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Old 10-27-2010, 02:37 PM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
15,400 posts, read 25,774,950 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by South Jersey Styx View Post

There are subdivisions and developments and strip malls outside of town but I am not sure if all that is "more" compared to the historic part of the city added with the rural/farmland parts.
Fair enough. You know your town much better than I do, so I withdraw that comment. It was just an observation from a few visits, and observations can be wrong. You, OTOH, live there and would know.

ps, I get your point, but you do know at least a few people who genuinely love Nova. For example, you know me.
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Old 10-27-2010, 02:41 PM
 
Location: In the woods
3,315 posts, read 8,772,060 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by normie View Post
. . . ps, I get your point, but you do know at least a few people who genuinely love Nova. For example, you know me.
Oops you're right! Thanks for reminding me Normie!
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Old 10-27-2010, 02:59 PM
 
Location: Home is where the heart is
15,400 posts, read 25,774,950 times
Reputation: 18989
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaliTerp07 View Post
I agree that you should research the place ahead of time and come into it eyes open, but I don't think moving here means you have to embrace it and love it because you have employment here. Bloom where you're planted and make the best of it, yes--but mourning the lack of character or cuteness is okay, I think. Maybe one day developers or city officials will take note and adapt their plans.
I totally hear what you're saying, and I also acknowledge that I'm crankier than usual today so am probably over reacting. Still... just for the sake of food for thought, I have two thoughts to ponder. They may or may not be worth anything, but what the heck, here goes:

1. City officials can create things like pedestrian malls, but how can city officials take note and create more historic cities? If they aren't here, they aren't here. (Unless you want to do something crazy like dismantle the city of Boston and move it here brick by brick. Hmmmm, you know that might be an idea.... )

2. Mourning a perceived lack of character or cuteness is ok for a short time. Maybe. But to be honest I think it's a waste of time. It won't help you in any other situation in life, why would it help you live a happier life in your new town? Think about it for a second.

Let's say you need a date for the prom but the girls you want to be with all turned you down. Would you tell your date "Hey, I'm really bummed out because you're not cute and you don't have any character. But if I keep complaining about it, will you take note and change to please me?" I sure hope not, because that won't give you a nice evening. In fact the response you'll get won't be pretty. Instead, you find things you like about your date... and maybe as the evening progresses you'll even discover you liked her better than you first thought.

Another analogy: Let's say you didn't get your dream job. Do you tell your new boss "I'm really sad because this isn't the company I wanted to work for and I have to settle for a job with you losers." You might feel better saying something like that but you're not going to go far with that company.

It's just my crankiness talking, of course. I know you well enough to know you're a person who blooms where you're planted, and you don't waste time complaining--instead you bring up suggestions and ideas and intiate action. I just had this analogy in my head and thought I'd share it (If it sounds dopey tomorrow, and it might--well--my apologies. )

Quote:
Originally Posted by CaliTerp07 View Post
Name calling though, is never called for...I can agree with you there.
Thanks, it means a lot to me when people say things like this.

Meanwhile, getting back to the question of Nova's historic towns... you may not be able to really live in a historic city here, but you can get a flavor for it. Winchester, Waterford, Purcellville, etc. are all lovely places. I just don't want people from out of town to be misled. The historic areas here are relatively small--much smaller than in most other nearby states--and that's not something we can change. So don't come here expecting to find historic Philly or historic Boston or anything like that. All we have is little pockets. Most of Nova is new, and that's what we are.

As Popeye the Sailorman says "I yam what I yam and that's all that I yam!"

Last edited by normie; 10-27-2010 at 03:22 PM..
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Old 10-27-2010, 07:16 PM
 
Location: Macao
15,890 posts, read 36,018,879 times
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Actually, I'm not particularly interested in historic cities. I have been to Frederick and Hagerstown though, and liked their city setups.

I was researching Frederick and bumped up on the topic. I do think it is an interesting topic for the NOVA forum in general though - although, personally, outside of Frederick - and even then I am not sure, but I don't think I'd personally be interested in them.

