being formed to bring em back even as we spaek. Aint the smartest guy in the world, but reconnoitre the city deserves media blitz on this topic regarding revival of abandoned rail stations already in place at key locations as you've described. Now with lotsa important people here at the Kentucky forums group showing up and speaking their mind it's likely to occur.

Missy, could that Florida train have been the Orange Blossom Special?? Immortalized in music being the best song any fiddler wants to play.
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Old 07-11-2008, 05:03 AM
 
Location: Kentucky
6,749 posts, read 19,958,696 times
Reputation: 2129
Quote:
Originally Posted by KYcoyote View Post
Missy, could that Florida train have been the Orange Blossom Special?? Immortalized in music being the best song any fiddler wants to play.
Honey I have no idea. I do believe though that it came and went from an old L&N yard.
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Old 05-12-2014, 06:41 PM
 
2 posts, read 1,622 times
Reputation: 10
I do think that Louisville could support a type of Rail Transit, which is why I made a website. The link is here: Light Rail and Streetcar Transit in Louisville, Ky
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