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Old 12-22-2010, 04:09 AM
 
Location: NJ
1,494 posts, read 3,033,604 times
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Default Is pittsburgh a very conservative area?

I'm wondering how it compares to NYC/ NJ. I know people think NYC is more open and liberal, but once you get to know the place its a very conservative place and so are the surrounding areas in NJ.
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Old 12-22-2010, 04:45 AM
 
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Conservative can mean a lot of different things. The area is somewhat more Democratic than Republican, but in a more old-school Democratic way. People here value traditions and heritages and most people are in no particular rush to change things. There is a live-and-let-live attitude that makes us de facto gay and immigrant friendly, in a non-activist sort of way. We're not particularly hostile to government, and expect it to do helpful things.

So in many ways we are what I would call small-c conservative. But we aren't Movement Conservative in the political/Republican sense.

Edit: Oh, and that does indeed make us much like a lot of NY and NJ.
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Old 12-22-2010, 06:48 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
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Definitely not a "tea bag" area. The word "conservative" has changed over the years. Some people would classify bush as a conservative. I certainly wouldn't. Conservatives in my day had fiscal responsibility. Hence the term "fiscal conservative". Tough question if you have trouble defining the term. Then there is the word "liberal". It has a very strange meaning these days. It has been fully taken over by an extreme media frenzy to push the word to an extreme. All out communism and dictation comes to mind. I can't use the word, because it is so extreme, I don't know anyone that I could call one. Pittsburgh votes Democrat mostly, but I think many prefer fiscal responsibility. Lessons were learned in the steel mill days that have people saving money in mattresses in this region. There were not tons of foreclosures in Pittsburgh.

There is a funny saying in Pennsylvania. Well, I find it funny. There is Pittsburgh on one side, Philadelphia on the other and Alabama in the middle. If you look at how PA votes, in that sense it is true.

Don't know if that answers your questions? Hard to define these words anymore. To me, they have lots their way. Even the word "moderate" would be hard to define anymore.
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Old 12-22-2010, 08:19 AM
 
457 posts, read 833,502 times
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1970s Democrat. They want the free ride but don't want to pay for it.
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Old 12-22-2010, 10:17 AM
 
Location: ɥbɹnqsʇʇıd
4,303 posts, read 2,861,560 times
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It's split up really. Here's what I've experienced:

- Hipster parts of town will have tons of people who lean to the left.
- Poor areas of the city have lots of people who lean to the left.
- Blue collar workers who have union ties still lean to the left.

On the opposite end:

- Blue collar workers who have no ties to unions are very right wing.
- Middle class/upper middle class whites are nearly always right wing.
- Many people have the "Pennsyltucky" mindset are scattered about.

Every office I've work in was at least 3/4 right wing (the Hannity, Rush, Beck type who memorized talking points from all shows). Also, every blue collar job I've worked out that wasn't unionized was either in the right wing or Pennsyltucky mindset.

So if you happen to be around older middle class white men they will most likely be right wing. It's very pronounced here if your don't live in hipster areas.
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Old 12-22-2010, 10:33 AM
 
293 posts, read 259,324 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Raven1976 View Post
I'm wondering how it compares to NYC/ NJ. I know people think NYC is more open and liberal, but once you get to know the place its a very conservative place and so are the surrounding areas in NJ.

How is NYC conservative exactly? I don't follow... what is "conservative" to you?
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Old 12-22-2010, 10:34 AM
 
Location: Portland, OR
4,262 posts, read 3,853,295 times
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Much of the city seems to be liberal. Once you head out of the city, it turns a bit more conservative.
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Old 12-22-2010, 11:03 AM
 
Location: Philly Metro
379 posts, read 18,661 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jrn14 View Post
How is NYC conservative exactly? I don't follow... what is "conservative" to you?
NYC and the surrounding areas are conservative, but it depends on how you break it down. The large minority population will always vote democrat, because democrats portray themselves (correctly or incorrectly) as being on the side of poor and working class people. Pro welfare, pro govt services, but also anti-gay and anti-White.

However, if you go to Bergen County, NJ, Fairfield County, CT, Essex County, Westchester, Suffolk, Monmouth, etc; you will find many suburban dwellers who already feel overtaxed, overburdened, with highest property taxes in the nation, toll roads, $10 bridges, $8 tunnels, high sales tax, high state income tax, etc. Yes, higher incomes relative to the rest of the country, but all of that money is taken away by taxes.

There are many wealthy people in these areas. Wealthy people like comfort. Comfort means security. Security means conservatism. Conservatism means that you are willing to give up some freedom to feel safe. 9/11 was in our backyard. I find many people in this area to be scared-sh*t puritan conservatives who prefer a Stepford perfect little suburban life.
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Old 12-22-2010, 11:21 AM
 
3,245 posts, read 2,897,413 times
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Quote:
Then there is the word "liberal". It has a very strange meaning these days. It has been fully taken over by an extreme media frenzy to push the word to an extreme. All out communism and dictation comes to mind. I can't use the word, because it is so extreme
No, it's meaning has not changed, only the corporate conservative media's definition of it.
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Old 12-22-2010, 12:01 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
10,988 posts, read 7,041,728 times
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Keep in mind the numbers are overwhelmingly Democrat most all the time. Same with Philly. The so-called conservatives are more verbose, so sometimes it may feel like there are more of them, but the numbers don't support that. If Palin runs, she will get almost no votes in this town.
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