I think the real issue with the DC area is the high cost of home ownership. Once a person is established in DC, you can take out the 3/4 of a million dollars (which I still think is crazy - but the wages people earn in DC seem to allow that).

But, the appeal of these outside cities, at least to me, and probably many others, is NOT because they want to live in a historic town. But, to me, and probably others, it is a FINANCIAL LEVERAGE issue. Although some make the argument it is for small town values (which is debateable if those values are superior or an illusion or whatsoever else).

Anyhow, why spend 3/4 of a million dollars for a home, when you can go outside the metro area and pay $150,000 for the same thing.

I think this is really what this all comes down to. Which is kind of why I started exploring Frederick, and bumped up this topic, which has quite a few NOVA experts. So, it just makes an interesting topic in general for the forum.

Personally, I really am attracted to DC and NOVA (inside the Beltway) - they ARE my personal #1 interested areas to live in, in the region. But we're not all millionaires or have attained high-paying 10-20 years with the same employer with ever increasing pay salaries yet. So, until then, you'll probably continue to have people interested in your metro area, and finding nice solutions/compromises for their start into your metro region. Especially those who aren't single adults, i.e. those working people with families to support.

Last edited by Tiger Beer; 10-27-2010 at 07:58 PM..
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Old 10-28-2010, 02:47 AM
 
53 posts, read 83,259 times
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My dislike for the newer developments in NoVA tends to be the intrusiveness of HOAs into people's lives... it takes away from the local government's role and is what keeps the newer homes with the same boring vinyl facade decade after decade, minimal creative outlets for use of outdoor space, etc. I wouldn't recommend the suburbs to artsy types for that reason alone.

My pet peeve about HOAs are the rules against clotheslines in the backyard. It doesn't get any more apple pie than that. Having some governing body able to dictate down to that level is downright unAmerican in my opinion. If most newer homes were built with inner courtyards like sometimes done in other parts of the country I think I could stomach it but I've yet to see a subdivision around here built with that themeing in mind.
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Old 10-28-2010, 06:35 AM
 
Location: Virginia
18,717 posts, read 26,826,108 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Anyhow, why spend 3/4 of a million dollars for a home, when you can go outside the metro area and pay $150,000 for the same thing.
You would have to go way, way WAAAAY outside the DC metro area to find a home for $150,000. Nova suburbs are often quite affluent. You can find townhomes for under $300,000 in some areas, but essentially the burbs are considered desirable and are pricier than you think. There's a reason Loudoun County is the wealthiest county in the country.

You used to live in NYC, right? Well, Loundoun would be the equivalent of Suffolk County or other Gold Coast areas on Long Island. Lots of trees, lots of kids, lots of suburbs, lots of money.
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Old 10-28-2010, 07:29 AM
 
Location: Macao
15,890 posts, read 36,018,879 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caladium View Post
You would have to go way, way WAAAAY outside the DC metro area to find a home for $150,000. Nova suburbs are often quite affluent. You can find townhomes for under $300,000 in some areas, but essentially the burbs are considered desirable and are pricier than you think. There's a reason Loudoun County is the wealthiest county in the country.

You used to live in NYC, right? Well, Loundoun would be the equivalent of Suffolk County or other Gold Coast areas on Long Island. Lots of trees, lots of kids, lots of suburbs, lots of money.
Didn't realize that about Loudoun County, although I have to admit I haven't researched out that way at all.

I have researched Frederick, Manassas, and Woodbridge/Dale City..and all fairly low-priced housing. But it does seem that your general suburbs in NOVA are very desireable and expensive. All of those three lie outlie the expensive bubbles - well, one of those three in MD.

Manassas is kind of a mystery though. Seems that prices are sky high all around it - Centreville, Chantilly, etc. Yet, Manassas seems to be the exception. Not sure why that is. (Maybe data is skewed as I believe I read that Manasses has had quite a few more foreclosures than other areas, for whatever reason). But, interesting that that again seems to be Manasses and not the other areas.
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