U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Virginia > Northern Virginia
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-22-2010, 03:11 PM
 
Location: Arlington, VA and Washington, DC
23,531 posts, read 33,237,890 times
Reputation: 32036

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by South Jersey Styx View Post
Agree with the previous three posts: Location does make a difference. Simple proof (currently) can be found over on the "General Moving Issues" Forum where there are lots of folks all over the country lamenting about where they currently live (whether it is urban, rural, suburb or whatever) and how much they feel out of whack and just want to leave. Many of them have similar feelings as RR; he isn't alone out there on this topic.

BTW, how's that saying go: "Home is Where You Hang Your Hat." Wherever that may be.
Yep, I've been noticeably more generous and less irritable since I've left NoVA. This while conducting a frustrating job search.

Like I've said; location isn't the whole cure but it can be a critical part.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-23-2010, 02:05 PM
 
Location: In the woods
3,315 posts, read 8,764,367 times
Reputation: 1510
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alanboy395 View Post
Yep, I've been noticeably more generous and less irritable since I've left NoVA. This while conducting a frustrating job search.
Good luck with your job search! I hope you find something soon.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-24-2010, 06:23 AM
 
Location: Ashburn, VA
577 posts, read 1,781,888 times
Reputation: 299
I would imagine that the further you get from the big cities the slower the pace and the more relaxing the lifestyle. I moved to NoVa from a small/medium sized college town in Texas and there is a difference in the pace of life here. So whether one goes to Winchester, Warrenton, Fredericksburg, or wherever, my guess is the atmosphere may be a little more relaxing there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2010, 03:59 AM
 
3 posts, read 6,026 times
Reputation: 18
As a college student who has lived in Winchester (Boyce) my entire life, I can tell you that it may not be all that you imagine it to be.

I now live in Burlington, Vermont, and my first visit back home in November was quite an eye opener. People tend to brag about a sort of "new liberalism" taking hold of Virginia, in Fairfax and Loudoun counties in particular. I can tell you that the physical barrier of the Blue Ridge between Loudoun and Clarke County serve as an imposing political barrier as well.

After a semester at UVM, Winchester seems to me to be a city in limbo. The growth in Winchester was mainly being filled by NoVA money - people like yourself who were looking for an exurb of DC, with a bit different pace of life. That lasted until the burst of the housing bubble. Now just take a drive on Senseny Road, between Jim Barnett Park and Opequon Creek, and you'll see just where the recession hit Winchester.

This seems to be the only growth direction in which Winchester is/was progressing. Some of the other newer neighborhoods lie along Merrimans Lane, off of Routes 7 and 50, and in Meadow Branch.

Things that I can remember not being in Winchester within my lifetime:
-Target
-Starbucks
-Home Depot
-A second Wal-Mart
-Best Buy
-Outback Steakhouse
-Any Indian or Thai food

On the other end of the spectrum, examine places like National Avenue. Lots of low-income homes, and these aren't the houses people are moving in to with great number. So what eventually happens is that the salt-and-Earth is eventually priced out of town. The incandescent light bulbs GE once made in this town are now obsolete, and the plant is shutting its doors.

in my opinion, Virginia is a rotting log of a state. This country grew out of it, but what was once there lost life back in the 1960s, where much of this state still stands politically. Nowadays, the only thing growing is the perpetual fungus of suburbia.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2010, 09:28 AM
 
Location: among the clustered spires
2,380 posts, read 3,856,070 times
Reputation: 869
itslowell: What would have happening instead of the growing of the "perpetual fungus of suburbia?"

I've lived in the urban village -- for my wife and me, it SUCKED. Drunken neighbors fighting, bumming/harassing us for money, [some people] hasssling us whenever we parked near their house ... heck, the drug dealer and the 20-to-a-house Hispanics at least left us alone. They were among our better neighbors.

I live in Vienna now. Is that a "fungus"?

How would you like things to be? Ageing factories making the same technology? Do you think we should outlaw CFL and LED bulbs so we can keep making incandescent light bulbs?

Last edited by bmwguydc; 12-09-2010 at 12:02 PM.. Reason: Language
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2010, 09:37 AM
 
5,070 posts, read 8,607,594 times
Reputation: 2722
It's not unusual for college students to believe that the scales have fallen away from their eyes for the first time when they go off to college - particularly if they attend school in an attractive, "progressive" town like Burlington. Hence the inspired "rotting log" and "perpetual fungus" rhetoric typical of a freshman essay.

Winchester may not be perfect, but it has its considerable charms. You may view it through a different prism in 5-10 years.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2010, 09:55 AM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
1,419 posts, read 3,008,948 times
Reputation: 434
Quote:
Originally Posted by JEB77 View Post
It's not unusual for college students to believe that the scales have fallen away from their eyes for the first time when they go off to college - particularly if they attend school in an attractive, "progressive" town like Burlington. Hence the inspired "rotting log" and "perpetual fungus" rhetoric typical of a freshman essay.

Winchester may not be perfect, but it has its considerable charms. You may view it through a different prism in 5-10 years.

THIS

Burlington is a GREAT city and UVM is a great and fun school...however if this poster goes anywhere else in Vermont, they will also see very clearly that Vermont is a dying state, much more so than VA. At least you can find jobs here in VA. Not so, up there.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2010, 10:41 AM
 
Location: Virginia
18,717 posts, read 26,804,480 times
Reputation: 42860
Quote:
Originally Posted by JEB77 View Post
It's not unusual for college students to believe that the scales have fallen away from their eyes for the first time when they go off to college - particularly if they attend school in an attractive, "progressive" town like Burlington. Hence the inspired "rotting log" and "perpetual fungus" rhetoric typical of a freshman essay.

Winchester may not be perfect, but it has its considerable charms. You may view it through a different prism in 5-10 years.
Beautifully said, and so true.

Suburbia and small towns appeal more to people as they get older. There are lots of exceptions, of course, but in general I recommend that anyone under the age of 25 live only in cities or artsy, hip towns. Soon enough urban streets and artsy towns will lose a lot of their appeal, and suburbs will seem more attractive. But that doesn't seem to happen until your late 20s or even into your 30s.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2010, 11:53 AM
 
5,328 posts, read 6,113,652 times
Reputation: 2619
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caladium View Post
Beautifully said, and so true.

Suburbia and small towns appeal more to people as they get older. There are lots of exceptions, of course, but in general I recommend that anyone under the age of 25 live only in cities or artsy, hip towns. Soon enough urban streets and artsy towns will lose a lot of their appeal, and suburbs will seem more attractive. But that doesn't seem to happen until your late 20s or even into your 30s.
48 here, still waiting for that to happen!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2010, 12:28 PM
 
5,070 posts, read 8,607,594 times
Reputation: 2722
Quote:
Originally Posted by robbobobbo View Post
48 here, still waiting for that to happen!
Got it. Sometimes, there can be a tendency for we suburbanites to speak of urban living in terms almost reminiscent of 1 Corinthians 13:11 ("yes, some day, you will put away your childish [urban] things and learn to dwell among the adult pod people of the Beltway").

Some of us like the suburbs, some of us like the cities, and some of us like both. It's still a time-honored rite of passage for many young folks to reject - for at least some period of time - the environment where they grew up. It could just as easily be someone who grew up in New York City rejecting the Upper East Side for a commune in Vermont or a kibbutz in Israel as someone who grew up in Winchester turning his or her back on that town once they've lived in Burlington.

Last edited by JD984; 12-09-2010 at 12:41 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Virginia > Northern Virginia
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. | Please obey Forum Rules | Terms of Use and Privacy Policy

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top