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Old 12-04-2016, 03:13 PM
 
Location: Brackenwood
3,245 posts, read 1,291,899 times
Reputation: 6554

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweet Like Sugar View Post
Being sick of work doesn't count as sickness?
It better if employers expect their workforce to remain engaged and productive.
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Old 12-04-2016, 05:25 PM
 
Location: Middle of the Pacific Ocean
11,400 posts, read 6,169,289 times
Reputation: 11237
I don't think they are the same. As many have stated, being "sick" doesn't have to mean physically sick, but can simply mean that you need a mental break from work. At the end of the day, you are taking advantage of something that is owed/promised to you, which is definitely not the case with shoplifting.
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Old 12-04-2016, 06:05 PM
 
3,644 posts, read 1,836,228 times
Reputation: 11170
Smokers in my office take 15 minute breaks every flippin hour - I don't see them putting in leave slips. That is stealing to me!
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Old 12-04-2016, 06:41 PM
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
10,367 posts, read 14,211,191 times
Reputation: 22812
Quote:
Originally Posted by SUPbud View Post
I feel this is truly some academic argument about a historical situation that no longer applies to Dec 2016. It's like talking about dialing characteristics of ROTARY PHONES from 1984.

Please, a show of hands - who's employer still uses "sick days" instead of "PTO"!
Tentatively raises hand, as our fortune 50 company has only recently gone to the use of PTO so it's still a new thing here
.
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Old 12-04-2016, 06:45 PM
 
Location: 60630
12,219 posts, read 17,913,819 times
Reputation: 11653
Quote:
Originally Posted by whocares811 View Post
FWIW --

That is why I think companies should stick to PTO,period. to use when and how one likes (and hopefully with pre-approval, if possible). No vacation days, no sick days. The only possible exception might be jury duty and MAYBE bereavement time for immediate family members (one's parents or children only, unless another relative actually shares the same home).
Jury duty is not a maybe. It's a federal law....or am I wrong?
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Old 12-04-2016, 08:59 PM
 
Location: Elysium
6,505 posts, read 3,586,733 times
Reputation: 4512
Quote:
Originally Posted by glass_of_merlot View Post
Jury duty is not a maybe. It's a federal law....or am I wrong?
You are wrong it is left to the states and in most cases your job is protected but not your current income. In other words you can be functionally unemployed for months but at least have a job to return to when the court releases you from servitude. It is normally government employees contracts which state that they will be paid which in turns translates that they are about the only class of people who don't try to avoid jury duty. Now those who depended upon overtime to make ends meet might be the only ones trying to get out of a vacation in the courthouse.
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Old 12-05-2016, 12:01 AM
 
Location: between Mars and Venus
1,526 posts, read 841,533 times
Reputation: 2027
That depends from which view point you stand, management or non management. However, employer sick leave is entitlement nevertheless, whether that or not getting paid is at their own discreet.
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Old 12-05-2016, 07:14 AM
 
12,151 posts, read 18,314,594 times
Reputation: 18862
Quote:
Originally Posted by ncole1 View Post
Can one argue that "stealing time" from an employer is morally acceptable while stealing goods is not?
For companies that have joined the 21st century, it's called PTO - personal time off. Use it for sick days or when healthy and need a day off just for the hell of it.
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Old 12-05-2016, 07:30 AM
 
Location: Elysium
6,505 posts, read 3,586,733 times
Reputation: 4512
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dd714 View Post
For companies that have joined the 21st century, it's called PTO - personal time off. Use it for sick days or when healthy and need a day off just for the hell of it.
And for companies that haven't and demand substantiation if you use sick time like an Army Sergeant would with a Private trying to get a Ferris Bueller day is taking a sick day "stealing" is the question? I believe in the Army and in those companies which don't allow for personal days it is
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Old 12-05-2016, 07:35 AM
 
3,644 posts, read 1,836,228 times
Reputation: 11170
Out of 18 people in my section, 5 called in sick today.
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