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Old Yesterday, 11:37 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles
3,104 posts, read 1,692,967 times
Reputation: 3644

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Avondalist View Post
I take it given your memories of the late 80s that you are not a young person in CA. If you don't already own property there the reality is completely different now.
Housing markets across the country are at record highs and increasingly unaffordable.

The Wall Street Journal wrote about this:

"America is facing a new housing crisis. A decade after an epic construction binge, fewer homes are being built per household than at almost any time in U.S. history.

Home construction per household a decade after the bust remains near the lowest level in 60 years of record-keeping, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.

What makes the slump puzzling is that by most other measures, the American economy is booming. Jobs are plentiful, wages are on the rise and the stock market is near record highs. Millennials, the largest generation since the baby boomers, are aging into home ownership.

Bob Snowden, a home builder in the Grand Rapids, Mich., area thinks he understands what’s happening. He says he gets calls practically every day from families in the thriving western Michigan city asking him to build them a new home. He ends up turning most of them down.

Demand for housing is stronger than he has ever seen, he says, but land and construction costs have roughly doubled since the end of the last boom a decade ago.

A combination of tightened housing regulations, a lack of construction labor and a land shortage in highly prized areas is driving the crisis, according to industry experts."

https://www.wsj.com/articles/america...ers-1521395460

 
Old Yesterday, 11:42 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles
3,104 posts, read 1,692,967 times
Reputation: 3644
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chowhound View Post
Are you joking here.

The homeless camps all over the place. San Fran is so full of human **** and needles that a software app has been developed to try and help avoid all of it. The potholes in some areas are causing car damage. In downtown la the rats are causing damage to cars as been reported by more insurance claims for damage. You have to run a gauntlet of homeless people begging for money everywhere you go.

Some of the worst performing schools in the country.

I could go on and on.
Rats in downtown LA? LOL I lived in DTLA for years and still work there. Saw maybe 2 or 3 rats in ten years as a resident.

If you want to see rats try the east coast. Never seen as many rats in my life when I lived on the east coast (NYC/Wash, DC).

Not many by comparison in downtown LA.
 
Old Yesterday, 11:43 AM
 
1,828 posts, read 618,616 times
Reputation: 1397
Quote:
Originally Posted by Astral_Weeks View Post
Housing markets across the country are at record highs and increasingly unaffordable.

The Wall Street Journal wrote about this:

"America is facing a new housing crisis. A decade after an epic construction binge, fewer homes are being built per household than at almost any time in U.S. history.

Home construction per household a decade after the bust remains near the lowest level in 60 years of record-keeping, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.

What makes the slump puzzling is that by most other measures, the American economy is booming. Jobs are plentiful, wages are on the rise and the stock market is near record highs. Millennials, the largest generation since the baby boomers, are aging into home ownership.

Bob Snowden, a home builder in the Grand Rapids, Mich., area thinks he understands what’s happening. He says he gets calls practically every day from families in the thriving western Michigan city asking him to build them a new home. He ends up turning most of them down.

Demand for housing is stronger than he has ever seen, he says, but land and construction costs have roughly doubled since the end of the last boom a decade ago.

A combination of tightened housing regulations, a lack of construction labor and a land shortage in highly prized areas is driving the crisis, according to industry experts."

https://www.wsj.com/articles/america...ers-1521395460
I hope you aren't implying that housing market pressures elsewhere are the same as they are in California, because that's a ridiculous claim that is contradicted by data.

Housing has been out of reach in CA since like 2003. Even earlier in the Bay Area. $600k homes in Nashville is a recent thing, and there are still plenty of $250k homes there too. Not so in LA.
 
Old Yesterday, 11:46 AM
 
Location: 130 Miles E of Sacramento
5,526 posts, read 3,345,068 times
Reputation: 3692
Quote:
Originally Posted by Astral_Weeks View Post
What made California great was leaders like Pat Brown (Democratic Governor from 1959 to 1967). As governor, Brown embarked on building important infrastructure and redefining the state's higher education system including his seminal Master Plan for Higher Education.
Not just Pat Brown but all the governors that followed him when California was a red state up until the 90s
 
Old Yesterday, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles
3,104 posts, read 1,692,967 times
Reputation: 3644
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avondalist View Post
There are a lot of people who were forced to leave CA against their wishes because it became too expensive and unpleasant, between rising taxes, rising home prices, and creeping poverty. I imagine this is a sensitive topic for many ex-Californians and those current residents contemplating a departure.

It really boils down to falling short of potential that was briefly realized, a Paradise Lost.
Oh please...play us the world's biggest violin.

You don't get any guarantees in life....I thought the right liked capitalism.

I am a Calif native and old enough to remember the "good old days" when smog was 100 times worse and the homicide rate was through the roof. No thanks to your bogus Paradise Lost.
 
Old Yesterday, 12:06 PM
 
1,828 posts, read 618,616 times
Reputation: 1397
Quote:
Originally Posted by Astral_Weeks View Post
Oh please...play us the world's biggest violin.

You don't get any guarantees in life....I thought the right liked capitalism.

I am a Calif native and old enough to remember the "good old days" when smog was 100 times worse and the homicide rate was through the roof. No thanks to your bogus Paradise Lost.
You'd sing a different song if you had maxed out the salary in your line of work and realized that even then you will never be able to buy a house where you live, as many people find out now.

The slow disappearance of the middle class has been very acute in California. I don't think it's at all controversial to say life was better there in the 70s and 80s.
 
Old Yesterday, 12:08 PM
 
Location: So Cal
40,714 posts, read 40,282,555 times
Reputation: 42154
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avondalist View Post
You'd sing a different song if you had maxed out the salary in your line of work and realized that even then you will never be able to buy a house where you live, as many people find out now.

The slow disappearance of the middle class has been very acute in California. I don't think it's at all controversial to say life was better there in the 70s and 80s.
Damn straight it was.
 
Old Yesterday, 12:11 PM
 
Location: Seattle
1,181 posts, read 256,055 times
Reputation: 1253
California's Proposition 13 in 1978 might have something to do with the state's various economic issues... just saying. For example, prior to that proposition, California schools were rated some of the country's best; now, not so much.
 
Old Yesterday, 12:21 PM
 
Location: So Cal
40,714 posts, read 40,282,555 times
Reputation: 42154
Quote:
Originally Posted by rjshae View Post
California's Proposition 13 in 1978 might have something to do with the state's various economic issues... just saying. For example, prior to that proposition, California schools were rated some of the country's best; now, not so much.
California doesn't have a revenue problem, it's poorly managed wasteful spending problems at the core.

If 13 is repealed it would be a tremdous financial burden to the vast majority of homeowners.
 
Old Yesterday, 12:28 PM
 
Location: Middle of the ocean
32,212 posts, read 20,317,649 times
Reputation: 46508
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avondalist View Post
There are a lot of people who were forced to leave CA against their wishes because it became too expensive and unpleasant, between rising taxes, rising home prices, and creeping poverty. I imagine this is a sensitive topic for many ex-Californians and those current residents contemplating a departure.

It really boils down to falling short of potential that was briefly realized, a Paradise Lost.


I live in Hawaii. You think it's not the same? I can whip out 50 areas that have the same thing happening.
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